mental health – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 10:42:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png mental health – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 New rules to oust councilors after misconduct edge closer to approval https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/new-rules-to-oust-councilors-after-misconduct-edge-closer-to-approval/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/new-rules-to-oust-councilors-after-misconduct-edge-closer-to-approval/ The provincial government is about to change its laws so that a councilor who has behaved dishonorably can lose his seat. Orléans MP Stephen Blais’ private member’s bill passed second reading at Queen’s Park on Wednesday evening – an unusual occurrence for a non-government bill that seeks to change provincial law – and is now […]]]>

The provincial government is about to change its laws so that a councilor who has behaved dishonorably can lose his seat.

Orléans MP Stephen Blais’ private member’s bill passed second reading at Queen’s Park on Wednesday evening – an unusual occurrence for a non-government bill that seeks to change provincial law – and is now headed to the Standing Committee on Social Policy for further study and possible modifications.

“The harassment and abuse of women is a scourge,” Blais said in his opening statement to the Legislative Assembly. “And tragically, as we have witnessed over the past two years, the corridors of power in cities across this province are not immune to this scourge.”

Blais, who was an Ottawa city councilor before his election to provincial parliament in 2020, said he was motivated to bring his bill forward after the CBC and two damning reports from the Integrity Commissioner exposed the council. Rick Chiarelli harassed former staff members and job applicants for years, and abused his power.

MPP Stephen Blais, seen here in a photo from 2019, sat on the same city council as Rick Chiarelli. He said in the provincial law on Wednesday that he often wonders how he was unaware of his former colleague’s harassing behavior. (Jean Delisle/Radio-Canada)

There have been other stories of shocking misconduct by councilors in other Ontario cities, including Brampton, Barrie and Mississauga, Blais said.

The MPP for the East read aloud from letters written by three women who worked for Chiarelli who called for changes to the Ontario Municipal Act.

Stephanie Dobbs, one of the official plaintiffs against Chiarelli, wrote that the College Ward Councilor “used manipulative tactics to undermine my sense of identity and safety within the office, resulting in a deterioration of my mental health, physical illnesses and suicidal thoughts”.

Victoria Laaber wrote that coming to terms with the years she spent working for Chiarelli “came with a wave of shame – shame at realizing what was happening in the moment, shame at not being able to protect myself, shame at knowing that he continued his behavior long after I was gone, creating more victims afterwards.”

WATCH | ‘It’s infuriating’: Advisor to resume paycheck collection after harassment findings

‘It’s infuriating’: Advisor to resume paycheck collection after harassment findings

Former staffers Nancy O’Brien, Victoria Laaber and Stephanie Dobbs say it’s disappointing to see Coun. Rick Chiarelli is still in his seat despite two reports from the Integrity Commissioner which revealed he harassed several staff members and job applicants. 3:02

Half a dozen MPs spoke during the debate, all in favor of the bill.

NDP MP for Ottawa Center Joel Harden supported the bill, saying, “I can’t wait for this to become law. Several of his New Democrat colleagues also spoke in favor of the bill, as did the Ottawa-area Liberals.

Many, including Blais, have argued that ordinary Ontarians are likely to lose their jobs if they behave like certain councilors, but there’s no way to impeach an elected official who behaves the same or worse.

“Councillor Rick Chiarelli should have lost his job a long time ago,” said Ottawa-Vanier MPP Lucille Couillard. “This bill is badly needed common sense reform.”

Conservative government supports change

Councilors can lose their seat for violating election expenses rules and certain conflict of interest rules. But the most severe penalty for an adviser who behaves egregiously is a suspension of salary. Chiarelli lost his salary for about 15 months, but has been back on the City payroll since November.

Blais’ Bill 10, called the “Stop Harassment and Abuse by Local Leaders Act,” would allow a councilor who violated the code of conduct by not complying with policies on violence or harassment at work to be removed from office. The bill proposes that a final decision be made by a judge of the Superior Court.

The Progressive Conservative government has expressed support for changing the law. Last March, the government quietly announced that it would launch consultations “to strengthen the accountability of board members” — consultations that took place last summer.

In December, the government was due to table a bill to change the councilor conduct laws, but at the last minute the government changed its mind.

In Wednesday night’s debate, the Conservatives were represented by Stormont-Glengarry-South Dundas MLA Jim McDonell, who is the Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing.

He did not explicitly support Blais’ bill, but said his party supports change.

“I think stronger consequences should be put in place to deter misconduct and breaches of that trust,” McDonell said. “We have been clear, our government will not tolerate any harassment or discrimination in the workplace.”

There are only about eight weeks left before the dissolution of the Legislative Assembly for the provincial elections. It is unclear whether Blais’ bill can pass within that timeframe.

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Florida Senate passes controversial measure for LGBTQ schools https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/florida-senate-passes-controversial-measure-for-lgbtq-schools/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 17:10:37 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/florida-senate-passes-controversial-measure-for-lgbtq-schools/ The Florida Senate on Tuesday passed a bill banning “classroom discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity” in elementary schools across the state. The measure, dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” bill by its opponents, passed the State House last month and is now headed for Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, who has already voiced his support. […]]]>

The Florida Senate on Tuesday passed a bill banning “classroom discussion of sexual orientation or gender identity” in elementary schools across the state. The measure, dubbed the “Don’t Say Gay” bill by its opponents, passed the State House last month and is now headed for Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, who has already voiced his support.

“This is going to put the safety of our LGBTQ students and teens at risk,” Senator Annette Taddeo, a Democrat, said during Tuesday’s debate. “We won’t stop until this state moves forward and truly values ​​everyone, everyone, regardless of sexual orientation.”

The Parental Rights in Education Bill, which passed through both legislatures largely by party, has fueled America’s latest culture war, which has put students in the crosshairs with a combination of book bans, Pride flag removals and bills targeting LGBTQ. youth. The measure even caught the attention of international newspapers, Hollywood actors and the White House.

Supporters of the bill say it is about allowing parents to control their children’s education, while opponents say it unfairly targets the LGBTQ community.

“This bill tells parents that your right to raise your children does not end when they walk into a classroom. This bill recognizes that parents are not the enemy,” Republican Sen. Danny Burgess said ahead of Tuesday’s 22-17 vote. “The bill simply says there should be an age limit on certain discussions, it’s not a new, or radical concept.”

The measure prohibits “classroom teaching by school personnel or third parties about sexual orientation or gender identity” from kindergarten through third grade. It also prohibits such teaching “in a manner that is not age or developmentally appropriate”, which critics say could be interpreted as extending to all grade levels. Parents can sue school districts for alleged violations.

In a tearful speech to the Senate on Monday, Democrat Shevrin Jones, Florida’s first openly gay senator, urged colleagues to narrow the bill’s language to say the instruction should not be “intended to change a student’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

“I’m asking you to open your heart a little bit,” he said, noting the name-calling and avoidance he’d faced as a gay man. “Please do no harm.”

Jones’ proposed amendment failed.

Last week, students across Florida staged school walkouts to protest the bill, which they decried as the state’s latest move to limit LGBTQ student rights.

“The language and the supporters of the bill and the rhetoric around the bill really shows what this bill is all about, and it’s an attempt to hurt gay people like me,” said high school student Jack Petocz. . Petocz, who organized the statewide protests via social media, told NBC News he was suspended “indefinitely” for handing out 200 Pride flags for the rally after being told not to. do it by the principal.

The bill’s fate now rests with DeSantis, who signaled his support for the measure for at least the second time when questioned by a reporter on Monday.

“We’re going to make sure that parents can send their child to kindergarten without having some of these things injected into their curriculum,” he said.

Education Secretary Miguel Cardona condemned the bill in a statement Tuesday. He said parents are looking to national, state and district leaders to support students and help them recover from the pandemic by providing academic and mental health support.

“Instead, Florida leaders are prioritizing hate bills that hurt some of the most needy students,” Cardona said. “The Department of Education has made it clear that all schools receiving federal funding must abide by federal civil rights law, including Title IX protections against discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. We support our LGBTQ+ students in Florida and across the country, and urge Florida leaders to ensure that all of their students are protected and supported.”

If DeSantis signs the bill, it will go into effect July 1.

To follow NBC Release to Twitter, Facebook & instagram

Matt Lavietes contributed.

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Study shows link between child poverty and me https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/study-shows-link-between-child-poverty-and-me/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 02:02:26 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/study-shows-link-between-child-poverty-and-me/ A study reported in December in an article by European child and adolescent psychiatry shows an association between child poverty and an increased propensity to develop externalizing disorders in adolescence and early adulthood, particularly in girls. According to psychiatrists, externalizing disorders are characterized by poor impulse control, breaking rules, aggression, impulsiveness, attention deficit, and hyperactivity, […]]]>

A study reported in December in an article by European child and adolescent psychiatry shows an association between child poverty and an increased propensity to develop externalizing disorders in adolescence and early adulthood, particularly in girls. According to psychiatrists, externalizing disorders are characterized by poor impulse control, breaking rules, aggression, impulsiveness, attention deficit, and hyperactivity, among other forms of behavior.

The researchers who conducted the study concluded that multidimensional poverty and exposure to stressful life events, including frequent deaths and family conflict, were preventable risk factors that should be addressed in childhood. to reduce the impact of mental health problems in adulthood. The analysis took into account parental education, access to basic services, housing conditions and family infrastructure, among other variables.

For about seven years, 1,590 students enrolled in public schools in Porto Alegre and São Paulo (Brazil) were evaluated in three stages, the last in 2018-19. The students participate in the Brazilian High-Risk Childhood Psychiatric Disorders Cohort Study (BHRC), a large community-based survey involving 2,511 families with children aged 6 to 10 when it began in 2010.

Considered one of the most ambitious child mental health surveys ever conducted in Brazil, the BHRC, also known as the Project Connection – Minds of the Futureis run by the National Institute of Developmental Psychiatry (INPD), Which one is supported by FAPESP and the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq). Its principal investigator is Euripede Constantino Miguel Filho, professor in the Department of Psychiatry of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (FM-USP). More than 80 university professors and researchers affiliated with 22 institutions in Brazil and elsewhere participate in its activities.

“It seems logical to say that poverty is correlated with the future development of mental health problems, but this is the first survey ever conducted in Brazil to analyze the mental health of children and young adults based on psychiatric assessments done multiple times. . We designed our study so that we could collect data on mental health in adolescence and early adulthood,” said Caroline Ziebold, first author of the article. Ziebold is a researcher at the Department of Psychiatry of the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP).

Researchers used the Developmental Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA), a combination of interviews, questionnaires, and assessment techniques, to obtain psychiatric diagnoses in childhood (9-10), the adolescence (13-14) and early adulthood (18-19). They sought to detect internalizing disorders, such as depression and anxiety, as well as externalizing disorders, although the former did not account for a significant proportion of the overall results.

They used a specific questionnaire to assess the socio-economic status of families, concluding that 11.4% of the sample lived in conditions of poverty.

“The three-step psychiatric assessment produced consistent results by tracking changes over time. Children from poor families had lower levels of externalizing disorder than non-poor children at the first stage, but after a few years the curve reversed and the disorder steadily increased in poor children, with a likelihood of 63% develop disorders, while they decreased in poor children. the non-poor,” Ziebold said.

Gender inequality

The stratification by sex shows that child poverty has particularly harmful consequences for women. “This finding was particularly striking and can be considered one of the most significant,” Ziebold said. “Externalizing disorders are generally more common in men. Our hypothesis is that mental health problems are less likely to be diagnosed early in poor girls, whether in the family or at school. Also, they tend to take on more responsibility for household chores from an early age, such as caring for younger siblings and sick family members. This added burden exposes them to more stressful life events, increasing the likelihood that they will develop mental health disorders in adulthood.

Externalizing disorders were particularly detrimental to women in terms of impact on educational attainment, leading to repeaters, dropouts and age distortions, as shown in a study by the group recently published in the journal Epidemiology. and Psychiatric Sciences.

Also using data from the BHRC, the study concluded that at least ten out of 100 girls older than the appropriate age for their grade level could have accompanied their age group if mental health problems, particularly disorders externalization, had been prevented or treated. If repeated, 5 girls out of 100 would not have failed (More than: agencia.fapesp.br/37741).

“Children and young adults with externalizing disorders may be more likely to fall behind in learning, social development, and the labor market, which increases the likelihood of poverty later in adult life,” Ziebold said.

In Brazil, the likelihood of children replicating their parents’ low level of education is twice the likelihood in the United States, for example, and well above the average of the 38 countries of the Organization for Cooperation and Development Economics (OECD). Nearly six in ten Brazilians (58.3%) whose parents did not complete high school also dropped out of school. In the United States and the OECD, the proportion is 29.2% and 33.4% respectively, according to the analysis of intergenerational mobility by the Institute for Mobility and Social Development (IMDS).

In the labor market, the likelihood of children finding skilled, well-paid jobs increases with the level of education of their parents. In the case of parents with a university degree, their children are 3.3 times more likely than average to hold high-skilled jobs and almost 9 times more likely than children of parents with little education (more in Portuguese on: imdsbrasil.org/doc/Imds_Sinopse%20de%20Indicadores01_Ago2021.pdf).

Pandemic

Because of the long-term impact of externalizing disorders on health and social outcomes in adult life, the researchers’ findings reinforce the importance of anti-poverty interventions in early childhood, according to Ziebold.

“When we highlight the need to reduce poverty in order to reduce the prevalence of mental health disorders, we are thinking about the issue in a multidimensional way,” she said. “There are no quick fixes. Immediate actions, such as abolishing school fees and providing cash transfers and income support for poor families, are important, but there is also a need to think about broader measures involving the promotion of social skills. -emotional, stress reduction, access to education and access to mental health services.

The proportion of the population living in poverty has increased alarmingly during the COVID-19 pandemic, she added. According to a report published by UNICEF, an additional 100 million children have fallen into multidimensional poverty worldwide, an increase of 10% since 2019.

The report also states that as of October 2020, the pandemic had interrupted or interrupted essential mental health services in 93% of countries and that more than 13% of girls and boys aged 10-19 live with a diagnosed mental disorder. . Even in the best-case scenario, he adds, it will take seven to eight years to recover and return to pre-pandemic levels of child poverty (More than: www.unicef.org/media/112841/file/UNICEF%2075%20report.pdf).

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About the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)

The São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) is a public institution whose mission is to support scientific research in all areas of knowledge by granting scholarships, fellowships and grants to researchers linked to educational institutions University and Research from the State of São Paulo, Brazil. FAPESP is aware that the best research can only be done by working with the best researchers at the international level. Therefore, it has established partnerships with funding agencies, higher education institutions, private companies and research organizations in other countries known for the quality of their research and has encouraged scientists funded by its grants to further develop their international collaboration. You can find out more about FAPESP at www.fapesp.br/en and visit the FAPESP press agency at www.agencia.fapesp.br/en to keep abreast of the latest scientific advances that FAPESP helps to achieve through its many programs, prizes and research centers. You can also subscribe to the FAPESP press agency on http://agencia.fapesp.br/subscribe.


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Therapy, society and youth – The Courier https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/therapy-society-and-youth-the-courier/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 18:40:42 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/therapy-society-and-youth-the-courier/ The ancient Greeks believed that without a healthy mind you cannot have a healthy body. Living in the modern world where people have many responsibilities and tasks to perform in their daily lives has an impact on mental health. Healing people’s mental health issues and having a healthier life is what therapy and counseling sessions […]]]>

The ancient Greeks believed that without a healthy mind you cannot have a healthy body. Living in the modern world where people have many responsibilities and tasks to perform in their daily lives has an impact on mental health. Healing people’s mental health issues and having a healthier life is what therapy and counseling sessions are all about.

If we could go back in time, especially a few decades ago, we would see that society did not believe in mental health issues and did not treat them in the same way as they do today. In the early 2000s, people tended to believe that if a person sought a therapist, they were either crazy or had serious problems. Another feature of the past was that society did not accept therapy as an important aspect of people’s lives. People who needed treatment would not see a therapist or, if they did, they would not share it with their society.

According to “statista.com”, therapy looks different in modern society than in previous years. The number of adults who received mental health treatment or counseling from 2002 to 2020 has increased. In 2002, nearly 27.2 million American adults received mental health treatment compared to 2020, where 41.4 million of these people were treated with therapy or counseling.

According to COD Mental Health Advisor Dr. Dennis Emano, to understand the importance of therapy, we must first know what therapy is. A singular definition of therapy would be that therapy treats mental health issues and disorders without medication.

“There are many types of therapy. Each therapy covers the needs of each individual in different aspects. From an early age, people need to know and learn the concept of therapy and mental health. By meeting with a counselor or therapist, individuals can get on the right path to the type of therapy they might need,” Emano said.

Also, according to Dr. Emano, one characteristic that therapy and counseling have in common, perhaps the most important aspect, is that they both try to solve problems.

For example, counseling tends to focus on a specific issue for a specific time frame. However, therapy can be longer term and focus on the individual rather than the problem itself.

When it comes to youth, the future of this world, young adults need to be aware of therapy and its benefits. Young people need therapy or counseling more than ever; coping with stressors like homework and work. But how can young people know when to consult a therapist?

Social media and the stress it causes on the younger generation can be harmful not only for young people, but also for adults. Everyone, regardless of age, should simply ask themselves, “Am I happy? If the answer is “no” or if there is no answer at all, the person should not be afraid to ask for help. Even if the answer is ‘yes’, talking about experiences and why they feel happy can help individuals feel even better,” Emano said.

There is no doubt that mental health is as important as physical health. What society needs to understand is that it’s okay to feel different. It’s okay to ask for help, and it’s okay and normal to attend therapy or counseling sessions.

“The therapy isn’t just for people who have mental issues,” Emano said. “If you are human, you need therapy. Therapy not only helps people to solve their problems, but also helps them to understand themselves deeply and in a more thoughtful way.

Emano said accepting each other helps us accept each other. Therapy and counseling can only work if we as individuals allow therapy and counseling sessions into our lives.

Source: https://www.statista.com/statistics/794027/mental-health-treatment-counseling-past-year-us-adults/

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Student loan debt is hurting the mental health of most borrowers https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/student-loan-debt-is-hurting-the-mental-health-of-most-borrowers/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 13:00:01 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/student-loan-debt-is-hurting-the-mental-health-of-most-borrowers/ Kate Quick, 43, said her student loan debt was causing stress and anxiety for her and her family. Courtesy of Kate Quick When Kate Quick, 43, completed her MFA at the University of Alaska Fairbanks 22 years ago, she had taken out around $30,000 in loans. Now she owes nearly $48,000, even after years of […]]]>

Kate Quick, 43, said her student loan debt was causing stress and anxiety for her and her family.

Courtesy of Kate Quick

When Kate Quick, 43, completed her MFA at the University of Alaska Fairbanks 22 years ago, she had taken out around $30,000 in loans.

Now she owes nearly $48,000, even after years of payments.

“I just can’t think straight every time I have to deal with student loans,” said Quick, who now works for the University of Alaska faculty union.

She also barely missed an opportunity for relief. Quick previously worked as a university professor, so she investigated Public Service Loan Forgiveness, or PSLF, a program that would forgive her debt for working in education.

Learn more about Investing in You:
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The program requires 120 qualifying payments, which takes about 10 years. However, the rules governing the types of eligible payments are strict. Although Quick worked as an assistant and then as a tenure-track professor for 17 years, only the payments she made while employed full-time count toward the program.

She is missing the 120 payments she needs to qualify and she is no longer working for an eligible employer. Now she’s in a different career and sees few opportunities to return to teaching — she doesn’t want to go back to college, and she’s not certified to teach elementary, middle, or high school.

Additionally, Quick had to change its federal home education loans to direct loans when determining PSLF eligibility. This added $17,000 to his principal.

His monthly payments will also increase from $88 to $568 per month. If she follows the current payment plan set out by her service agent, she will end up paying around $170,000 to eliminate her debt. Her husband, a jewelry artist who went back to school to become a computer scientist, also has student loans and has a payment of over $500 a month.

“It freaks me out,” she said, adding that due to student loans, the family had put off buying a home and saving for college for their three teenage boys.

“It has created marital issues over the years because money is something people fight for in relationships,” she said. “And, especially when you don’t have many, that was us.”

A common problem

Quick is not alone. Over 60% of Borrowers Say Student Loan Debt Has Negatively Impacted Their Mental Health, CNBC + Acorns Invest In You Student Loan Survey Finds led by Momentive. The online survey was conducted Jan. 10-13 with a national sample of 5,162 adults.

“When people aren’t able to pay their bills or student loans as quickly as they should, there’s a level of shame and sometimes guilt,” said Aja Evans, a licensed mental health counselor who works with Laurel Road, a digital bank. Platform. “It can quickly turn into feeling bad about yourself and not feeling like you can present who you really are to others because you’re worried about the financial constraints in your life.”

The survey also found that the less a person earns, the more their mental health suffers when it comes to student debt. Less than half of those earning more than $100,000 a year said student debt had a negative impact on their mental health, compared to 59% of those earning between $50,000 and $99,000 and 70% of those earning less than $50,000 a year.

Women and young adults are more likely to report the negative mental health effects of student loan debt, the survey found. Still, more than half of baby boomers said their student debt had a negative impact on their mental state.

“People think student debt is a young people’s problem,” said Betsy Mayotte, president of The Institute of Student Loan Counselors, a non-profit organization that helps student borrowers with free counseling and dispute resolution. But that’s not true, she said, pointing to the millions of older borrowers who are struggling to pay down debt and save for retirement or who are retired and still repaying their loans. .

Why Student Loan Debt Harms Mental Health

There are many reasons why having student loan debt hurts the mental health of borrowers. Many Americans in debt end up postponing other financial milestones, such as having a baby, buying a house, getting married, saving for retirement, or even taking a vacation.

The system is also often difficult to navigate, and in addition to not understanding how their loans work, many borrowers struggle to understand their repayment and relief options.

This confusion can lead to higher balances or other costly errors.

“A lot of people follow income-based repayment plans that reduce what they have to pay each month,” said Bridget Haile, operations manager at Summer, which helps borrowers manage repayment. “The problem is that for many people, even if you make full payments on time every month for years, you’ll often see your loan balance go up rather than down.”

A growing balance, even when you’re making payments, is psychologically difficult to cope with, she said. Also, if someone has defaulted or been unable to make regular payments, it can hurt their credit rating.

And after

The moratorium on federal student loan interest and payments has helped millions of borrowers.

The Biden administration also relaxed PSLF rules, making it easier for some borrowers to obtain forgiveness, and wrote off all debt for some borrowers, such as those enjoyed by for-profit institutions.

Yet many borrowers don’t know how they will resume payments and find it difficult to navigate the systems that could bring them relief. Currently, payments and accrued interest are expected to start again in May.

Quick and her husband don’t know how they will make their monthly payments when they restart.

“We’re both tearing our hair out and wondering what to do because we can’t pay a student loan of $1,100 a month,” she said. “It just makes our heads spin.”

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City divided on what to do amid reports of gangs and drug dealing https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/city-divided-on-what-to-do-amid-reports-of-gangs-and-drug-dealing/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/city-divided-on-what-to-do-amid-reports-of-gangs-and-drug-dealing/ REPORTS of anti-social behavior and drug dealing in Moredon have led to complaints about similar issues in other parts of the borough. After Adver covered a public meeting that sought to find solutions to issues that have plagued worried neighbors for the past few weeks, our readers came up with their own ideas. Claire Barnes […]]]>

REPORTS of anti-social behavior and drug dealing in Moredon have led to complaints about similar issues in other parts of the borough.

After Adver covered a public meeting that sought to find solutions to issues that have plagued worried neighbors for the past few weeks, our readers came up with their own ideas.

Claire Barnes claimed that Blunsdon St Andrew faced the same bad behavior from young people, Caroline Cabrita highlighted the town center problems and Ruth Kiddle spoke about the problems in West Swindon.

She added: “The drug trade goes on everywhere. Knocking on doors and windows at 1am is also bad.”

Kay Gilbert said Eldene had seen several examples of anti-social behavior and suggested, “Bring back national service, it will separate the men from the boys.”

Martha Ellen said: “I think the question we should be asking is why do they turn to gangs, why do they turn to trafficking, why do they turn to violence?

“You can’t just treat the problem and hope it stops. You have to dig it up from the root cause.”

At the Moredon meeting, people discussed how to stop bored young people from resorting to these anti-social and illegal activities with suggestions such as youth clubs and activities.

Others have called for harsher sentences. James Higgins complained that “all they get is a slap on the wrist” and Darran Broderick expressed his views.

He said: “There needs to be a much tougher approach. If they live in a local authority home with their parents, cancel their tenancy if they can’t control the children. There’s no accountability.

“These teenagers would not go to youth clubs even if they still existed. There is no single answer to fix this problem, but if nothing is done soon, we will only see serious crime increase .”

Rob Mashford added: “I can’t go anywhere without the stink of cannabis. It’s not even hidden, they just know they won’t get caught or nothing will happen.”

Colin Seager asked, “What’s the point if they get caught, the lawyers will get them out pleading drug addiction or mental health issues or if they have family issues?”

Police have urged people to contact them on 101 or wiltshire.police.uk to report concerns which will help officers target offenders. On Thursday, PC Gibbs and PC Dyer went on patrol to West Swindon and Westlea to follow up on the tips.

A spokesperson said: “We targeted these areas due to reports of anti-social behavior and drug-related activity, spoke to several members of the public and reassured them.”

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Texas foster care reforms: U.S. District Judge hears report on state children without placements in decade-long legal fight https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/texas-foster-care-reforms-u-s-district-judge-hears-report-on-state-children-without-placements-in-decade-long-legal-fight/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 18:47:44 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/texas-foster-care-reforms-u-s-district-judge-hears-report-on-state-children-without-placements-in-decade-long-legal-fight/ HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) – More than a decade after the start of an ongoing lawsuit over the state’s troubled foster care system, U.S. District Judge Janis Jack was angry when she asked the state if it had a system to find out the whereabouts of foster children and the head of the agency said no. […]]]>
HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) – More than a decade after the start of an ongoing lawsuit over the state’s troubled foster care system, U.S. District Judge Janis Jack was angry when she asked the state if it had a system to find out the whereabouts of foster children and the head of the agency said no.

When Jack asked Department of Family and Protective Services commissioner Jamie Masters for an update on the system, Masters said IT was still working on it.

“Oh, for god’s sake. I just don’t understand this incompetence… You don’t know where the kids are,” Jack said. “Now we know today, 11 years after this trial, that no one knows where these children are placed. I’m just – I’m speechless. You are the parent. I don’t want to hear that the IT is still working. So.”

Minutes later, Masters received an update indicating that IT would go live with the system in July.

The video above is from a previous report.

Today’s hearing is part of a decade-long lawsuit that was filed in federal court in 2011. Over the years, the court has found that the state has failed to protect children by foster family against “unreasonable risk of harm” and called on court-appointed monitors to investigate areas for improvement and ensure standards are met.

Last year, 13 investigators reported that a teenager in CWOP, or “child without a placement,” snuck out of an unlicensed facility and was shot while allegedly attempting a hijacking. car.

RELATED: 13 Investigations: Teenager Shot After Sneaking, Another ‘Hangover Sleep’ Under CPS Care

Last year there were 165 children without a placement in January and it peaked at 416 children housed in offices and hotels in July, according to a report filed in federal court on Monday.

Judith Meltzer, president of the Center for the Study of Social Policy, helped write the report and said there are concerns about the number of children in Texas being placed in hotels or offices.

She said other states may have 10 foster children considered CWOP – far fewer than Texas.

“I know Texas is a great state, but the magnitude of the problem here has given us pause as the experts on the panel,” she said. “Institutionalize it as an approach to manage this program by setting up these unlicensed facilities across the state… we found that very unusual and very surprising.”

Meltzer worked within a panel of experts who interviewed 30 key stakeholders including the DFPS, state monitors, lawyers for both sides and other experts to prepare a report for the hearing. today.

“There are roots to this problem that go back many years and (they call for) significant reform,” Meltzer said.

She said the children in care “must be recognized as children” and not as CWOP children who have created problems so that the state can help “begin to heal the trauma these children have gone through.”

As she prepared for today’s hearing, Jack said she was once again heartbroken by the details of the children without an placement who end up sleeping in the offices or hotels of the Protective Services of childhood due to the lack of safe housing.

“I had to read it and take breaks because it broke my heart that Texas was treating these kids like that,” Jack said at the hearing.

A report filed in court on Monday details how a 15-year-old, whom CPS placed in a hotel due to the shortage, had sex with a hotel employee. Court documents say an investigation found the teenager feared this could happen to other foster children and authorities believe she may be a victim of trafficking.

In other cases, Jack has been disappointed to hear that some foster children are placed in 15 or more different places in a short period of time.

Jack said there were some bright spots in the report, but she is still discouraged.

“Looks like we’re going from bad to worse,” said Jack. “This unconstitutional and dangerous treatment of children continues to affect all those deeply involved in this matter.”

The panel offered several recommendations that the state said it would work to address, including discussing how they can extend mental health services to children in state care.

“With strong leadership, strategic coordination among all stakeholders, and targeted injection and coordination of resources, Texas can address the issue of children in unlicensed care without creating new restrictive GROs and can put measures in place. that benefit the long-term well-being of children. term, ”the report says.

RELATED: ‘I’m Letting These Kids Down,’ Says Head of State’s Foster Care System

Judge Jack and the state also opposed the low vaccination rate for foster children.

Jack said 75.3% of children in foster care are not vaccinated, far below the state’s vaccination rate for children 17 and under.

The state argued that some children refused the vaccine. Jack pushed back on the question of how this was possible since the state acts as the parent of children. The state said it could not force any of the children to get into a car and get vaccinated.

After going back and forth on the topic and continuing to disagree on why the vaccination rate of foster children is low, Jack finally asked the independent consultant if they had a problem. idea of ​​what she has had to deal with since the start of the trial.

“It’s not good,” Jack said. “My orders haven’t changed, the state of mind is there.”

The hearing is still ongoing and we will update this report throughout the day.

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Human star Kirti Kulhari says society’s idea that women are incomplete without shaadi bacche is sh ** https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/human-star-kirti-kulhari-says-societys-idea-that-women-are-incomplete-without-shaadi-bacche-is-sh/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 08:41:46 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/human-star-kirti-kulhari-says-societys-idea-that-women-are-incomplete-without-shaadi-bacche-is-sh/ [ad_1] Kirti Kulhari will soon be seen in the Disney + medical thriller Hotstar Human. The series explores the murky world of human medical trials. Kirti stars as Dr Shreya Sabharwal, who is one of the youngest cardiac surgeons in the country. In an exclusive conversation with IndiaToday.in, Kirti Kulhari spoke about her upcoming show, […]]]>


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Kirti Kulhari will soon be seen in the Disney + medical thriller Hotstar Human. The series explores the murky world of human medical trials. Kirti stars as Dr Shreya Sabharwal, who is one of the youngest cardiac surgeons in the country. In an exclusive conversation with IndiaToday.in, Kirti Kulhari spoke about her upcoming show, opened up about mental health issues and why she thinks marriage is overrated.

Excerpts from the conversation:

Tell us about your character Dr Shreya Sabharwal in Human?

Born and bought in Bhopal, Shreya comes from a lower middle class family. She was someone who decided very early on that she wanted to become a doctor because she was inspired by her father, who is a composer. He’s someone who is so sorted, at the top of their game professionally, but also someone who is not so sorted personally. She’s someone who has flaws, has her fears and insecurities, and she carries a lot of baggage. And that’s what makes her very unpredictable. She is very complex, complicated and very human. “

How much of a character is Shreya to you?

I identify with every character I play. It’s something that I learned because I don’t judge my characters and I don’t limit myself to the idea that yeh kitni meri jaise hai. What I’m trying to look for is the character in me, the traits. I will find Shreya within me and try to access that part of me that looks like or imitates Shreya or imitates the characters that I play on screen. This is my process.

How did it go with Shefali Shah?

She is a lovely actress and I was very happy to work alongside her and share the space with her. She is a complete actress, her homework is up to par, her acting is up to it. So it’s very easy to get along, it’s very easy to do your thing when the actors are doing their job, you’re just there to make the scene better. He’s someone I’ve always admired in my life.

Watch the Human Trailer Here:

From Shaitaan to Human, how was your acting career?

Of course, it took a long time. It doesn’t seem like long and it hasn’t been easy. I had to fight for myself and defend myself every moment, but I think there is nothing new about this. It has been an internal battle and an external battle – and all I can say is that I look at my life with a lot of gratitude, compassion and wisdom. It’s like you have to go through things to get to where you are today.

You mentioned gratitude, and that was also the idea behind your recent tattoo. Tell us about it

This is my 6th or 7th tattoo. It means gratitude for, of course, life in general and when I say life, life is made up of every day, every moment, every person you meet and all kinds of things you do. When I look back on life, there is only gratitude. So gratitude for everything that life has put me through – good, bad and ugly – for being here today. I really count my blessings.

You recently bought your first Royal Enfield. How did your date with the bike start?

I started riding very early in my life, like when I was 17, but I’ve always imagined bikes to be synonymous with boys. I am a great 4 wheeler. I have driven a scooter, but bikes are something I have never tried. And since last year, I had a very strong feeling that I wanted to take a cycling trip to Ladakh. I have been to Ladakh several times over the past three years and have motion sickness. I think that a bicycle is also a way of not feeling this motion sickness. I was like the main kisi ke pichhe kyun baithungi, why can’t I ride a bike? I think it all started from there. Here I am planning a cycling trip to Ladakh in June.

You also recently spoke about your mental health. Were you skeptical about this?

I do not think so. There are some things that I’m not comfortable talking about publicly, but this wasn’t one of them. I think it’s something I’m very comfortable with. Like, yeah, it happened to me. I have an idea of ​​what people with mental disorders go through. When you experience something on your own, your empathy and understanding of others who are going through it increases. I am very grateful even for this experience because this experience literally took me on a path of self-discovery, of self-healing. This is something to talk about for sure.

After your separation from your husband, you said that marriage is an overrated concept. Why do you feel this way?

Yes, I really believe it. If marriage works for you that’s fine, but if it doesn’t work for you or you don’t want it, I think life isn’t incomplete because you’re not married. I think that’s the strong conditioning that society has for girls, that’s the conditioning that I was talking about. After going through marriage, I realized that I didn’t have to spend my whole life behind the idea that marriage is the ultimate goal because it doesn’t. It’s good to be anything for as long as you want. And the same is having children too. When you are married, families put a lot of pressure. Again, this is their idea ki agar bacche nahi hai toh ek aurat complete nahi hui hai and all that sh ** if not aapki marzi hai aap shaadi karo, mat karo, separated ho jaao, divorce karo. I totally believe in individual choice and I believe YOU ARE COMPLETE with or without these ideas and conditionings attached to you.

Following Disney + Hotstar’s Human, Kirti Kulhari will be seen in 4 More Shots Please 3. The actress also has an interesting announcement in the works, which she is eagerly awaiting. The actress also has some feature films in her chat. It will surely be an exciting year for the actress.

READ ALSO | Human trailer out. Shefali Shah, Kirti’s medical drama to be released on Disney + Hotstar on January 14, 2022


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Children’s expressions show poor sleep: study https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/childrens-expressions-show-poor-sleep-study/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 03:35:56 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/childrens-expressions-show-poor-sleep-study/ [ad_1] Houston: The research has been published in the “Affective Science Journal”. “Sleep problems in children are consistently linked to lower social competence and more problems in peer relationships, but we really don’t understand what drives these associations,” Alfano said. Based on the results of some of his previous research, Alfano hypothesized that the answers […]]]>


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Houston:

The research has been published in the “Affective Science Journal”. “Sleep problems in children are consistently linked to lower social competence and more problems in peer relationships, but we really don’t understand what drives these associations,” Alfano said. Based on the results of some of his previous research, Alfano hypothesized that the answers may lie in part in the way children’s faces express their emotions when they are tired.

To test this theory, Alfano and his colleagues examined 37 children aged 7 to 11 in two emotional lab assessments; one when the children were well rested and another after two nights of partial sleep restriction. During these assessments, the children viewed positive (think kittens and ice cream) and negative (think getting shot and ferocious dogs) images on a computer screen while a high camera definition recorded their facial expressions. Parents of participants provided reports on their child’s social functioning at this time and approximately two years later.

“As we suspected, children who displayed less positive facial expressions in response to pleasurable images when sleep was restricted would have more social problems two years later, even controlling for previous social problems,” Alfano said. Although the competing relationships between changes in facial expressions and social problems related to sleep have not been found, Alfano has suggested that it may be due to developmental differences in social behavior and peer relationships.

“For young children, more explicit behaviors such as sharing and taking turns may be more important for friendships than subtle facial expressions. However, emotional expression becomes more important with age,” Alfano explained. . “Facial expressions not only allow others to understand how you are feeling, but they are known to have a contagious effect on how others feel,” she said.

The findings supported a growing body of research that pointed to poor sleep quality in childhood, predicted later socio-emotional issues, and also indicated the importance of studies exploring how sleep affects multiple facets of health. mental health and well-being of children. Facial expression, a central aspect of social communication, is one aspect of emotion where sleep loss has taken its toll.

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Diana Ayala on mental health policy, candidate for city council president, and more https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/diana-ayala-on-mental-health-policy-candidate-for-city-council-president-and-more/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 02:37:22 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/diana-ayala-on-mental-health-policy-candidate-for-city-council-president-and-more/ [ad_1] Board Member Diana Ayala (Photo: Jeff Reed / City Council) The president of the New York City Council should be someone who deeply understands the struggles of the people and who will focus on social services in a position of powerful leadership, argues City Council member Diana Ayala. During a recent appearance on the […]]]>


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Board Member Diana Ayala (Photo: Jeff Reed / City Council)


The president of the New York City Council should be someone who deeply understands the struggles of the people and who will focus on social services in a position of powerful leadership, argues City Council member Diana Ayala.

During a recent appearance on the Gotham Gazette’s Max Politics podcast, Ayala spoke about her experience as a representative of the council’s 8th district, which includes East Harlem and the South Bronx, the city’s approach to mental health care, the effort to shut down Rikers Island, his bid to become the next chairman of city council, and more.

“I have suffered from homelessness, food insecurity, I know what it is to be on the verge of eviction, I come with a different point of view, don’t I, on issues that matter most to my constituency, ”Ayala said. “This level of experience is important because people like me, I see myself as a very social service oriented member, understand the nuances of government because these are our lived experiences. We haven’t read it, we haven’t heard of it, we don’t just sympathize, we understand it very intimately because it has been our experiences.

After this year’s municipal elections, the race to become the next chairman of the city council is in full swing, with Ayala among seven candidates, all Democrats, vying to be nominated by their colleagues as legislative leader. The 51 council members, only a handful of whom are Republicans, will vote on the new president in January, but it’s likely someone will block the required 26 votes before the new year, as is tradition. Besides the Council members themselves, there are many other influential figures involved in the selection of the Council President, including unions, members of Congress, others elected like Mayor-elect Eric Adams, and more.

The chairman of the city council is essentially the second most powerful elected official in the city government, with considerable influence over the legislative agenda and timetable, important committee duties that impact both legislation and oversight , a major role in negotiating the city’s massive budget with the mayor, controlling some funding pots, the intimidating chair to impact public policy in multiple ways, and more.

“The fact that we don’t have Latin American representation in city-wide positions is important to me,” said Ayala, who was born in Puerto Rico and represents a district with large Latin communities. Americans, about what sets her apart as a candidate for city council president. “Second, there are no women in city-wide positions, that’s important to me. But most important is the fact that we lack leadership that is somehow aligned with the issues that impact communities of color like I am. “

[Listen: Max Politics Podcast: City Council Member Diana Ayala on Mental Health Oversight, Running for Speaker, and More]

In the podcast, hosted by Gotham Gazette editor-in-chief Ben Max, Ayala spoke about her experience as the former chair of the council’s committee on mental health, disabilities and addictions. Explaining that she has three close family members who suffer from bipolar disorder, including her brother who she says has been jailed multiple times, Ayala said she spoke out about the government’s “shortcomings” ‘he was trying to fight mental health.

Ayala said the Blasio administration’s Thrive NYC mental health program was struggling, but also didn’t necessarily get the credit it deserved amid a lot of criticism. “I really mean the First Lady deserves a lot more credit than she gets,” Ayala said of Chirlane McCray, the wife of the mayor who spearheaded the launch of Thrive NYC. “I think most people didn’t talk about mental health the same way we talked about mental health.”

While saying the program heralded a “much needed first step” in solving mental health issues, Ayala also acknowledged her flaws and said she wanted to see more resources available to New Yorkers with mental illnesses. serious, including those who are incarcerated or released. Better services can help prevent people with the most serious mental illnesses from being incarcerated, she said.

“We have to start building these relationships before the release, because a lot of times they don’t make it to these dates,” Ayala said, drawing on her brother’s experience. “They’re required and expected to fill out their own requests to make this appointment, to show up, and a lot of them, quite frankly, just don’t have the mental capacity to do that. For me, it’s the equivalent of asking a child to take the necessary steps to access care. I think unfortunately they need a bit more getting started and our system just isn’t really prepared to do that.

Ayala also spoke of her efforts to support the closure of the Rikers Island prison complex and the construction of four new prisons, including one in her district in the South Bronx. Since the plan was announced, with Ayala’s backing, there have been criticisms of the planned prison at Mott Haven. Ayala said that while she has not advocated for the new prison to be placed in her district per se, she supports her given the importance she places on the closure of Rikers Island, the use of a site owned by the city and the relative proximity to their loved ones and the courthouse for the Bronxites who are ultimately imprisoned there.

“I understand, it’s true, it’s a very difficult pill to swallow, but I think there’s a bigger picture here and I think it has the potential to do a lot of good in terms of reducing recidivating and keeping families connected and ensuring that people have equal access to health care, to mental health care, whatever you want, ”Ayala said. “I mean, there are so many benefits to that. So if they find a better location, I’m also in favor of that, but it has to go somewhere. Borough, which was approved by city council two years ago and is moving forward in the design and construction process, the Bronx site is unlikely to be changed.

Asked how East Harlem’s rezoning went, Ayala said she believed everything was going well so far, several years after it was adopted by her predecessor, then-board chair Melissa Mark-Viverito. , for whom Ayala had already held several positions. be elected to replace Mark-Viverito while she was absent for a limited term.

“I think when people hear the word ‘rezoning’ they automatically assume a move. And I think in this case, we were very determined about the locations that were being dezoned, ”Ayala said, noting that travel had decreased since the dezoning started. “I think that for us, the dezoning was not negative.

In the last segment of the podcast, Ayala discussed her relationship with mayor-elect Eric Adams and how she presents herself to her colleagues while trying to become the next chairman of city council.

Recognizing that she has the support in her candidacy for president of Mark-Viverito, the former president, and of the United States representative Adriano Espaillat, Ayala said that among the next class of members of the Council, as of the recording of the podcast Nov. 24, “we have a block of about seven or eight members today that are hard engagements, and then, you know, several more that have also expressed interest in supporting who are sort of trying to figure out how to work out. through some of their own internal policies.

She declined to name any of those seven or eight “hard engagements” beyond elected council member Althea Stevens, who had previously spoken to City & State of her support for Ayala.

“I see myself as a leader who will work closely with the new members,” Ayala said. “Really, really excited about the new class of new members. We have a lot of really great new talent, a lot of wonderful new ideas, just really great energy … I was very careful not to create my own platform or my own agenda. Because I think it would be irresponsible to do this without really having more solid conversations with new members about their priorities. “

As for mayor-elect Adams, who also grew up in New York City under difficult circumstances, and who works with him if she leads the council as president, Ayala said in part:

“I think for the members it is important that we maintain a level where we are the checks and balances for the administrator and that means that has to be protected at all times. But we all look forward to a working relationship with the new administration, and I’m excited about what it means. I think the mayor-elect and I have a lot in common, in terms of personal stories and education. I am very happy to see what this translates into in terms of his political work. But of course, we are here to work. We are here to get things done and we will do it as kindly as possible and as professionally as possible. But, there should be no misunderstanding that when we have to push back as a body, we will push back. “

[Listen to the full podcast episode with Council Member Diana Ayala here]

[Find Max Politics episodes with each of the seven City Council Speaker candidates here]

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