Councils ‘must have the power’ to evict a ‘small minority’ of troublemakers

More than 500 complaints about anti-social behavior at Dublin City Council properties were received last year in an area with just 4,000 council tenants.

The complaints have been received in Dublin’s northeast city centre, which stretches from the East Wall to Phoenix Park.

On average, more than 40 complaints of antisocial behavior were received each month in the region.

More than 500 complaints about anti-social behavior at Dublin City Council properties were received last year in an area with just 4,000 council tenants.

However, less than a quarter of those subject to complaints have been formally interviewed by the council. And a much smaller figure was again referred to the local authority’s central anti-social policy unit.

Dublin City Council told Extra.ie this week that only three people were evicted from their properties in the last year for anti-social behavior across the city.

It comes as the council’s housing committee met this week to consider a new draft strategy for dealing with anti-social behavior at council properties.

Councilors agreed that the power of eviction should “be the biggest weapon” in their arsenal.

“We’ve seen it in downtown north where one or two people can move into an area and just destroy things for everyone.”

Nial Ring is a councilor in Dublin’s North City Centre, who has one of the most reported anti-social behaviors in local authority-owned housing.

“We moved a family into an estate here whose son had murdered the son of another family in the compound.

Nial Ring is a councilor in Dublin’s North City Centre, who has one of the most reported anti-social behaviors in local authority-owned housing.

“The council placed the families next to each other despite being informed of the circumstances and warned of what was going to happen.

“Every time the mother of the boy who was murdered passed by the family home, they made intimidating gestures.

“Downtown North is a great place to live where the vast, vast majority are ordinary, decent people, but you get bad apples like this and it ruins everyone’s reputation.

“No one should have to put up with it. You have to get the message across, it’s not because you have a social apartment once you have the right to it for life, you have to behave yourself.

Sinn Féin councilor Daithí Doolan, who represents Ballyfermot and Drimnagh, said there were many vulnerable people in council-owned properties who preyed on others.

“We used to have the Residents’ Committee and they had a say in running the estate and it was a good system and I would love to see it again.”

Sinn Féin councilor Daithí Doolan, who represents Ballyfermot and Drimnagh, said there were many vulnerable people in council-owned properties who preyed on others.

Mr Doolan said: ‘Many drug dealers live in swanky suburban homes and take over municipal property to deal with them.’ The person in this house is as terrified as anyone else on the estate.

A Dublin City Council Housing Committee meeting recently heard of a woman who took her own life after her flat was taken over by a gang to sell drugs.

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