Society – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 11:25:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png Society – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Butte Rose Company | Snapshot – Chico Enterprise-Record https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/butte-rose-company-snapshot-chico-enterprise-record/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 11:25:05 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/butte-rose-company-snapshot-chico-enterprise-record/ Hosts for the 27th Annual Butte Rose Society Rose Show included (seated left to right) Deb Crane and Bettye-Ann Stephens, (back row) Dona Bertain, Bernice Hallowell and Karen Hansen. Over 230 visitors attended the free October 29 show held at the Chico Community Center. About 60 members of the Rose Society volunteered for planning and […]]]>

Hosts for the 27th Annual Butte Rose Society Rose Show included (seated left to right) Deb Crane and Bettye-Ann Stephens, (back row) Dona Bertain, Bernice Hallowell and Karen Hansen. Over 230 visitors attended the free October 29 show held at the Chico Community Center. About 60 members of the Rose Society volunteered for planning and daily tasks. The show included a judged rose contest, children’s activities, a fragrant rose contest and visits to the adjacent Creekside Rose Garden, which is operated by the Chico Area Recreation and Park District. The Butte Rose Society meets at 7 p.m. on the last Tuesday of the month at Chico Veterans Memorial Hall, 554 Rio Lindo Ave. For more member information, call Linda Henderson, 530-896-0339. (Photograph provided)

How to submit a snapshot

Snapshots, photos submitted by readers of community events, are posted

Monday. These can be service projects, guest speakers at club meetings, awards presented, or children completing school projects. Just make sure there are people in the photo – no more than 12 – and keep it up to date.

Send a high resolution JPG with a paragraph explaining the contents of the photo: who (in order from left to right with last names), what, where, when and why to snapshots@chicoer.com. Non-digital submissions will not be accepted at this time.

We cannot accept photos from businesses, private events, or those adorable pet photos.

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The Lorain International Festival highlights the Ukrainian community, Lorain Historical Society https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-lorain-international-festival-highlights-the-ukrainian-community-lorain-historical-society/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 23:39:05 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-lorain-international-festival-highlights-the-ukrainian-community-lorain-historical-society/ Each year, the Lorain International Association (LIA) highlights one of the many nationalities of the Cité Internationale as well as a local organization or company. The Lorain Historical Society has been announced as the featured organization and the Ukrainian community is the nationality of the 55th annual Lorain International Festival and Bazaar in the summer […]]]>

Each year, the Lorain International Association (LIA) highlights one of the many nationalities of the Cité Internationale as well as a local organization or company.

The Lorain Historical Society has been announced as the featured organization and the Ukrainian community is the nationality of the 55th annual Lorain International Festival and Bazaar in the summer of 2023.

“This coming year, the Lorain International Festival & Bazaar will shine a light on the Ukrainian community of Lorain,” according to a press release. “Ukrainians have been a vital part of both Lorain and the International Festival, from supporting two ethnic churches in southern Lorain to involving the community in civic activities and business.”

The Festival’s first queen, Irene Kychun, represented her Ukrainian heritage.

The International Festival last highlighted Ukrainian nationality in 1980.

“When we found out that Lorain’s Ukrainian community hadn’t been spotlighted in over 30 years, it felt like a natural fit given its history with the festival,” said Chris Rewak, chairman of the board. administration. “The news of the day and the solidarity that the city of Lorain has shown towards the Ukrainian people by welcoming refugees and raising funds have made it even more relevant.

“As a person of Ukrainian descent myself and hosting a Ukrainian family, I am proud to help shine a light on the culture and heritage of Ukraine.”

This is the first time that the Lorain Historical Society will be honored.

Formerly the Société d’Histoire de Rivière Noire, the Société d’Histoire de Lorain is committed to preserving the history of the town.
of Lorain for future generations, the statement said.

This includes the preservation of Lorain’s international heritage through collections of oral histories as well as archived materials about Lorain’s people and businesses.

This includes the John Milas Collection, photographs and slides taken by local photographer John Milas from the International Festival and Parade from 1967 to 2003.

“The International Lorain Association looks forward to welcoming everyone to Black River Landing in downtown Lorain,” the statement read.

The Lorain International Festival & Bazaar will take place from June 23 to 25.

The office of the Association Lorain International meets on the third Tuesday of each month.

Anyone wishing to join the board or help plan next year’s festival is welcome.

Contact Rewak at rewakcp@rewaklaw.com or Vice Chairman of the Board Ben Maniaci at sublime130@live.com for more information.

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USC Aiken Honors Legacy Society Donors | Education https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/usc-aiken-honors-legacy-society-donors-education/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/usc-aiken-honors-legacy-society-donors-education/ USC Aiken honored its Legacy Society donors with a luncheon in October. Members of the Legacy Society have included USCA in their estate and other planned giving options. Over the past year, USCA has said goodbye to three valued donors who have had a tremendous impact on the university: Dr. Al Marston, Anna Gascoigne-Nixon and […]]]>

USC Aiken honored its Legacy Society donors with a luncheon in October.

Members of the Legacy Society have included USCA in their estate and other planned giving options.

Over the past year, USCA has said goodbye to three valued donors who have had a tremendous impact on the university: Dr. Al Marston, Anna Gascoigne-Nixon and John “Coach” Abshire.

Dr. Al Marston, DuPont’s first deputy director, donated an endowment for nursing scholarships in memory of his late wife. Marston took a personal interest in the students who received these scholarships and enjoyed chatting with them about their future careers and plans. In addition to the nursing endowment, Marston also has one for chemistry.

Anna Gascoigne-Nixon made an estate gift to the university that nearly doubled the amount of scholarships for nursing students each year and enabled the university to meet the significant needs of its science students nurses.

John “Coach” Abshire and his wife, Patty, have been USCA supporters and ambassadors for many years. The iconic horse that stands in front of the campus was a gift from the Abshires. They also contributed to the School of Nursing.

USCA also welcomed two new members to the Legacy Society: Nelson Danish and Jan Ford.

Mary Jo Usher Steel, a legacy donor, was impressed with many aspects of USCA when her daughter, Ginger Hudock, became Vice Chancellor for Business and Finance in 1986. Her daughter’s time at the university encouraged her to donate to the school. Among his other gifts is the Joseph T. and Mary H. Usher Endowment.

Steel created this endowment for the music department to honor his parents and their love for music. Steel is passionate about classical music and jazz. She studied the piano and the violin before finding her vocation in amateur singing.

“I hope my financial donations will help students better experience the joys and other benefits of music,” Steel said.

Steel’s generosity inspired other members of his family to give to the university as well.

Although he is a chemical engineer who specializes in technical translation from Japanese to English, Joseph Steel, the son of Mary Jo Usher Steel, was inspired by his mother and joined her in donating to the department school performing arts.

To find out how to become a member of the Legacy Society, contact Mary Driscoll, Vice Chancellor for Advancement and External Affairs, at 803-641-3448.

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A tantalizing new exhibit opens at the New-York Historical Society – West Side Rag https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-tantalizing-new-exhibit-opens-at-the-new-york-historical-society-west-side-rag/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 11:03:40 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-tantalizing-new-exhibit-opens-at-the-new-york-historical-society-west-side-rag/ Kugel (a model), called “the sacred national dish… of Juidasm” By Meg A. Parsont and Daniel KatzPhotographs by Meg A. Parsont “I will have what she has.” This emblematic line of When Harry Met Sally Instantly transports us to a table at Katz’s Delicatessen where Meg Ryan/Sally’s ecstatic exclamations convince another diner that the pastrami […]]]>
Kugel (a model), called “the sacred national dish… of Juidasm”

By Meg A. Parsont and Daniel Katz
Photographs by Meg A. Parsont

“I will have what she has.” This emblematic line of When Harry Met Sally Instantly transports us to a table at Katz’s Delicatessen where Meg Ryan/Sally’s ecstatic exclamations convince another diner that the pastrami sandwich is clearly not to be missed. Clips from the film are just one of the many delights on the menu of “I’ll Have What She Has”: The Jewish Delian exhibit that just opened at the New-York Historical Society.

Five years in the making, the exhibit, curated by the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, reveals how Jewish delis became a cornerstone of American food culture and delves into the cultural significance of what has become the epitome of New York cuisine.

“Food is a wonderful vehicle for cultural exchange,” says Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. Co-curator Lara Rabinovitch, a specialist in immigrant food cultures, adds: “Deli is of course a New York tradition and an American history. It tells the story of adaptation and resilience.

As the press release notes, this exhibit explores how Jewish immigrants from Central and Eastern Europe imported and adapted traditions to life in the New World to create a cuisine that became a cornerstone of popular culture with a global influence.

Exhibits and signage explore the origins and evolution of Jewish grocery shopping, beginning with the 3 million Jews who came to the United States between 1880 and 1924, many of whom settled on the Lower East Side and opened humble food businesses that grew into restaurants where foods from diverse regions were all served under one roof for the first time. From pickles and pastrami, knishes and borscht to smoked fish, bagels and babka, these Central and Eastern European foods have become staples of Jewish deli meats in the United States.

As the exhibit progresses, it delves into the heyday of charcuterie between the two world wars, introduces us to Holocaust survivors who found community – and often employment – ​​in delicatessens and delicatessens in popular culture. Exhibits range from the poignant — a worn suitcase and a pair of brass candlesticks belonging to turn-of-the-century immigrants — to the delightfully kitsch, including neon signs and vintage clocks that once adorned the walls of popular Los Angeles grocery stores. Angeles, Chicago, and New York.

Mrs. Maisel’s style next to the vintage waitress uniform.

There are also costumes of The Marvelous Mrs. Maiselvintage deli uniforms, an original bottle of Dr. Brown’s Cel-Ray soda, menus, advertisements and even a miniature model of Katz’s Delicatessen.

The photographer who took the photo above is Stephen Harmon, whom you know well from WSR! He has another on Fine & Shapiro Kosher’s show, the now closed UWS deli.

There are photographs of immigrants in the 19th century around a communal table, beloved restaurants that are now closed, including Fine & Shapiro Kosher Delicatessen on the Upper West Side, and a surprising appearance by Guns ‘N ‘ Roses at the Kibitz Room bar, adjoining Canter’s Deli in Los Angeles. And of course, there are excerpts from the film that inspired the name of the exhibition!

* * *

food for thought “I’ll Have What She Has”: The Jewish Deli

“Delicatessen” is a German word that loosely translates to “a place to find delicious things to eat”.

German poet Heinrich Heine called kugel “the sacred national dish… of Judaism.”

A pastrami sandwich was $0.95 in 1961. Today it costs about $25.95.

In the 1930s, there were nearly 3,000 delicatessens throughout New York City; today there are only about a dozen left.

* * *

Laura Mart, co-curator of “I’ll have what she has”: The Jewish Deli, said: “What is more joyful than delicious food?” This exhibit is a testament to the joy Jewish charcuterie has brought to generations of Americans and the enduring appeal of this timeless cuisine. Warning: Be prepared for an irrepressible craving for a pastrami sandwich when you leave the building!

Schedule a visit:

On view from November 11, 2022 to April 2, 2023
New York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at 77th Street
https://www.nyhistory.org/exhibitions/ill-have-what-shes-having-the-jewish-deli

WSR features serious writers, like Daniel Katz and Meg A. Parsont.

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Mecosta Co. Genealogical Society hosts Military Show and Tell https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/mecosta-co-genealogical-society-hosts-military-show-and-tell/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 15:15:44 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/mecosta-co-genealogical-society-hosts-military-show-and-tell/ Submitted to Pioneer November 9, 2022Updated: November 9, 2022 10:05 a.m. Veterans will be parked outside Walmart to raise funds for American Veterans with Disabilities Chapter 18. Predrag Popovski/Getty Images MECOSTA COUNTY – The Mecosta Co. Genealogical Society will host a Show and Tell military event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, […]]]>


Veterans will be parked outside Walmart to raise funds for American Veterans with Disabilities Chapter 18.

Predrag Popovski/Getty Images

MECOSTA COUNTY – The Mecosta Co. Genealogical Society will host a Show and Tell military event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 12, at 424 N. Fourth Avenue in Big Rapids, adjacent to Recycle.

The 14th Annual Veterans Tribute is a unique opportunity for Veterans to come and bring items, or view exhibits that other Veterans bring, to show the story of their time in service to our country.

There will be a questionnaire for veterans to sign and complete so that the Genealogical Society can gather information about their service to add to its military history of the men and women of Mecosta County. The group will also receive questionnaires for local military service groups.

Area residents can also complete a questionnaire for their ancestors who served in the military.

For more information, call Maureen Nelson at 231-250-5555 or drop by the office Saturday to help us honor our area veterans.

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Dozens Gather for Kansas Herpetological Society’s 49th Annual Meeting | KSNF/KODE https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dozens-gather-for-kansas-herpetological-societys-49th-annual-meeting-ksnf-kode/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 03:04:55 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dozens-gather-for-kansas-herpetological-societys-49th-annual-meeting-ksnf-kode/ JOPLIN, Mo. – Dozens of people gathered this morning at Missouri Southern State University, capping a weekend of events for the 49th annual meeting of the Kansas Herpetological Society. That’s right, reptiles and amphibians. Missouri snake show ‘Venom Fest’ closed after cobra goes missing The Missouri Southern Student Chapter of the Wildlife Society raised nearly […]]]>

JOPLIN, Mo. – Dozens of people gathered this morning at Missouri Southern State University, capping a weekend of events for the 49th annual meeting of the Kansas Herpetological Society.

That’s right, reptiles and amphibians.

The Missouri Southern Student Chapter of the Wildlife Society raised nearly $3,000 to host the conference on Southern’s campus.

There were approximately 200 professional scientists present as well as 37 different professional organizations.

KHS awarded seven scholarships to students, totaling approximately $6,000.

“Really provides a meaningful place for our students to access other professionals. There’s no “science factory on the road” where you can get a job, and so it’s kind of a nebulous career, and so we’re creating opportunities for students to see how to become the next generation. This is ultimately what keeps science and conservation alive,” said David Penning, Associate Professor, Chairman of KHS.

“So it really opened my eyes instead of just thinking locally about what we’re doing here in Southern Missouri, what’s going on in the outside world,” said student Gabe McClain.

MSSU’s own Dr. Penning says that even though it’s an annual meeting, Southern usually only gets the chance to host the event, about every ten years or so.
It is open to anyone interested in reptiles and amphibians.

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Sandman Mystery Theater reimagined a Justice Society hero https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sandman-mystery-theater-reimagined-a-justice-society-hero/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 15:47:06 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sandman-mystery-theater-reimagined-a-justice-society-hero/ The Justice Society of America is bigger than ever, having just made his big screen debut in the movie black adam. This character’s ties to the team and much of their modern heritage stems from the similar push they got in the comics of the 1990s. That era saw the publication of one of the […]]]>

The Justice Society of America is bigger than ever, having just made his big screen debut in the movie black adam. This character’s ties to the team and much of their modern heritage stems from the similar push they got in the comics of the 1990s. That era saw the publication of one of the best going on in the 90s, although the main character’s ties to the JSA have been rather downplayed.


Sandman Mystery Theater brought back Golden Age hero Wesley Dodds, the original Sandman of the comics. The series threw him into a much darker, more grounded world and expertly portrayed several social issues of the time. With the team he later joined finally in the spotlight, here’s a throwback to DC’s other Vertigo Sand seller comic.

RELATED: Black Adam’s Justice Society once starred in a Watchmen remix


Sandman Mystery Theater Put a justice society hero in the real world

Written by Matt Wagner and Steven T. Seagle, Sandman Mystery Theater completely reimagined the debut of Wesley Dodds, the hero of the The Golden Age of Comics known as the Sandman. Set in the late 1930s, the book takes place just before Sandman joined the Justice Society, and it shows in its themes and presentation. Apart from Dodds’ recurring dreams – which are related to Neil Gaiman’s Dream The sand man – there is little supernatural or even superhuman. Sandman himself is completely human, taking hits and losing fights against normal opponents throughout the series. Wesley Dodds himself is different from the typical superhero, being a chubby, simple man, instead of a handsome figure of masculinity.

Even Sandman’s suit has been toned down, with his green suit instead turned into a muted gray color. Essentially eschewing superheroes entirely in favor of dark pulp, the series combined episodic storylines with long arcs and ever-changing characters. Chief among them was Dian Belmont, Wesley’s love interest who grows up to help him in his later missions. Not particularly driven by a cartoonish sense of justice, Dodds acts more like the vigilante Sandman due to his increasing insomnia. The hero’s cases don’t deal with monsters or metahumans, but with the overly macabre horror of very human crimes. This leads to the somewhat forgotten series’ greatest strength.

RELATED: Black Adam’s Cyclone Is Tied To One Of The Weirdest Heroes From DC’s Golden Age

Sandman Mystery Theater Immersed in the social problems of the 1930s

As with many Vertigo titles from the 1990s, Sandman Mystery Theater addressed themes and societal issues that had previously been taboo in comics and media in general. Since the series is set with the specter of Hitler’s rise in the background, anti-Semitism and racism feature prominently in the stories. The obvious route for this would have been to confront the white/black racism of the time, namely in the South, but the series instead opts for the more neglected anti-Chinese sentiment growing in 1930s New York’s Chinatown. York. Other concepts such as incest are treated in a dark, mature but intellectual way, highlighting the hidden shadows of the period.

Given all of these adult concepts, it’s no surprise that the comic keeps Wesley’s Justice Society Countrymen at arm’s length. More realistic characters such as Crimson Avenger and Blackhawk appear, and even Hourman and Starman are introduced later down the road. Ted Grant, the wild cat of boxing even gets a brief reference! It is by being generally more grounded, however, that Sandman Mystery Theater makes these appearances so special.

The book would go on to influence many other DC titles of the time, namely James Robinson’s star man. This book also took a somewhat darker look at old legends, though it was more firmly in mainstream DC continuity. Unfortunately, Sandman Mystery Theater did not have nearly the same recognition as by Neil Gaiman Sand seller book, not least because it’s been out of print for so long. That eventually changes, however, with DC releasing a Sandman Mystery Theater omnibus in 2023. Hopefully, the release of this book will help give the series – and Wesley Dodds himself – the same stature as other parts of the Justice Society legacy.

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The Pope encourages young people from Catholic Action to become “leaven” in society https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-pope-encourages-young-people-from-catholic-action-to-become-leaven-in-society/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 11:26:23 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-pope-encourages-young-people-from-catholic-action-to-become-leaven-in-society/ Pope Francis encourages the young leaders of Italian Catholic Action in their work in the parishes and urges them to contribute to the growth of the Church in fraternity. By Benedict Mayaki, SJ Pope Francis received on Saturday morning at the Vatican young parish leaders from Italian Catholic Action. Addressing them, the Pope expressed his […]]]>

Pope Francis encourages the young leaders of Italian Catholic Action in their work in the parishes and urges them to contribute to the growth of the Church in fraternity.

By Benedict Mayaki, SJ

Pope Francis received on Saturday morning at the Vatican young parish leaders from Italian Catholic Action.

Addressing them, the Pope expressed his gratitude for their care of the parishes, noting that, as he belongs to a different generation when the parish and the parish priest, was a central point of reference in people’s lives through the masses. Sundays, catechesis and the sacraments. .

He further recognized that the socio-cultural reality has now changed considerably – in other countries and in Italy – and that the mission of the Church, including the parish, has been rethought. However, one essential thing remains for everyone in their journey of faith and growth: “the parish experience has been and is important”.

The pope said that the parish “is the ‘normal’ environment where we have learned to hear the Gospel, to know the Lord Jesus, to offer free service, to pray in community, to share projects and initiatives, to feel part of God people.”

Catholic action and parish community

Thanks to Catholic Action, Pope Francis emphasized, parish leaders have had an “associative” experience linked to that of the parish community. Many, he added, have been part of Catholic Youth Action and are learning what it means to be part of a Christian community.

“It is very important: to learn by experience that in the Church we are all brothers and sisters through Baptism; that we are all protagonists and responsible; that we have different gifts and all for the good of the community; that life is a vocation, following Jesus; that faith is a gift to be given, to witness.

The Pope also affirmed the Christian’s responsibility to take an interest in social reality and to contribute, moving from indifference to attention, in the face of human misery which is almost always the result of injustices in eradicate. He said these realities of life are often learned in the parish and in Catholic Action and that many, both in the Church and in society, have carried into adulthood these things they have learned in as young people.

“So, dear young people, the Pope said, we are of different generations, but we have in common the love of the Church and the passion for the parish, which is the Church in the midst of homes, among people .”

Contribute to the growth of the Church in brotherhood

The Holy Father then recommended ways in which Catholic Action can contribute to the growth of the Church in fraternity.

First, he urged them not to be frightened even in the face of a weak community “dimension” – a social fact – which has also been aggravated by the pandemic. He noted that many young people no longer have the desire to have meetings and assemblies like 50 years ago, and in a way this is a good thing, because “Catholic Action does not doesn’t have to be a Catholic ‘Session’, and the Church doesn’t advance in meetings.”

However, he warned that individualism, closedness in small groups and the tendency to communicate “at a distance” have also infected Christian communities; we must therefore respond to it, starting with “work” on ourselves.

“Working” on yourself

The pope explained that he calls it “work” because “it is a difficult path and one that requires constancy”, because fraternity cannot be improvised and is not built solely with emotions, slogans and events. It is rather a work “that each one does on himself with the Lord, with the Holy Spirit, who creates harmony in diversity”. In this regard, he recommended that those responsible for Catholic Action reread the part of the Exhortation “Christus vivi” entitled “Paths of brotherhood”.

“The starting point is to come out of oneself to open up to others and meet them,” the pope said. It is a “relationship in which we recognize each other and we grow together”. He underlined that the fundamental reality for us is that “in the Church we experience this movement in Christ, through the Eucharist: He comes out of Himself and comes into us so that we come out of ourselves and that we are united to him, and in him we find ourselves in a new free, gratuitous, oblative communion.

“Brotherhood in the Church is founded in Christ, in his presence in us and among us. Thanks to him, we welcome each other, we support each other, we forgive each other.

The Holy Father also warned against gossip, which he called “the most serious disease in a parish community”. He stressed that he is “not a Christian” and that he is “evil because he divides”.

“leaven” in society

Pope Francis then underlined in what sense Christians become “leaven” in society, noting that if they are in Christ and animated by his Spirit, they can only be “leaven of humanity” because “Jesus Christ is the perfect man and his gospel is a humanizing force.

He supported the expression used by Catholic Action: “to be kneaded in this world”, saying that it is “the principle of the incarnation” and “the way of Jesus” to bring new life from the interior.

The Pope also urged Catholic Action leaders to allow “leaven to be leaven, salt to be salt, light to be light”, warning that we risk becoming worldly, losing the newness of Christ and to have nothing more to say or to give if we do otherwise. He added that this is what Jesus meant when on the one hand he says “You are the salt of the earth”, and he immediately warns: be careful not to lose the flavor! (cf. Mt 5,13).

Responsible and Credible Young Believers

The Holy Father then underlined another expression used by Catholic Action: “to be responsible and credible young believers”. He said that these words are embodied by saints – even young saints, and cited the examples of some Italian saints – Francis and Clare of Assisi, Rose of Viterbo, Gabriel of Our Lady of Sorrows, Dominic Savio, Gemma Galgani, Maria Goretti, Pier Giorgio Frassati, Clare Badano and Carlo Acutis.

“They teach us what it means to be leaven, to be in the world but not of the world,” the Pope said.

He also recalled the life of Pier Giorgio Frassati who was an active and enthusiastic member of Italian Catholic Action, and who showed us how to be a credible and responsible young believer.

Learning from the Virgin Mary

Concluding his address, the Pope recalled that October is the month of the Rosary and encouraged them to learn from Our Lady to “keep and meditate in your heart the mysteries of Jesus.”

“Reflect each day on the joyful, luminous, painful and glorious events of his life, and they will allow you to live the ordinary in an extraordinary way, that is to say with the newness of the Spirit, the novelty of the Gospel.

Finally, Pope Francis blessed and thanked Catholic Action for its witness and urged it to move forward with joy and courage.

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Honoring Texas history, Heritage Society luncheon was a ‘great and wonderful thing’ https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/honoring-texas-history-heritage-society-luncheon-was-a-great-and-wonderful-thing/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 16:02:08 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/honoring-texas-history-heritage-society-luncheon-was-a-great-and-wonderful-thing/ HOUSTONIANS WERE CAPTIVATED by beloved Frank Billingsley’s recounting of his family’s history at the Heritage Society’s annual luncheon, where Billingsley was the event’s emcee. He recounted how his 11-generation great-grandfather, Captain Jesse Billingsley, led his men into the Battle of San Jacinto and raised the battle cry “Remember the Alamo.” And that story was followed […]]]>
HOUSTONIANS WERE CAPTIVATED by beloved Frank Billingsley’s recounting of his family’s history at the Heritage Society’s annual luncheon, where Billingsley was the event’s emcee.


He recounted how his 11-generation great-grandfather, Captain Jesse Billingsley, led his men into the Battle of San Jacinto and raised the battle cry “Remember the Alamo.” And that story was followed by author Stephen Harrigan’s onstage appearance, giving a glimpse into the pages of Big Wonderful Thing, Harrigan’s latest book about Texas’ struggle and triumph in a land of extremes. During a chat with podcaster Ken Wise, Harrigan discussed the Spanish explorers, Comanche warriors, Tejano activists, and Texas beasts who made our state so great.

Chaired by Gwen and Ed Emmett and Angela and Will Cannady, the event also honored Gary White, who is retiring from the Heritage Society after 30 years.

Jo Furr and Harriet Latimer

Donna Vallone and Kristina Somerville

Carleta Sandeen and Fran Callahan

Carol Brooks and Steve Lucchesi

Alison Bell, Gary White and Carolyn Johnson

Jean Wilson, Tim Richey and Carla Bisong

Barry Mandel and Frank Billingsley

Nancy Willerson, Jane Wise and Caroline Hassell

Will and Angela Cannady and Gwen and Ed Emmett

Mary Maxey, Nancy Willerson and Ginger Blanton

Stephen Harrigan and Ken Wise

CC and Duke Ensell

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Oregon Humane Society opens community veterinary hospital | New https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/oregon-humane-society-opens-community-veterinary-hospital-new/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 11:40:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/oregon-humane-society-opens-community-veterinary-hospital-new/ Portland, Oregon. – For pet owners who have trouble making vet appointments, there’s a new solution. The Oregon Humane Society is finalizing construction of the largest expansion of programs and services in its 154-year history. The project, called New Road Ahead, began in March 2021 and includes two new buildings housing a community veterinary hospital, […]]]>






Portland, Oregon. – For pet owners who have trouble making vet appointments, there’s a new solution.

The Oregon Humane Society is finalizing construction of the largest expansion of programs and services in its 154-year history.







Courtesy of Oregon Humane Society

The project, called New Road Ahead, began in March 2021 and includes two new buildings housing a community veterinary hospital, an animal crime forensic center and a behavior and rescue center.

The expansion took more than seven years of planning, research and consultation with local and national partners to identify areas of greatest need.

The Community Veterinary Hospital opened on October 16 and offers a wide range of services, including preventive care, dentistry, sterilization and emergency care.







Courtesy of Oregon Humane Society

the hospitaltal is open to all pet owners and will provide subsidized care for those struggling to afford veterinary care for their pets.

The Behavior and Rescue Center dedicated to the behavioral rehabilitation of shelter animals to better prepare them for adoption and will also expand OHS’ ability to provide care for animals that have been rescued from natural and man-made disasters.

Pets that are part of OHS’ current behavior modification program will be moved from the main shelter to the behavior and rescue center in mid-November.

Animal Crime Forensic Center will be the first of its kind on the West Coast. State-of-the-art facility is designed for the collection and analysis of evidence from suspected cases of animal cruelty.

This evidence will be used to support the prosecution of animal abusers and improve OHS cruelty cases across Oregon. The Animal Crimes Forensic Center will be fully operational by the end of 2022.







Courtesy of Oregon Humane Society

“These services will be transformational for pets and people in this community and beyond,” said Sharon Harmon, President and CEO of OHS. “Our goal is to help animals stay with their families.”

The total cost of the New Road Ahead project is $39.5 million with a fundraising goal of $36 million. To date, over $34.5 million has been raised through philanthropic efforts.

The expanded programs do not replace any existing OHS programs. Instead, they are in addition to the adoption, medical, training, education and other services provided at the Portland and Salem campuses of the OHS.

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