Society – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 23:15:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png Society – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Iredell Genealogical Society to Hold Open House at New Location | Local news https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/iredell-genealogical-society-to-hold-open-house-at-new-location-local-news/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 23:15:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/iredell-genealogical-society-to-hold-open-house-at-new-location-local-news/ Membership of the Genealogical Society grew to 50 after its first year with interest generated by a series of programs featuring local historian Homer Keever, Mitchell College history professor Louis Brown, professional genealogist Mildred Miller and Iredell County natives Frank Gatton, local records manager. branch of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, and Dr. […]]]>

Membership of the Genealogical Society grew to 50 after its first year with interest generated by a series of programs featuring local historian Homer Keever, Mitchell College history professor Louis Brown, professional genealogist Mildred Miller and Iredell County natives Frank Gatton, local records manager. branch of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, and Dr. Jerry C. Cashion of the North Carolina Division of Archives and History. Society members immediately began creating family history and local history records and collecting Bible records, research papers, letters, records, and other Iredell County records that, at first were placed in the Iredell County Library.

By the end of their second year, the membership of the society had grown to 86 with Lois Schneider as newsletter editor and Carole Hartness as typist. Society member Fae Gill began writing a column for the Statesville Record and Landmark in the late 1970s. The society published a monthly newsletter to update members on society activities until October 1986. In January 1987, the society replaced its newsletter with the publication of a quarterly journal called “Tracks”, containing newly discovered historical and genealogical information about Iredell County. “Tracks” was created by Irene C. Black, Mildred Miller, Lois Schneider, Edith Walker and Madge W. Philbeck.

In 1980 the society published “The Heritage of Iredell County, 1980”, a 642-page book on family and local history. A second volume, titled “The Heritage of Iredell County, NC Vol. II, 2000”, was later published by society members Tom Winslow, Wayne and Perma Brown, Victor and Esther Crosby, Sarah Cheek, Mildred J. Miller, Mike Trivette, Viola Robertson, OC Stonestreet III, Lou Ray Cartwright, Phyllis Bailey, Edith Walker, Reverend Jamie and Nellie Gray Stimson, Susie Miller, Irene C. Black, Teresa Turner and Marty Folsom.

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Kauai Humane Society Needs Your Help To Obtain Much-needed X-ray Machine https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/kauai-humane-society-needs-your-help-to-obtain-much-needed-x-ray-machine/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 01:32:53 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/kauai-humane-society-needs-your-help-to-obtain-much-needed-x-ray-machine/ HONOLULU (KHON2) – The Kauai Humane Society (KHS) needs your help to obtain an x-ray machine essential to quickly diagnose serious medical injuries. KHS previously partnered with another organization that would outsource their x-ray machine, but it is no longer accessible. Now KHS has to raise $ 60,000 to buy its own. Receive news wherever […]]]>

HONOLULU (KHON2) – The Kauai Humane Society (KHS) needs your help to obtain an x-ray machine essential to quickly diagnose serious medical injuries.

KHS previously partnered with another organization that would outsource their x-ray machine, but it is no longer accessible. Now KHS has to raise $ 60,000 to buy its own.

Receive news wherever you are with KHON 2GO, KHON’s morning podcast, every morning at 8 a.m.

While the animal shelter is not seeing an increase in the number of animals needing x-rays, it is still important for them to secure a machine as it is used frequently, at least twice a month on average.

“We sometimes see pets being returned to the shelter because they need serious medical treatment and the owner is unwilling to take responsibility or cannot afford the treatment. Having access to an x-ray machine means we can pinpoint the medical problem with precision, ”said Caitlin Fowlkes, KHS spokesperson.

Fowlkes adds that this is useful for staff to start treatment effectively and also to provide information to partner organizations who are managing some of their medical cases.

One example she gives is a recent owner surrender case involving a dachshund dog named Marlee who was surrendered with paralyzed hind legs.

Marlee the dachshund dog. (Courtesy: Kauai Humane Society)

“Because we don’t have an x-ray machine right now, we have to do some testing done by another vet clinic to treat it,” Fowlkes said. “If we had our own x-ray machine, we would be able to perform our own up-to-date scans, track their treatment and allow their adopter to have the most recent information. ”

Fowlkes says Marlee now has a wheelchair that he enjoys riding under cover.

The x-ray machine is not only used to confirm broken or dislocated bones, but it can also detect internal injuries such as hernias. Staff can often determine a fractured bone without a scan, but the machine will display a more accurate result of the location of the fracture, allowing more precise medical treatment.

Click here to donate directly to fundraising. KHS also offers the possibility for people to buy cool x-ray prints taken in the past. The Fish Eye Kaua`i Art Gallery has partnered with the shelter for this fundraiser – the prints are matted and are accompanied by the story of the animal featured therein.

“Each impression is a scan of an important medical case that has found a happy ending thanks to KHS, or has been used as a learning tool for our veterinary technicians,” said Fowlkes.

Interested in jewelry heists gone wrong, other weird news? Discover the weird news

Each print also has a story explaining the importance of digitization. All profits go to KHS.

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Dr Kimberly A. Luse: Society Has Paid a High Price for the Pandemic from a Trauma-informed Lens https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dr-kimberly-a-luse-society-has-paid-a-high-price-for-the-pandemic-from-a-trauma-informed-lens/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 05:26:36 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dr-kimberly-a-luse-society-has-paid-a-high-price-for-the-pandemic-from-a-trauma-informed-lens/ The pandemic has taken its toll that no one has known in this lifetime. To quote a line from the Hamilton musical that sums up what happened, “The World Upside Down”. It will be a long time before we can look back to examine all the ways the world has been impacted. It’s important to […]]]>

The pandemic has taken its toll that no one has known in this lifetime. To quote a line from the Hamilton musical that sums up what happened, “The World Upside Down”.

It will be a long time before we can look back to examine all the ways the world has been impacted. It’s important to understand that this added level of stress and trauma makes it even more difficult to deal with whatever life throws at us on a daily basis. There are techniques and tools that have been proven. It starts with raising the level of awareness of what has happened and what is happening and then taking back your power. The feeling of helplessness is crippling, and the anecdote to that is knowledge and empowerment.

Recognizing and understanding that trauma has been suffered as a result of the far-reaching effects of the pandemic is the first step in helping to move the needle forward in a positive direction. What exactly is trauma? To quote Bessel van der Kolk, “trauma occurs when internal and external resources are insufficient to deal with the external threat”. One of the most confusing parts of the pandemic is that we are in uncharted territory when it comes to how to navigate it, so we have the added stressor of the unknown added to the mix. The length of time the pandemic has lasted as well as the roller coaster of emotions when surfaces of additional negative information make the burden much heavier to bear.

Dr Kimberly A. Luse

There are three types of trauma that need to be recognized and taken into account. The first is original trauma. It is an event, or a series of events, that causes a new experience of the trauma. A personal example that I can share is when my mother-in-law was diagnosed with cancer ten years ago and, after a courageous fight, passed away from her illness. It was traumatic for me, and I saw my children lose the death of someone they were close to for the very first time.

Last year my mother was diagnosed with cancer. I observed how trauma resulted not only as an original event, but as a second type of trauma presented itself. Re-traumatization This is what happens when an event triggers a trauma-based memory. We faced the loss of my mother, as well as a new outbreak because so many experiences reflected the loss of my mother-in-law years before.

The third type of trauma is indirect trauma. This is what happens to us when we are traumatized by seeing something happening to someone else. This has been particularly prevalent with the effect of real-time social media reporting events as well as trending events that are observed repeatedly. Examples include mass shootings, tornadoes, floods and wildfires as well as murders which have been broadcast live and televised. As humans, we are predisposed to absorb the pain of others.

Trauma changes us

Trauma changes us. It threatens our sense of security. By definition, security is the extent to which we are immune from fear and immune from physical or psychological harm. Trauma assails us and, left unrecognized, can permanently impair self-efficacy, which is our belief in the ability to be successful in specific situations and a sense of control. Chronic trauma, left unchecked, can actually reconfigure the way we process information. It can also lead to difficulties in fully engaging in the present and adapting to new situations.

Trauma affects us on all levels as well. Cognitively. Emotionally. Relatively. Physically. Have you heard anyone say during the pandemic that they have more time than they ever had in their workday because they don’t come to work? Yet they are less productive than they have ever been. It’s not because they woke up one day and lost their work ethic. This is a clear example of the effect of trauma. When you start your day above the baseline due to the extra load you are carrying from all the pandemic concerns, there is simply less free energy to focus on normal activities. , such as completion of tasks.

The impact is that the trauma alters our experience of reality and shatters the feeling that we can understand, deal with, and find meaning in the world. Over time, the defense mechanisms that can be triggered can manifest as aggression, rage, dissociation, and withdrawal. An example of dissociation is this phenomenon that occurs when a loved one dies and after the funeral is over, it can be difficult to remember the details of the day. The stereotype that it is positive to be tough and “lift your spirits” is actually the opposite of what research shows. In order to go through a trauma, it is necessary to recognize it, take the time necessary to go through it and use the support of people and tools that will translate into a momentum of transmission. Ignoring it will only work for a while, then the negative impact resurfaces, often more strongly.

Extend Grace

One of the best gifts we can give to ourselves and to others is to extend grace. A trauma-informed approach to care shifts from “what’s wrong with this person” to “what happened to this person”. Intervening with a trauma-informed lens must be determined and practiced. It is the recognition that a real injury is due to trauma and that probably underlies the observed behaviors. Instead of annoying yourself that you or a coworker cannot withhold information, consider that there may be difficulty with withholding information due to trauma. Human beings first react to things that are identified as dangerous. The trauma requires special attention to this detail. Relationships can be disrupted. Withdrawal can occur. The traumatization leads to a constant search for danger or the fall of the other shoe.

Self-management is a crucial part of dealing with stress triggered by trauma. Give yourself permission to step back and breathe. Acknowledge what’s going on. Validate it. Ask and extend compassion. Then make a thoughtful decision on how best to move forward. Create safe spaces in the physical, social, psychological and moral areas of your life.

The advice I often give to clients is to make a commitment to personal care plans. Quite often people put themselves last on their calendars. Days turn into weeks and weeks into months. It is as if the self-care plan is actually a placeholder for an appointment to meet the needs of everyone else. There has to be a change in thinking that personal care is expendable. It’s not. These two long years have shown an increased need to zealously keep the time necessary to look after one’s well-being. Do it for yourself. Do it for those you love. Encourage those in your sphere of influence to take a look at all the resources available to deal with trauma. Employers, encourage a trauma-informed approach to care in the workplace. There are models that embed this into the very fabric of an organization.

It is an investment worth making. In fact, it is an issue that is more critical today than ever before.

Dr. Kimberly A. Luse is Founder and President of Strategic Ethical Solutions International.


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Sanford Health and Company Executives Honor Retiring Randy Bury https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sanford-health-and-company-executives-honor-retiring-randy-bury/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 14:33:28 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sanford-health-and-company-executives-honor-retiring-randy-bury/ Holding dozens of leadership positions for over 40 years at Sanford Health and the Good Samaritan Society, Randy Bury has had an immense impact on both organizations. Bury retired as President and CEO of the Company at the end of 2021. We catch up with some of the colleagues who know him best. They share […]]]>

Holding dozens of leadership positions for over 40 years at Sanford Health and the Good Samaritan Society, Randy Bury has had an immense impact on both organizations.

Bury retired as President and CEO of the Company at the end of 2021.

We catch up with some of the colleagues who know him best. They share how Bury’s service to patients, residents, staff and communities will be remembered.

On living the mission

“I think the way Randy lived the mission each day was an experience of sacrifice. He has always sacrificed himself for the betterment of our organization and our patients. It was a constant theme in everything he did. He has always put our employees, our patients and the organization first. You saw it and you felt it. – Matt Hocks, Executive Vice President and COO of Sanford Health

“Whether it’s late nights at the medical center or you pull me away, into your office, to share your wisdom and insight with me, I will always be grateful for everything I have learned from you. I am eternally grateful for the things you have shown me and perhaps more importantly, the ability to have seen what it is like to have someone leading with integrity. – Bill Gassen, President and CEO of Sanford Health

“In any organization, especially at the highest level of the organization, trust between team members is essential. There’s no one I trust more than Randy. I think that’s why we were able to run the organization as well as we have. Build so many new programs, new buildings, develop programs, everything that we have done together and as a team. ” – Becky Nelson, former Senior Vice President and retired COO of Sanford Health

“How many people do you know who show up for an internship and, 40 years later, retire from the same company? He’s just a person who has always reached that call and reached what was presented to him for an opportunity to strengthen a different area of ​​the organization. There are a lot of departments that have been positively impacted with Randy. – Eric Vanden Hull, Vice President of Finance of the Company

“It didn’t matter if it was the best of the best days or the worst of the toughest days. The same guy showed up for work every day. For me, as a member of his team, it has always been very reassuring. I think it permeated the culture. Whereas people who might not have had the chance to work with him every day saw it and felt it too. I think it’s really important how he impacted people. – Mona Hohman, retired Sanford Health and Society executive

“I have been at the forefront of how Randy lives his faith day in and day out. From day one he has always said, “We’re here for the pitch. We are here to serve the field. We wouldn’t exist without the land and what they do every day. I don’t know if I’ve been to too many meetings where he doesn’t constantly remind us why we’re here. Certainly we have had some pretty tough days in the past 18 months. What Randy reminded us is that we truly are the hands and feet of Jesus. What we do and what we say matters every day. It is our job as leaders to uplift everyone around the Company. – Nate Schema, new President and CEO of the Company

“I first met you over 40 years ago at Augustana University. We were in the same program there in Augustana, the health care administration program. You were already kind of a legend. You were identified as someone who was going to make a difference in the healthcare industry. From that start in Augustana, I have known you throughout your career with your wife working at Good Samaritain for so many years. You have always supported operations and it has been quite difficult in recent years. From day one you have always been focused on our residents. You were focused on our people. You were focused on our facilities. – Randy Fitzgerald, Executive Director of the Society for Region 1

Messages for retired Randy

“First of all, I just want to say thank you. I want to thank you for the over 40 years of your life that you, Sonia and your boys have dedicated to making this organization an amazing place to work, an amazing place to provide care and, above all, an amazing place to entertain. care. . This organization would not be what it is today without your sacrifice, your dedication to doing good for our people, our patients and our communities. ” – Bill Gassen

“Randy, after 40 and a half years in this organization, I cannot imagine what you have seen and experienced in your dedication to this organization, our staff and the patients. I wish you a good retirement. You have arrived. You’ve pretty much been through it all. A pandemic, a hurricane, a fire in the last two years and you got by and you left it in good hands with the people you have mentored over the years. Health to you. Hope you can spend some time and relax. You more than deserve it. – Matt Hocks

“I think you are so ready for retirement and you and Sonia are going to have a lot of fun. You have always had a life outside of work and your family has always come first and work first. But you never paid attention to one or the other. You will love the retreat. I want you to relax, be happy and try to follow me in fishing. – Becky Nelson

“He’s well known to say, ‘Okay, on a scale of 1 to 10, what do you think?’ So Randy, here today I tell you without hesitation it’s gonna be a 10 and you’re gonna love your new retirement life. You really are one of the good guys. I also want to thank Sonia for sharing Randy with the organization during her career. – Mona Hohman

“I would say thank you. You have been an absolute blessing to the Society of the Good Samaritan. You have been a blessing to me. I will cherish the last two years forever. The way you framed me and brought things to the fore, pointed out things we maybe could have done a little better, and guided us where we needed to change direction halfway through. We will be eternally grateful for the gifts, talents and how faithfully you have led this organization over the past few years. – Nate diagram

“I’m happy for you. Over 40 years as an executive at Sanford, Good Samaritan Society. It’s time to let it go a little bit and enjoy your retirement. Congratulations and thank you. I’m also happy that he hasn’t. “There is now only one Randy at the National Campus. I wish you all the best with your wife and two sons in Colorado. Come see me someday. Well done, good and faithful servant.” – Randy Fitzgerald

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Sun Feng becomes the new boss of the China Classification Society https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sun-feng-becomes-the-new-boss-of-the-china-classification-society/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 09:19:03 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sun-feng-becomes-the-new-boss-of-the-china-classification-society/ The China Classification Society (CCS) has appointed Sun Feng as the new chairman and chairman, succeeding Mo Jianhui, who has retired. Sun worked at CCS Dalian branch from 1987 to December 2005. He was General Manager of the Classed Ship in Service Department since December 2005, based at CCS Headquarters, and worked as Vice President […]]]>

The China Classification Society (CCS) has appointed Sun Feng as the new chairman and chairman, succeeding Mo Jianhui, who has retired.

Sun worked at CCS Dalian branch from 1987 to December 2005. He was General Manager of the Classed Ship in Service Department since December 2005, based at CCS Headquarters, and worked as Vice President of CCS from December 2008 to December 2021. He has been in charge of almost all areas of CSC activity, including classification survey services for ships, offshore installations and related industrial products, science and technology, R&D, IT and international affairs.

Sun’s new role will primarily focus on innovation in key areas such as decarbonization, smart shipping and digitization.

“Over the past five years, the scientific and technical capabilities of CCS have improved dramatically and a number of innovative smart and environmentally friendly transportation technologies from CCS have won national awards,” he said. “We must continue to promote quality ethics throughout our organization by promoting the CCS rules and standards system, strengthening research in green and smart technologies while deepening the research and application of new technologies. investigation and accelerating digital transformation. CCS will continue to increase international communications and cooperation with institutions such as IACS and IMO. By improving our service capability, CCS will accelerate the safe and environmentally friendly development of international shipping.

Founded in 1956 and based in Beijing, CCS’s serviced fleet consists of more than 32,000 vessels. In addition to Sun’s appointment, CCS appointed Cai Yanxian as one of the four vice presidents, replacing Zhu Kai, who also retired.


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Human star Kirti Kulhari says society’s idea that women are incomplete without shaadi bacche is sh ** https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/human-star-kirti-kulhari-says-societys-idea-that-women-are-incomplete-without-shaadi-bacche-is-sh/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 08:41:46 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/human-star-kirti-kulhari-says-societys-idea-that-women-are-incomplete-without-shaadi-bacche-is-sh/ Kirti Kulhari will soon be seen in the Disney + medical thriller Hotstar Human. The series explores the murky world of human medical trials. Kirti stars as Dr Shreya Sabharwal, who is one of the youngest cardiac surgeons in the country. In an exclusive conversation with IndiaToday.in, Kirti Kulhari spoke about her upcoming show, opened […]]]>

Kirti Kulhari will soon be seen in the Disney + medical thriller Hotstar Human. The series explores the murky world of human medical trials. Kirti stars as Dr Shreya Sabharwal, who is one of the youngest cardiac surgeons in the country. In an exclusive conversation with IndiaToday.in, Kirti Kulhari spoke about her upcoming show, opened up about mental health issues and why she thinks marriage is overrated.

Excerpts from the conversation:

Tell us about your character Dr Shreya Sabharwal in Human?

Born and bought in Bhopal, Shreya comes from a lower middle class family. She was someone who decided very early on that she wanted to become a doctor because she was inspired by her father, who is a composer. He’s someone who is so sorted, at the top of their game professionally, but also someone who is not so sorted personally. She’s someone who has flaws, has her fears and insecurities, and she carries a lot of baggage. And that’s what makes her very unpredictable. She is very complex, complicated and very human. “

How much of a character is Shreya to you?

I identify with every character I play. It’s something that I learned because I don’t judge my characters and I don’t limit myself to the idea that yeh kitni meri jaise hai. What I’m trying to look for is the character in me, the traits. I will find Shreya within me and try to access that part of me that looks like or imitates Shreya or imitates the characters that I play on screen. This is my process.

How did it go with Shefali Shah?

She is a lovely actress and I was very happy to work alongside her and share the space with her. She is a complete actress, her homework is up to par, her acting is up to it. So it’s very easy to get along, it’s very easy to do your thing when the actors are doing their job, you’re just there to make the scene better. He’s someone I’ve always admired in my life.

Watch the Human Trailer Here:

From Shaitaan to Human, how was your acting career?

Of course, it took a long time. It doesn’t seem like long and it hasn’t been easy. I had to fight for myself and defend myself every moment, but I think there is nothing new about this. It has been an internal battle and an external battle – and all I can say is that I look at my life with a lot of gratitude, compassion and wisdom. It’s like you have to go through things to get to where you are today.

You mentioned gratitude, and that was also the idea behind your recent tattoo. Tell us about it

This is my 6th or 7th tattoo. It means gratitude for, of course, life in general and when I say life, life is made up of every day, every moment, every person you meet and all kinds of things you do. When I look back on life, there is only gratitude. So gratitude for everything that life has put me through – good, bad and ugly – for being here today. I really count my blessings.

You recently bought your first Royal Enfield. How did your date with the bike start?

I started riding very early in my life, like when I was 17, but I’ve always imagined bikes to be synonymous with boys. I am a great 4 wheeler. I have driven a scooter, but bikes are something I have never tried. And since last year, I had a very strong feeling that I wanted to take a cycling trip to Ladakh. I have been to Ladakh several times over the past three years and have motion sickness. I think that a bicycle is also a way of not feeling this motion sickness. I was like the main kisi ke pichhe kyun baithungi, why can’t I ride a bike? I think it all started from there. Here I am planning a cycling trip to Ladakh in June.

You also recently spoke about your mental health. Were you skeptical about this?

I do not think so. There are some things that I’m not comfortable talking about publicly, but this wasn’t one of them. I think it’s something I’m very comfortable with. Like, yeah, it happened to me. I have an idea of ​​what people with mental disorders go through. When you experience something on your own, your empathy and understanding of others who are going through it increases. I am very grateful even for this experience because this experience literally took me on a path of self-discovery, of self-healing. This is something to talk about for sure.

After your separation from your husband, you said that marriage is an overrated concept. Why do you feel this way?

Yes, I really believe it. If marriage works for you that’s fine, but if it doesn’t work for you or you don’t want it, I think life isn’t incomplete because you’re not married. I think that’s the strong conditioning that society has for girls, that’s the conditioning that I was talking about. After going through marriage, I realized that I didn’t have to spend my whole life behind the idea that marriage is the ultimate goal because it doesn’t. It’s good to be anything for as long as you want. And the same is having children too. When you are married, families put a lot of pressure. Again, this is their idea ki agar bacche nahi hai toh ek aurat complete nahi hui hai and all that sh ** if not aapki marzi hai aap shaadi karo, mat karo, separated ho jaao, divorce karo. I totally believe in individual choice and I believe YOU ARE COMPLETE with or without these ideas and conditionings attached to you.

Following Disney + Hotstar’s Human, Kirti Kulhari will be seen in 4 More Shots Please 3. The actress also has an interesting announcement in the works, which she is eagerly awaiting. The actress also has some feature films in her chat. It will surely be an exciting year for the actress.

READ ALSO | Human trailer out. Shefali Shah, Kirti’s medical drama to be released on Disney + Hotstar on January 14, 2022



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Law Society of British Columbia steps up trust account audits to monitor money laundering https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/law-society-of-british-columbia-steps-up-trust-account-audits-to-monitor-money-laundering/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 18:05:34 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/law-society-of-british-columbia-steps-up-trust-account-audits-to-monitor-money-laundering/ Breadcrumb Links News Local news “We have taken this very seriously and have tried to make sure the word is well known when it comes to the obligations regarding client identification and the rule of cash transactions and the proper administration of trust accounts. – Don, CEO of the BC Law Society Avison. Author of […]]]>

“We have taken this very seriously and have tried to make sure the word is well known when it comes to the obligations regarding client identification and the rule of cash transactions and the proper administration of trust accounts. – Don, CEO of the BC Law Society Avison.

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The Law Society of BC has stepped up audits of attorney trust accounts in recent years in an effort to watch for signs of money laundering.

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The company did so to monitor trust accounts in the absence of an obligation for lawyers to report suspicious transactions to the Canadian financial intelligence agency. Notaries and real estate agents, for example, must report suspicious transactions.

The bar carried out around 450 audits per year until 2015, but by 2019 it had grown to 675 audits per year.

During the difficulties created by the COVID-19 pandemic, the company managed to perform 636 audits in 2020.

“We have taken this very seriously and have tried to make sure the word is well known when it comes to the obligations regarding customer identification and the rule of cash transactions and the proper administration of trust accounts,” BC Law Society CEO Don said. Avison.

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“The number of circumstances in which we find ourselves in what I would generally characterize as money laundering is still very low,” added Avison, former federal Crown prosecutor and Director General of Justice Canada.

Trust accounts hold money for transactions processed by law firms and are audited at least once every six years. Some companies, which work in areas of higher risk for money laundering such as real estate, are audited at least once every four years.

The Law Society of British Columbia has also introduced the use of artificial intelligence – by running computer software to extract data provided annually by law firms – to determine if more frequent audits are needed.

In 2017, a bar court sanctioned West Vancouver attorney Donald Franklin Gurney for allowing nearly $ 26 million to flow through his trust accounts without a reasonable investigation into the circumstances of the money and without providing any substantial legal services.

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More recently, in September this year, a bar court fined Vancouver lawyer Florence Esther Louie Yen for malpractice for authorizing the use of her trust account for deposits of around US $ 10 million and C $ 1.27 million. The funds were disbursed without providing substantial legal services in connection with the transactions, and without carrying out the necessary investigations, recording the results of the investigations or recording the source of the funds, the court ruled.

Yen appealed the decision – and the bar also requested a review of his three-month suspension. The company had requested a six-month suspension.

The legal profession has been in the spotlight in recent British Columbia government commissioned reports on How to Combat Money Laundering, as well as the province’s money laundering investigation by British Columbia Supreme Court Justice Austin Cullen.

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That’s because, following a Supreme Court of Canada ruling in 2015, lawyers remain exempt from filing suspicious transaction reports with Canada’s financial intelligence agency, the Analysis Center. financial transactions and reports of Canada, known as FINTRAC, for fear that this violates solicitor-client privilege. .

But law societies across Canada, including the national organization, and the federal government have been exploring how they can step up oversight of trust accounts without violating the precedent-setting High Court ruling.

In British Columbia, this has necessitated an increase in audit and investigation staff to ensure that oversight of trust accounts is strong.

And recently, the bar became a member of the Counter Illicit Finance Alliance of BC. The 38-member organization includes the RCMP, FINTRAC, the Canada Revenue Agency and all of Canada’s major banks and some credit unions. The alliance aims to help the public sector and private industry to share information “legally” to prevent, detect and disrupt illicit financial activity.

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Avison has said he would like FINTRAC to share information with the law society.

“If there are circumstances where the things they know would be useful in investigating a case involving a lawyer, they should pick up the phone and call my office,” he said.

Even before the 2015 ruling, the Law Society of British Columbia had rules in place to fight money laundering.

These included the introduction of a no-cash rule in 2004, which prohibits lawyers, except in very limited circumstances, from receiving $ 7,500 or more in cash from a client.

And in 2008, the Law Society introduced client identification and verification rules similar in scope to federal laws, but without the requirement to report to FINTRAC.

A lawyer should verify not only a person’s full name, address and telephone number, but also the client’s profession. If the client is an organization, the lawyer should obtain and keep a record of the general nature of the type of business they engage in, as well as the name, position and contact details of the people from whom the lawyer will receive instructions.

ghoekstra@postmedia.com

twitter.com/gordon_hoekstra

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Pet adoptions rise at Sault Humane Society https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/pet-adoptions-rise-at-sault-humane-society/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 00:23:28 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/pet-adoptions-rise-at-sault-humane-society/ Sault Ste. Marie – Cats, dogs and other critters in Sault Ste. Marie Humane Society has a little more room after an active month of adoptions. Animal shelter staff say it has been a difficult year with repeated closures linked to the pandemic. It was only last month that the Humane Society took care of […]]]>

Sault Ste. Marie –

Cats, dogs and other critters in Sault Ste. Marie Humane Society has a little more room after an active month of adoptions. Animal shelter staff say it has been a difficult year with repeated closures linked to the pandemic.

It was only last month that the Humane Society took care of more than 100 cats, around 40 dogs and a number of smaller animals. However, it’s a little less cramped now after a peak in adoptions in December.

“We had 59 cat adoptions this month and eight dog adoptions,” said Lauren Smith, animal care and control officer for the Company.

“Instead of blasting overcapacity all the way, we’re sitting just below capacity right now. Which is a nice place after the last six months.”

With the surge in adoptions happening over the holidays, Smith said they’ve taken steps to ensure pets aren’t adopted as gifts.

“We select Christmas presents a lot,” Smith said. “We make sure all the families in the house know about it – there are no surprise Christmas presents. We don’t believe it.”

She said COVID-19 protocols made the adoption process a bit longer, but people were mostly sympathetic.

“We just need the request, (it) needs to be approved in advance, and then we invite you to meet the animals,” Smith said.

“We want you to choose the right member of your family and it just takes a little more work than before. But, at the end of the day, we are seeing positive adoption results because so far it has not been there is almost no return. “

Along with the increase in cat and dog adoptions, the shelter’s critter population has declined.

“We only have a few critters left internally – and a duck for some reason,” Smith said. “He got lost somehow and we’re not sure what we’re going to do with the duck.

Due to the growing number of COVID-19 cases, the Society is open by appointment only at this time.


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Our View: Restrictions, either from Society or Our Government, May Be Following Omicron | Our opinions https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/our-view-restrictions-either-from-society-or-our-government-may-be-following-omicron-our-opinions/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/our-view-restrictions-either-from-society-or-our-government-may-be-following-omicron-our-opinions/ Deceive me once, shame on you. Cheat on me twice, shame on me. But one fifth ascend? In Louisiana, the crowd that is ashamed of us is a lot of people, and not just those now familiar to hear criticize, the unvaccinated population. From just one or two cases, the highly contagious omicron variant has […]]]>

Deceive me once, shame on you. Cheat on me twice, shame on me.

But one fifth ascend?

In Louisiana, the crowd that is ashamed of us is a lot of people, and not just those now familiar to hear criticize, the unvaccinated population.

From just one or two cases, the highly contagious omicron variant has spread like wildfire across the state, with every region affected. The new variant was responsible for the majority of cases in Louisiana within just a few weeks.

And the number of cases has exploded, even as some test sites were closed for the winter holidays.

The good news is that so far many people have a relatively mild case, although it can be quite painful even at home. Events changed so rapidly in just a few days and the authorities of President Joe Biden have struggled to cope with this new crisis. There can only be speculation as to how a return to actual winter weather would hurt Louisiana more.

Our balmy days of late are not likely to continue. Any disease will thrive in closer neighborhoods, whether in the cold northern states or in slightly less cold weather in our regions, when people are further indoors.

The Louisiana Department of Health is working overtime to address issues with the omicron variant. And most of their advice is as familiar as the experience of the past two years: even people who have been vaccinated should wear masks in indoor public spaces, in any indoor space with people outside of their immediate household and away. ‘outside if it is not possible to keep at least 6 feet from others

Social distancing is back, with a vengeance.

Authorities said people who can work remotely should do so, and everyone should limit exposure to people outside their daily homes.

Everyone.

From experience, we wonder if such exhortations will be enough and authorities like Governor John Bel Edwards, who has not hesitated to do what good science recommends in this crisis, will impose additional demands.

But if we accepted it, we wouldn’t welcome it. Society is at its lowest as omicron threatens the progress made by our painful pandemic adjustments. A mask warrant isn’t a critical issue after all of this, but it’s not something that will bring joy to anyone.

Especially the vaccinated, who considered themselves for a time as a presbytery protected by elected officials during the crisis. Omicron has brought social distances back into our lives.

This is not to say that vaccination is not an extremely important way to protect yourself against the disease.

The low vaccination rate in our state is indeed criminal negligence on the part of thousands of our friends and neighbors. Many are paying for the mistake, as the health ministry has said about four in five patients in today’s growing hospitalizations are unvaccinated.

We deeply regret it. As no less than former President Donald Trump said, vaccinations and the booster must be taken by all eligible people.

With medical resources and hospitals in such strain, Trump’s statements are welcome, because in Louisiana we are trying to manage the hand that has been given to us.


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company Willkommen shares the holiday spirit with ‘Tour’ | Community https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/company-willkommen-shares-the-holiday-spirit-with-tour-community/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 13:55:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/company-willkommen-shares-the-holiday-spirit-with-tour-community/ Most people decorate one, maybe two, trees for Christmas. Members of the Willkommen Heritage and Preservation Society have decorated more than a dozen with them. This is their “Tower of the Trees” on display at the Willkommen Heritage Center at Norwood Young America until the end of December. Each tree in the seasonal exhibit has […]]]>

Most people decorate one, maybe two, trees for Christmas.

Members of the Willkommen Heritage and Preservation Society have decorated more than a dozen with them.

This is their “Tower of the Trees” on display at the Willkommen Heritage Center at Norwood Young America until the end of December. Each tree in the seasonal exhibit has a different theme and set of decorations.

There is a tree decorated with historic greeting cards and a feather tree, believed to be one of the earliest man-made trees, originally made up of green-dyed goose feathers attached to wire branches, brought to the States- United by German immigrants.

Also, a red, white and blue tree honoring veterans. And trees highlighting the hobbies of members: a sewing tree with spools of thread; a cookie cutter tree and another with handcrafted hobby horses. Also, collectible trees – one with jewelry and another “tea time” tree with tea cups.

There is a Charlie Brown tree as a tribute to the popular Charlie Brown Christmas TV show, which has aired annually since 1965. A tree made from the pages of a Sears and Roebuck catalog. Others too.

Members have been planning the “Path of the Trees” for about a month to brighten up the historic center and attract visitors, according to member and host Marcie Lein. The company was established in 2010 to preserve the past and tell stories about Norwood Young America and its surroundings.

The company currently has 54 people and five business members, and has welcomed some 330 visitors so far this year, Lein said. In addition to the permanent, rotating and seasonal exhibitions, the company also sponsors occasional “museum nights” focused on particular historical topics. Some of the most popular have been on area railways, WWII, and local cemeteries.

You can see the “Path of trees” exhibit and follow the path to other Heritage Center exhibits on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, from 10 am to 2 pm. The center is closed on Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.


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