Society – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 10:18:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png Society – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Sawtooth Society ‘Evening’ Live Saturday | Events https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sawtooth-society-evening-live-saturday-events/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/sawtooth-society-evening-live-saturday-events/ Sawtooth, a popular area of ​​the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. The not-for-profit Sawtooth Society’s annual Sagebrush Evening fundraiser is underway and will culminate on Saturday, September 24 with a live auction at the Argyros Performing Arts Center in Ketchum. This year’s Sagebrush Night will celebrate the splendor of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area and the […]]]>






Sawtooth, a popular area of ​​the Sawtooth National Recreation Area.


The not-for-profit Sawtooth Society’s annual Sagebrush Evening fundraiser is underway and will culminate on Saturday, September 24 with a live auction at the Argyros Performing Arts Center in Ketchum.

This year’s Sagebrush Night will celebrate the splendor of the Sawtooth National Recreation Area and the immense value of the land, lakes, rivers, mountains and wildlife. The 756,000-acre NARS includes three wilderness areas in Blaine and Custer counties and is located in the Sawtooth, Boulder and White Cloud Mountains north of Ketchum.






Evening poster

“The NARS is the true gem of Idaho’s backcountry,” said Kathryn Grohusky, Executive Director of the Sawtooth Society. “There are many growing threats to the NARS, and we would like to protect it in the future. “

The auction is a mainstay of the Evening showcasing exceptional items and unique opportunities. This year, Chairman of the Board Hans Carstensen and his wife, Terry, donate their 1977 Ford F-150 Ranger, nicknamed “Phil”, named after the original owner, a WWII veteran – “A true American hero whom we had the honor to know”. said Hans.

Other packages include a winter night at Pettit Lake for six, courtesy of Sue and Alex Orb, wine from Blue Farms, and fly fishing with guide Pete Erikson.

Fundraising typically raises 60% of its annual budget of $ 315,000 and covers the cost of trail work on 200 of the 900 miles of NARS trails. The group runs a youth program and conservation programs.

The Sawtooth Society also administers a grant of approximately $ 70,000 each year from the Sawtooth National Recreation Area License Plate Fund, affectionately known as the “Goat Plate”. Total funding for goat plates is approaching $ 1 million.

Guests at the event can purchase “Discovery Kits” with the items needed to “Find Your Nature”. The kits target a variety of exciting experiences: Family Adventure; Adventure hiking; and Lac Aventure. These kits are available for one to six people. People who purchase Discovery Kits will receive a pass to watch “Riders of the Purple Sage, The Making of a Western Opera,” which will air after the live broadcast. “Riders” explores the influence of the Southwest on author Zane Gray, composer Craig Bohmler and painter Ed Mell.

A component of this year’s event is an interactive ‘field guide’ featuring an NARS bingo card with stamps to check on your summer experiences, the animals and birds you see, as well as volunteer service stamps and support from the Sawtooth Society.

Founded in 1997, the Company’s mission is to preserve, protect and improve the SNRA. Over the years, this mission has been fulfilled through advocacy, preserving open spaces, strengthening NARS recreational facilities and services, and facilitating stewardship and volunteer programs in NARS.


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A modified Pandemic Flower Show returns to Newport https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-modified-pandemic-flower-show-returns-to-newport/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 16:54:35 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-modified-pandemic-flower-show-returns-to-newport/ NEWPORT, RI – Those “green shoots” everyone was talking about in the spring? Well, now it’s roses. And peonies. And the hydrangea. And they were all on display at the opening reception of the Newport Flower Show. More Palm Beach Company News here. The show and the reception, the summer social opening of the Newport […]]]>

NEWPORT, RI – Those “green shoots” everyone was talking about in the spring?

Well, now it’s roses. And peonies. And the hydrangea.

And they were all on display at the opening reception of the Newport Flower Show.

More Palm Beach Company News here.

The show and the reception, the summer social opening of the Newport County Preservation Society, returned to Rosecliff after his 2020 pandemic absence.

Pat Fernandez, Susan McKee, Governor of Rhode Island Daniel McKee and Trudy Coxe

This year’s show, Back In Bloom: A Ballroom Floral Fantasy, ”has been reconfigured in accordance with CDC advice. Live lectures, demonstrations or shopping – which drew hundreds of people to the oceanfront lawn – have been removed.

An owl made entirely of plant material

“We designed this event with the health of our visitors and staff in mind,” said Trudy Coxe, Executive Director and CEO of the Preservation Society of Newport County.

“After hosting the Newport Flower Show for 24 years and being forced to cancel it last year due to the pandemic, we wanted to do something for flower lovers who are some of our best supporters.”


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The power of civil society in a post-pandemic world – Hina Jilani https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-power-of-civil-society-in-a-post-pandemic-world-hina-jilani/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 03:03:05 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-power-of-civil-society-in-a-post-pandemic-world-hina-jilani/ A vibrant civil society is essential to the foundations of democracy – a particularly important lesson when these appear under siege. Hina Jilani On May 25, 2020, a 17-year-old girl filmed a disturbing video, which subsequently went viral, of a white policeman in Minneapolis, Minnesota, kneeling on the neck of a black man, handcuffed and […]]]>

A vibrant civil society is essential to the foundations of democracy – a particularly important lesson when these appear under siege.

Hina Jilani

On May 25, 2020, a 17-year-old girl filmed a disturbing video, which subsequently went viral, of a white policeman in Minneapolis, Minnesota, kneeling on the neck of a black man, handcuffed and lying face down on the ground in the sidewalk, for nine minutes and 29 seconds. The man, George Floyd, died that day.

For millions of people around the world, Floyd’s death was a wake-up call about the pervasiveness of systemic racism and police violence. The Black Lives Matter movement has capitalized on this growing awareness, organizing street protests in cities across the United States, which have inspired protests from France to Colombia to South Africa. And, a testament to the power of the organization, the protests have brought about real change.

The policeman who killed Floyd, Derek Chauvin, was convicted of murder and sentenced to more than 22 years in prison. But the BLM protests resulted in something bigger: the creation of an international commission, on which I served, to examine police racism in the United States. We have found that the persistent systemic racism against African Americans in the United States constitutes a crime against humanity and deserves an investigation by the International Criminal Court.

Urgent problems

It is the power and the essence of civil society. As the world attempts to “build back better” from the Covid-19 pandemic, it must be harnessed to make progress on a wide range of pressing issues, economic inequalities and inequalities in life education. racial justice and climate change.

For those who weren’t paying attention to the systemic racism or police violence before Floyd’s death, it might seem like BLM had an impact relatively quickly. But the fight has been long and difficult, and it is far from over. The same is true of other civil rights movements, which often demand a deep and lasting resilience of their participants.

Consider the women’s movement in my home country, Pakistan. For decades, Pakistani women have struggled against repressive norms, discriminatory attitudes and legislation that limited the status or rights of women. Progress has been slow and uneven, but we have held on. And the gains we have made instill the hope that continues to motivate and inform our work today.

The importance of these efforts should not be underestimated. As Nelson Mandela, this global icon of freedom, explained in 2001, “a dynamic network and a range of activities and organs of civil society” are essential to “cement the foundations” of democracy.

Alarming drift

Today, these foundations appear to be under siege. Many countries are experiencing an alarming drift towards authoritarianism. Even the most consolidated democracies face the erosion of citizens’ trust in the institutions that underpin them. Just as the pandemic has highlighted the fragility of human life, it has also highlighted the vulnerability of our democracies to another class of diseases, including political polarization and disagreement over basic facts.

Like a human body, a democracy needs proper care to stay healthy. Like a health check, civil society reveals the afflictions of a democracy before it is too late to cure them.

When international human rights principles and democratic values ​​are not reflected in people’s lives, it is civil society, organized in groups such as BLM, that sounds the alarm. This includes ensuring that authorities do not unlawfully extend or extend the emergency powers they wielded during the pandemic.

Governments have a responsibility to listen to and embrace the voices and values ​​of civil society. Rather than fear, reject or suppress their criticism, leaders must engage with them, especially the most vulnerable. But where governments shirk this responsibility, human rights defenders must continue to fight.

Courage and determination

Many wonder if civil society can survive the erosion of democracy and the slide towards authoritarianism in many countries. But this question is impossible to answer today; and trying to do so could even prove detrimental. Human rights defenders cannot afford fatalism or apathy.

Instead, we must continue to show courage and determination, like our brothers and sisters in places such as Hong Kong, Harare, Minsk and Yangon. We need to harness the energy, eloquence and anger of young people on issues ranging from inequality and racism to climate change and come up with clear and achievable roadmaps for change.


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And above all, we must not despair. As Mandela reminded us, “It always seems impossible until it’s done.

Republication prohibited — copyright Project Syndicate 2021, “The Power of Civil Society in a Post-Pandemic World”

civil society, Black Lives Matter, BLM

Hina Jilani, member of the Elders, is a lawyer at the Supreme Court of Pakistan.


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Letter: Society needs a rebook on the meaning of being American | Letters to the Editor https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/letter-society-needs-a-rebook-on-the-meaning-of-being-american-letters-to-the-editor/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/letter-society-needs-a-rebook-on-the-meaning-of-being-american-letters-to-the-editor/ What is happening in this country? Supposedly well-educated people disparage and denigrate science and research from respected institutions, while refusing to accept the results and conclusions of verifiable data analysis. Timorous political leaders have tolerated the actions of white supremacists in addition to denying the reality and refusing to take the necessary steps to ensure […]]]>

What is happening in this country?

Supposedly well-educated people disparage and denigrate science and research from respected institutions, while refusing to accept the results and conclusions of verifiable data analysis.

Timorous political leaders have tolerated the actions of white supremacists in addition to denying the reality and refusing to take the necessary steps to ensure the safety and security of the United States

Fantastic statements that would only marginally plausible at best in a superhero movie or comic book have been accepted as factual by an extremely large contingent of what should be the adult population.

This country needs to rediscover, improve and embrace compassion, consideration and respect for one another.

Our society needs a reboot, recalibration, or re-education on what it means to be an American citizen.

Letters to the editor are encouraged. Send letters to tulsaworld.com/opinion/submitletter.

Wayne Greene reads Tulsa World editorial “Factions threaten state GOP”




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Society Notebook: Instead of the exhibit, Harpswell Citizen Historians are hosting a book launch https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/society-notebook-instead-of-the-exhibit-harpswell-citizen-historians-are-hosting-a-book-launch/ Sun, 18 Jul 2021 08:00:55 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/society-notebook-instead-of-the-exhibit-harpswell-citizen-historians-are-hosting-a-book-launch/ The Harpswell Historical Society and the Merriconeag Grange had collected 20 oral histories and received a $ 2,000 grant from the Maine Bicentennial Commission to create an exhibit to celebrate the state’s 200th anniversary in 2020. When the programming was canceled due to the pandemic, the people of Harpswell knew exactly what to do with […]]]>

The Harpswell Historical Society and the Merriconeag Grange had collected 20 oral histories and received a $ 2,000 grant from the Maine Bicentennial Commission to create an exhibit to celebrate the state’s 200th anniversary in 2020.

When the programming was canceled due to the pandemic, the people of Harpswell knew exactly what to do with the stories and the funding: publish a book.

“It was everyone’s idea pretty much at once,” said Lili Ott, co-author of “Glimpses of Harpswell Past and Present: Stories Celebrating Maine’s Bicentennial”.

As proof that many hands do lighter work, 42 ​​contributors have written, edited, and published a 308-page collection on all things Harpswell. Just over a year later, this fishing town of less than 5,000 held a well-attended book launch on July 11, with half of the first print run of 500 sold before sunset.

“It’s a beautiful book,” said Helen Wild, whose husband, Paul, wrote two poems. “It’s one of those books that you can just pick up and read little bits and pieces.”

Sam W. Alexander, a member of the Bicentennial Committee whose family has been at Harpswell for nearly 300 years, has written a chapter on fellowship organizations. Landscape architect Deane Van Dusen wrote a chapter on architecture. Becky Gallery, who volunteers with the Harpswell Garden Club, Harpswell Heritage Land Trust, Harpswell Invasive Plant Partnership and Elijah Kellogg Church, has written a chapter on volunteering.

Dick Moseley turned a chapter on business history, which he summarized at the launch of the book with pragmatic brevity: “Work in the woods, farm, fish, feed and shelter.

And, of course, there are these personal stories.

Ed Johnson, 93, recounts the day he was wounded in battle in Korea in 1952 and how he received his Purple Heart 60 years later. At the Grange last Sunday, Johnson visited friends, family and neighbors in his Korean veteran hat. His daughter Laurie Smith purchased five copies of the book: one for each of Johnson’s grandchildren.

“We were all born here,” Smith said. “Here we go back five generations. As each generation dies we lose stories, so having them recorded like that is a real treasure. I want them to have a piece of this story.

Copies are available for $ 18.20 at Gulf of Maine Books in Brunswick, Pammy’s Ice Cream on Harpswell Neck, Holbrook’s Store in Cundy’s Harbor, Island Candy Company on Orr’s Island and at the Harpswell Historical Society on Sundays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. .

“Every penny goes to the town of Harpswell with the profits shared between the historical society and the Barn,” said Ott. “The response has been quite positive with very strong sales, so we’re already talking about a second impression. “

Amy Paradysz is a Scarborough-based freelance writer and photographer. She can be reached at [email protected]


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Danish Siddiqui’s work reflected the uncomfortable truths of society https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/danish-siddiquis-work-reflected-the-uncomfortable-truths-of-society/ Sat, 17 Jul 2021 13:29:20 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/danish-siddiquis-work-reflected-the-uncomfortable-truths-of-society/ “I never push my luck to the limit. I always keep a tampon that helps me come out with the pictures that tell the story, ”said photojournalist and Pulitzer Prize winner Danish Siddiqui. Reuters about his image of a Muslim man beaten by a mob in the Delhi riots who was featured in Reuters Photos […]]]>

“I never push my luck to the limit. I always keep a tampon that helps me come out with the pictures that tell the story, ”said photojournalist and Pulitzer Prize winner Danish Siddiqui. Reuters about his image of a Muslim man beaten by a mob in the Delhi riots who was featured in Reuters Photos of the Year in 2020.

On July 16, 2021, the footage returned to tell the story, but Siddiqui tragically did not. He was killed while reporting with Afghan security forces fighting the Taliban in Kandahar.

Over the past few years, but especially in 2020 and then in the summer of 2021, Siddiqui has photographed some of the most evocative scenes of the migrant crisis in India, the riots in Delhi as well as the deadly second wave of Covid-19 in the country. In an age when millions of images are produced on smartphones every day, news photography struggles as a stand-alone profession and the truth is hard to find in the media, Siddiqui’s work has remained true to the rigor. good old-fashioned photojournalism – tell it like it is.

Perhaps that is what sets it apart from most others in the field. There was no time for instant judgments or prejudices in Siddiqui’s photographs. His work was a mirror of the uncomfortable truths in society that authorities were forced to notice and contemporaries were forced to admire.

Siddiqui had been working in silence for a decade and came into the limelight in 2018, when he received the Pulitzer with his colleagues from Reuters for their coverage of the Rohingya crisis in Bangladesh.

On January 30, 2020, his photograph of a teenage shooter, now identified as Ram Bhakt Gopal (as he identifies himself), opening fire on protesters protesting against the Citizenship (Amendment) Act or CAA, near Jamia University Milia Islamia in Delhi has gone viral. It was an unforgettable portrait of blind rage and community hatred out of control. A photograph for the ages, although it did not come without its ethical and legal implications as the suspect was allegedly a teenager and the face was blurry / left on paper in a few posts, including this one.

Just a month later, community riots broke out in Delhi following the same protests and Siddiqui managed to navigate his way, this time with a bloody photo of a bleeding Muslim as he was mercilessly attacked by a crowd in Delhi. In a talk he gave at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club in New Delhi four days later, Siddiqui spoke of this image and of being trained to shoot in hostile environments. He had moved away from this scene shortly after photographing it to avoid being attacked.

Soon after, Mohammed Zubair, the man in the photo, told a nationwide daily that he couldn’t bear to look at the photo – it made his legs tremble in pain. Siddiqui tracked down Zubair after this story was posted and met him again, photographing him a second time as Zubair recuperated at a relative’s house. He monitored Zubair’s recovery in the following days and apologized to him, saying he regretted walking away from the scene without being able to intervene in the ongoing attack.

Amid the grave and inevitable ethical implications of photojournalism and the questionable afterlife of viral images, Siddiqui has tried to reflect the truth relentlessly, keeping his conscience in check.

Earlier this year, his photographs of hundreds of funeral pyres from the deadly second wave of the Covid-19 crisis in India, where people struggled to obtain oxygen cylinders to save loved ones, made s sit the world and notice India’s biggest audience. health crisis. The publication of these images of burning pyres was debated due to their sensitive content, but there comes a point when news photography finds itself in the crosshairs if it threatens to show the uncomfortable truth. The Danish Siddiqui lived with this threat – he even died for it.

paroma.mukherjee@htlive.com

Opinions expressed are personal


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New Milford Historical Society, the museum is looking for volunteers to visit the cemetery https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/new-milford-historical-society-the-museum-is-looking-for-volunteers-to-visit-the-cemetery/ Fri, 16 Jul 2021 14:01:15 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/new-milford-historical-society-the-museum-is-looking-for-volunteers-to-visit-the-cemetery/ NEW MILFORD – Actors / actresses who volunteer to play various historical figures are needed for an upcoming tour of All Hallows Cemetery in New Milford. The annual event will be hosted on October 9 at the New Milford Center Cemetery by the New Milford Historical Society & Museum, the New Milford Public Library and […]]]>

NEW MILFORD – Actors / actresses who volunteer to play various historical figures are needed for an upcoming tour of All Hallows Cemetery in New Milford.

The annual event will be hosted on October 9 at the New Milford Center Cemetery by the New Milford Historical Society & Museum, the New Milford Public Library and the Center Cemetery. The visit will be highlighted by visits with many prominent citizens from New Milford’s past to their respective graves.

Volunteers are also needed to be costumed tour guides, to help with setup, to help with costume and make-up, and a variety of other tasks. If you’re interested, call the museum at 860-354-3069.


For those who wish to take the tour, pre-registration is available by calling the museum or by calling the library at 860-355-1191.


Donations will be accepted for the benefit of the Center museum, library and cemetery.

The museum, located at 6 avenue Aspetuck, is now open to visits and researchers by appointment only until further notice following a closure for more than a year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Protocols for all clients will be in place, including the wearing of masks and the use of hand sanitizer.

Hours are Tuesday to Friday from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

For more information, call 860-354-3069 or visit www.nmhistorical.org.


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The Historical Society celebrates summer with a temporary “crystal fountain” https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-historical-society-celebrates-summer-with-a-temporary-crystal-fountain/ Thu, 15 Jul 2021 09:12:18 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-historical-society-celebrates-summer-with-a-temporary-crystal-fountain/ The Garland County Historical Society is celebrating past summers with a temporary “crystal fountain” in front of its building at 328 Quapaw Ave. The fountain image has been enlarged from a postcard that features a well-known Hot Springs landmark. “We hope people will ‘watch this space’ to see more classic images of Hot Springs in […]]]>

The Garland County Historical Society is celebrating past summers with a temporary “crystal fountain” in front of its building at 328 Quapaw Ave.

The fountain image has been enlarged from a postcard that features a well-known Hot Springs landmark. “We hope people will ‘watch this space’ to see more classic images of Hot Springs in the future,” said Julie Brenner Nix, president of the company, in a press release.

“The Crystal Fountain was chosen as our first seasonal exhibit because it is so iconic. We placed the colorful and historic sign near the street to make it accessible to the public, who are invited to park in our parking lot and to walk on it to take a selfie or take a family photo by the crystal fountain, ”Bitty Martin, vice president and head of outreach at the Historical Society, said in the statement.

The Crystal Fountain was located at the intersection of Whittington, Central, and Park Avenue, “which has been the site of interesting structures since the early days of Hot Springs. In 1899, the Columbia Club, run by Sarah (Mrs. Prosper) Ellsworth , built a pavilion that housed a cold water fountain in the middle of the intersection, “the statement said.

In the early 1900s, the Hot Springs Railway Company replaced the first pavilion with one that housed passengers waiting for carts.

“It was a busy transfer point for passengers to and from popular Whittington Park,” the statement said. “When the carts were replaced by buses in 1938, the pavilion became a bus stop. In 1944, the pavilion collapsed when a truck slipped aside one of the support columns. The owners The truck paid for the pavilion’s restoration, but the increase in automobile traffic at the intersection made it a dangerous place for pedestrians. “

The Kiwanis Club raised $ 5,000 for a fountain that replaced the pavilion in 1952. Called the “Fountain of Youth,” its inauguration featured a combined marching band from the Navy, Army and General Hospital of the Navy, numerous dignitaries and a program telling the story of Hot Springs. Distinctive Arkansas crystals and other state minerals were added in 1952. Looping around the crystal fountain was a ritual for a generation of teenagers on Friday and Saturday nights in the 1950s and 1960s, according to the press release.

The crystal fountain was replaced by the current one in 1971 by EM “Mac” Bush of Bush Construction Company in memory of his late wife, Alice Bush.

The Garland County Historical Society is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

This 1950s postcard is featured on a newly installed sign in front of the Garland County Historical Society building at 328 Quapaw. The map shows the crystal fountain that adorned the junction of Central, Park and Whittington avenues from 1952 to 1972. – Photo submitted


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Dunedin Music Society receives top ranking for nonprofits https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dunedin-music-society-receives-top-ranking-for-nonprofits/ Tue, 13 Jul 2021 23:55:24 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dunedin-music-society-receives-top-ranking-for-nonprofits/ DUNEDIN, FL – The world’s largest source of information on nonprofits has given the Dunedin Music Society its highest rating. Guidestar commended the Dunedin Music Society for going above and beyond to be transparent about its business and finances. Guidestar is the # 1 philanthropic research database designed to find the best charities to get […]]]>

DUNEDIN, FL – The world’s largest source of information on nonprofits has given the Dunedin Music Society its highest rating.

Guidestar commended the Dunedin Music Society for going above and beyond to be transparent about its business and finances.

Guidestar is the # 1 philanthropic research database designed to find the best charities to get involved with and support.

The Dunedin Music Society has been awarded the Guidestar Platinum Seal for 2021, the highest ranking possible, due to its strategic plan to ‘Recover, Rebuild and Reconnect’ and for using the Geneva Emotional Musical Scales metrics to determine the effects live music to the audience and performers.

Dunedin Music Society

New residents to the area continue to reach out to society, seeking opportunities to perform, learn music or attend concerts in person.

The music company has been performing outdoor and live performances since October, and the Dunedin Concert Band recently presented their second indoor performance this year in the presence of Dr Jeff Traster, the composer of “Declaration”, which was performed during the event. of the concert.

“What an enthusiastic crowd and a breath of fresh air to experience greater normalcy on the path to the arts revival,” said Traster.

More than half of the audience were newcomers to music society events.

The Dunedin Music Society began as the Dunedin Concert Band in 1981. In 2014, the City of Dunedin Parks and Recreation Department asked the Society’s Chief Executive Officer, Stephen P. Brown, to assume the leadership of orchestra and create a nonprofit 501 (c) (3) public charity for financial accountability.

Instead of just signing the Florida state model form, it took a steering committee of artists, park staff, members of the public, and residents 18 months to develop a constitution and bylaws. It was during this process that the organization was renamed Dunedin Music Society to avoid being limited to one group.

Dunedin Music Society

Since its incorporation in December 2016, the music company has grown to include four ensembles, including the Dunedin Concert Band, Florida Symphonic Winds, Pinellas Community Players and Rhythm Kings Jazz Orchestra, and eight ongoing and annual programs including the Pinellas Festival. of Community Bands, Virtual Group Festivals and a 2022 European Tour.

The company has a comprehensive membership program, including a VIP Maestro’s Circle, a growing group of supporters who receive VIP privileges, including perks and invitations to company cocktails. Each circle option consists of two people in the same household, or one person and one guest.

The Music Maker program includes local businesses and businesses that support society by sponsoring events, workshops, programs, and promotions. Individuals, businesses, organizations and corporations can choose from six sponsorship packages.

The company also launched its first fundraising campaign called “COVID Catch-Up Challenge.

An organization made up of artists, audiences and community advocates, the Dunedin Music Society’s sustainable development goals include good physical and emotional health and well-being, quality education, economic growth and equality with maximum transparency.

Concerts, rehearsals, workshops and festivals take place at venues that comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, such as the Dunedin Community Center and the Pinellas Park Performing Arts Center and Palladium at St. Petersburg College . Wheelchair accessible viewpoints are available at all sites.

Upcoming events include:

This is a true community set that has grown steadily over the past few years, thanks to the dedication of advanced players ready to help and encourage others, as well as newbies eager to learn how to improve themselves. .

Led by Derek Currier, this intermediate instrumental ensemble gives adults the opportunity to recharge their love of the stage and share their love of live music once again.

The concert is free but donations will be accepted. Click here to sign up.

The concert will feature music by Copland, Menken, Gorb and Smith. Click here to sign up.

The concert is free but donations will be accepted. Click here to sign up.

Dress up and dance this holiday season with the Rhythm Kings Jazz Orchestra.

The group will perform a medley of Tchaikovsky’s holiday tunes in Berlin, as well as the Dreidl Dance, Secret Agent Santa, Walk in the Air, selections from The Nutcracker Suite, White Christmas, Holiday portraits and the ultimate Christmas carol.
General admission is $ 15. Society members can log in and register to reserve seats up to three days before the performance.

For more information, visit the website or call 727-800-3727.


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Lynchburg Humane Society is currently caring for 445 cats and kittens, “in urgent need” of foster families and adopters – WFXRtv https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/lynchburg-humane-society-is-currently-caring-for-445-cats-and-kittens-in-urgent-need-of-foster-families-and-adopters-wfxrtv/ Mon, 12 Jul 2021 11:48:23 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/lynchburg-humane-society-is-currently-caring-for-445-cats-and-kittens-in-urgent-need-of-foster-families-and-adopters-wfxrtv/ Gleaning for the World provides relief from natural disasters New / 25 minutes ago Video The Lynchburg Humane Society is currently caring for 445 cats and kittens, “in urgent need” of foster families and adopters New / 28 minutes ago Video Papa Gallo Cocina Mexicana to Join New West End of River Ridge Mall New […]]]>

Gleaning for the World provides relief from natural disasters

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The Lynchburg Humane Society is currently caring for 445 cats and kittens, “in urgent need” of foster families and adopters

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Papa Gallo Cocina Mexicana to Join New West End of River Ridge Mall

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Friday Night Jamboree returns to Floyd Country Store after 15-month hiatus

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Hearing set for Covington man charged in riot on Capitol Hill

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UPDATE: Franklin County man charged after grandchild died from reported fall; death ruled a homicide

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Roanoke city councilor turns into authorities; faces embezzlement charges

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Launch of Virgin Galactic

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UPDATE: Volvo Trucks resumes production at its Dublin plant

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UPDATE: The Medical Examiner’s Office reports that two people were found dead in Henry County’s home who died of natural causes

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This year’s Salem Fair ends Sunday; organizers discuss changes from 2021, expectations for 2022

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Six children injured in golf cart incident at Jellystone Campground in Rockbridge County

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