Social stratification – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 12:45:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png Social stratification – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 What happened to the Middlebrow culture? https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/what-happened-to-the-middlebrow-culture/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 12:45:59 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/what-happened-to-the-middlebrow-culture/ Somewhere between mass culture and elite culture lies a murky, often maligned, in-between culture. Often ridiculed as pretentious and bourgeois and decried as mediocre, pedestrian, conformist, and second-rate, middlebrow culture reached its peak between the 1930s and 1950s, when many newly-middle-class American adults sought to obtain a semblance of cultural polish and social prestige. through […]]]>

Somewhere between mass culture and elite culture lies a murky, often maligned, in-between culture. Often ridiculed as pretentious and bourgeois and decried as mediocre, pedestrian, conformist, and second-rate, middlebrow culture reached its peak between the 1930s and 1950s, when many newly-middle-class American adults sought to obtain a semblance of cultural polish and social prestige. through the Book of the Month Club or the Story of Civilization books by Will and Ariel Durant and various popular works that summarized science and history – a topic covered extensively in Joan Shelley Rubin’s classic 1992 study, The creation of the middlebrow culture.

At its height, middlebrow culture bridged the gap between avant-garde and kitsch, garish, overly sentimental and vapid, schlock and between elite and pulp fiction, ivory tower, obese academic writing and trashy, highbrow music and popular tunes and jingles. The goal of middle culture was to introduce unequally educated adults to somewhat diluted versions of high culture in an accessible, engaging, and non-threatening way.

Nothing seemed to symbolize the triumph of middlebrow culture better than the eclecticism of The Ed Sullivan Showwhich combined comedy, puppetry and rock ‘n’ roll with ballet dancers, classical music performances and operatic sopranos and tenors.

The Golden Age of American Musical Comedy, especially the shows of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein, with their exuberant mix of romance, nostalgia, moral seriousness and complicated take on race, gender and sexuality, illustrated the middlebrow. Anything but avant-garde, many of these works represented an amalgamation of various high and low artistic and musical traditions, Viennese operetta, waltz rhythms, British dancehall, vaudeville and musical revue.

The Middlebrow culture never fully faded and could be seen, even in the 1950s and 1960s in the College Bowl radio and television quiz shows and in the 1960s and early 1970s in the Youth Concerts of Leonard Bernstein and Julia Child. The French cook television series, or in the 1980s and 1990s in Merchant-Ivory film productions of classic late 19th and early 20th century novels. Today, remnants of the middle culture linger, evident in PBS’s American Masters series or Oxford University Press’s Very Short Introductions book series and even on the game show. Danger!

But in today’s status-conscious society, where educational and cultural capital is often associated with attending private universities or highly selective liberal arts schools, an ease with theorists like Pierre Bourdieu and Thomas Piketty and vigilance to anything that smacks of partiality, to be middlebrow must be dismissed as awkward in taste, coarse in sensibility, and hopelessly behind the times. You might as well wear a leisure suit or a dress in off-the-shelf synthetic materials from the late retailer Robert Hall.

Yet, as someone who views in-between culture as an impressive and admirable attempt to create a truly open democratic culture that sought to make the modern, high-end, and avant-garde widely accessible, its decline is a subject of regret. I have personally adored middlebrow theater and literature and regard them as among this society‘s greatest contributions to the arts and letters and believe that its demise represents a true cultural loss.

Admittedly, the culture in between was Eurocentric and insufficiently responsive to issues of race and gender, although the culture of Richard Wright native son was a Book of the Month Club selection in 1940. Middlebrow culture also contributed to the mid-century illusion of a unitary society. Yet what has replaced it – a highly fractured and stratified society in which large swaths of the performing arts are under threat, false populism reigns and familiarity with canonical works of literature, art and music is increasingly reserved for the privileged – does not seem to me to be a sign of progress.

It was a seminal essay published in 1915 by literary critic and historian Van Wyck Brooks that first painted a portrait of an American culture torn between scholarly and scholarly ideals – by Jonathan Edwards and his successors on one side and Benjamin Franklin and his offspring on the other. . It was a culture divided between literary English and slang, between the adamantly pretentious and abstractly inclined professor and the rude, vulgar, cynical and intellectually contemptuous businessman.

What this society desperately needed was “a middle ground between vaporous idealism and self-interested practicality” that would bridge the gap between top and bottom.

What might such a middle plane look like today if we were to embrace it as a cultural ideal?

Joseph Horwitz’s recent Dvořák’s prophecy: and the thwarted fate of black classical music indicates a response.

Horwitz, a prominent historian of American classical music, begins his book with a statement by the Czech composer in 1893: That “the future music of this country must be founded on” African American and Native American traditions. “This must be the true foundation of any serious and original school of composition to be developed in the United States.”

Horwitz argues that from the beginning of the 20th century a divide developed between high art music and high art pop music. The American classical music establishment embraced European modernism, with its rejection of traditional tonality, melodies, forms, and metrical rhythm and its interest in atonality, polytonality, and wild experimentation.

At the same time, established institutions showed little respect for vernacular, black, ethnic, and folk traditions and largely refused to play music by black composers or employ black musicians. The results manifest themselves today in the dwindling audience for classical music combined with a kind of creative stagnation that desperately needs an infusion of the dynamism and vitality that characterizes American popular music.

According to Horwitz, the answer lies in drawing from the full range of American musical traditions: African American sadness songs, ragtime, blues, gospel, jazz and more contemporary black genres, but also folk songs, band music, hymns religious and popular songs. from Broadway, Tin Pan Alley, the Brill Building and many more.

In 1925, Harold Ross, the new yorker‘s founding editor, enunciated the vision of his magazine: it would be sophisticated and urban but not highbrow. Unlike a journal, it would be interpretive rather than stenographic. It would provide a guide to theatre, motion pictures, musical events and art and exhibits worth seeing and pass judgment on new books of significance and assume a reasonable degree of enlightenment among its readers. Its “general tenor will be cheerfulness, wit and satire…”

Ross concluded this statement with a classist and sexist sentence that nevertheless remains deliberately provocative: “the new yorker will be the unedited magazine for the old lady of Dubuque.

More than three decades ago, cultural historian Lawrence W. Levine described the emergence of a rigid cultural hierarchy in America. He demonstrated that the boundaries between the serious and the popular that this society takes for granted as fixed, immutable, inevitable and enduring are in fact social and cultural constructs “shaped by class prejudice and ethnocentric anxiety”.

His Intellectual/Weak revealed a mid-19th century culture “less hierarchical, less fragmented into relatively rigid groupings of adjectives”, discrete spaces and distinct genres “that their descendants were to experience”. Levine rightly views the development of cultural hierarchy and the sanctification of high culture as a tragedy. As audiences fragmented and segregated, popular and elite audiences lost touch with the very sources of energy and creativity that would surely enrich the expressive culture of the nation.

Colleges and universities, it seems to me, should play a leading role in combating cultural stratification by doing much more to expose students to the richness and range of artistic, musical, lyrical traditions and theater that surround them. In previous articles, I have mentioned Hunter College’s HUM 20010: Exploration in the Arts as an evolving model. This course combines visits to museums and performance halls with signature seminars and opportunities for undergraduate students to interact with artists, playwrights, musicians and performers.

I invite you to follow this example. Expose your undergraduate students to the scope of expressive creativity; encourage them to apprehend the arts in their rich diversity and infinite variety. After all, a true college education is not just about cognitive development and professional training. It must also educate the senses and sensitivities.

Steven Mintz is a professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin.

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Letter to the Editor: Class Inequality Still Present https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/letter-to-the-editor-class-inequality-still-present/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:55:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/letter-to-the-editor-class-inequality-still-present/ A friend who lives in India told a story. In his mother’s time (my friend is a grandfather), the “untouchables” had to wear brooms hanging from their hair or around their necks to wipe their footprints on the paths. We find it horrible and disgusting. That could never happen here in the United States, a […]]]>

A friend who lives in India told a story. In his mother’s time (my friend is a grandfather), the “untouchables” had to wear brooms hanging from their hair or around their necks to wipe their footprints on the paths.

We find it horrible and disgusting. That could never happen here in the United States, a nation built against social stratification and stagnation. A nation where anyone can rise above their birth station, even to become president.

Yet that is exactly what we have become. It has gone beyond hypocrisy to become a caste system. Legislatures and Congress pass laws that they themselves have no intention of obeying. While smugly proclaiming a liberal, welcoming to diversity, equality for all ethnicities, races or religions, in practice they act in opposite ways.

The governor of Florida transported fifty illegal immigrants to the wealthy enclave of Martha’s Vineyard, which prides itself on being a “sanctuary region” where a former president owns an $11 million mansion. Also where signs proclaimed “hate has no place here”, the National Guard was immediately called in to expel the illegal immigrants, which was done within 48 hours.

People also read…

It doesn’t stop there. The list of privileges for the upper caste goes on and on: masking and distancing for you, but not for me. Scandals for you, not me (helped by mainstream media and big tech). No trade with Communist China for you, not for me. Armed guards for me—pay off the police for you and so on.

What can be done to eliminate the caste system in the United States? I do not know. A “red wave?” A national Christian revival to return to the values, ethics and morals of the middle class of the past? All I can do is pray.

Bob Dorsey, Pleasant Prairie

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VIC Foundry Receives NIH Grant for Development of Ultrafast Protein Biomarker Detection Instrument https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/vic-foundry-receives-nih-grant-for-development-of-ultrafast-protein-biomarker-detection-instrument/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 11:01:15 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/vic-foundry-receives-nih-grant-for-development-of-ultrafast-protein-biomarker-detection-instrument/ “We are thrilled to receive NIH funding for this high-impact technology that can help researchers develop new diagnostics and treatments across a wide range of conditions,” said Calvin Goforth, CEO of VIC Foundry. FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (PRWEB) September 20, 2022 VIC Foundry, in collaboration with the University at Buffalo, received a $259,000 grant from the […]]]>

“We are thrilled to receive NIH funding for this high-impact technology that can help researchers develop new diagnostics and treatments across a wide range of conditions,” said Calvin Goforth, CEO of VIC Foundry.

VIC Foundry, in collaboration with the University at Buffalo, received a $259,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program. STTR grants support research and development to reduce the risks associated with new technologies that have significant commercial potential.

The grant will help VIC Foundry develop a microwave microreactor for the in situ capture and digestion of target proteins, taking advantage of an extraordinary accelerating effect of a unique microwave resonator on binding rates and pyrolytic reaction. The microreactor can be coupled directly to mass spectrometry for ultra-fast (near real-time) and unambiguous detection of protein biomarkers.

“We are thrilled to receive NIH funding for this high-impact technology that can help researchers develop new diagnostics and treatments across a wide range of conditions,” said Calvin Goforth, CEO of VIC Foundry.

Proteins are the most important and established class of biomarkers for clinical diagnosis, monitoring and management. In the diagnosis, risk stratification and management of many life-threatening diseases/conditions such as myocardial infarction, every minute counts and the unambiguous detection of relevant protein biomarkers is crucial. Unfortunately, the workflow of the current approach – mass spectrometry – is hampered by the sample preparation process. Microwave reactor technology will address this important limitation.

The proposed technology and product will streamline the workflow of protein mass spectrometry analysis, free end users from multiple laborious and tedious sample preparation steps, and enable near real-time and unambiguous detection of protein biomarkers, as well as therapeutics, drug targets, and more.

About VIC Foundry

VIC Foundry is a part of the VIC innovation ecosystem which includes VIC Tech, VIC Investor Network and various associated programs such as VIC Fellows. VIC Foundry develops technologies that have substantial potential impact and commercial promise, but require further development before private equity funding. VIC Foundry further develops promising technologies by accessing various grant funding opportunities. After the grant-funded project is successfully completed, a new company is created, VIC places an initial management team, and the VIC investor network makes a founder investment in the newly created company. To learn more, visit vicfoundry.com

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Be just, fair to all, a cleric urges Nigerians https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/be-just-fair-to-all-a-cleric-urges-nigerians/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 14:38:47 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/be-just-fair-to-all-a-cleric-urges-nigerians/ 1 Rev. Gabriel Dung, assistant parish priest of St Finberrs Catholic Church, Rayfield, Joseadvised the rulers of the country to be fair and just at all times. 2 Dung, who gave the advice in his Sunday sermon in Jos, argued that Nigeria was going through difficult times due to the injustice of social stratification. 3 […]]]>

1 Rev. Gabriel Dung, assistant parish priest of St Finberrs Catholic Church, Rayfield, Joseadvised the rulers of the country to be fair and just at all times.

2 Dung, who gave the advice in his Sunday sermon in Jos, argued that Nigeria was going through difficult times due to the injustice of social stratification.

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3 It charges Christians, especially those in public office, to be exemplary in the performance of their duties.

current nigerian news today

4 The cleric, who denounced the wave of injustices in workplaces, homes, schools and other places in society, warned that God hates such practices.

5 “Part of the challenges affecting the growth of this nation is the lack of justice and fairness, especially from our leaders.
“One of the reasons God was angry with the people of Israel was because there was injustice among the people and that is exactly what we see in our generation.

6 “So, I call on all of us to avoid injustice and embrace justice and fairness in our dealings with God and our fellow human beings.

seven “We have to put aside selfishness and support each other, especially the less privileged and that makes our society better,” he advised.

8 Dung also called on leaders at all levels to be accountable to God and the people they serve, pointing out that such a decision builds people’s trust in the leader.

9 The cleric, however, advised Christians to pray for leaders, adding that leadership comes with many challenges.

ten The priest also advised Christians to refrain from deceiving others just to maximize profit.

NewsSourceCredit: NOPE

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The State and Science of Value-Based Care https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-state-and-science-of-value-based-care/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:53:10 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-state-and-science-of-value-based-care/ What you should know: – Providers believe 96% of payments are now value-based to some degree, and 58% believe their EHR provider will not be able to support the data strategies needed to thrive in care based on value, according to a new study conducted by Morning Consult and Innovaccer. – The 37-page national research […]]]>

What you should know:

– Providers believe 96% of payments are now value-based to some degree, and 58% believe their EHR provider will not be able to support the data strategies needed to thrive in care based on value, according to a new study conducted by Morning Consult and Innovaccer.

– The 37-page national research study reveals the top IT infrastructure issues that healthcare leaders say are hindering or critical to making progress toward accelerating their transformation to value-based care.

The State and Science of Value-Based Care

Only 4% of providers today report using pure FFS unrelated to quality and value, and that figure drops to 1% by 2025. Providers believe that the payment model historically dominated in healthcare died out and that 96% of healthcare payment today has links to quality of care, cost reduction and, in some cases, the patient experience. This increases to 99% by 2025.

Additionally, while providers say they have shifted 96% of their revenue to some form of performance risk, 80% of these programs operate on an FFS architecture, where claims submission (as opposed to population-based payment) remains the value engine – analysis and payment based. The FFS architecture is even present in shared savings models, according to respondents, where healthcare costs are compared to a goal, and providers and payers share savings or losses.

– 58% said they did not believe their EHR vendor could support their enterprise data strategy.

– 42% said their data is highly fragmented and siled, a blind spot for the information, workflows, actions, and reports critical to value-based care delivery.

– 48% said they were not confident their organization had the infrastructure to capture and use all patient data.

– 41% said their organization needs population health analytics to advance their enterprise data/information strategy, making it the #1 sought-after capability among the top ten priorities.

– 68% said their organization lacks the AI ​​capabilities to drive the digital transformation essential to value-based care.

– 69% of healthcare officials said they do not use technology to identify at-risk patients.

– Despite a 94% increase in the number of executives who expect consumer-generated data to have a high impact on SDoH by 2025, 72% of respondents do not integrate medical determinants data and social.

In addition to presenting key findings on provider perspectives on value-based care, the State and Science of Value-Based Care report covers value-based care challenges and opportunities reported by respondents; addresses people, process and technology gaps that respondents said they need to fill; and provides expert insight and guidance to help suppliers leverage their data to accelerate their transition to value.

“Research shows a strong relationship between an organization’s investment in modern digital infrastructure and its ability to succeed with value-based payment models,” Stevens said. “Digital investments will be the deciding factor for more mature organizations that bear the risk. Key to value-based care is the ability to integrate data from EHRs and other IT silos (clinical, claims, lab, pharmacy, telehealth, remote monitoring, social determinants, consumer-generated, etc.) in a unified patient record that enables providers to drive analytics-based workflows, care management, risk stratification, and patient engagement strategies to achieve better outcomes at lower cost.

For more information, download the State and Science of Value-Based Care

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How Afro-Colombian Champeta started as a musical genre and evolved into art and film https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/how-afro-colombian-champeta-started-as-a-musical-genre-and-evolved-into-art-and-film/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 00:43:02 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/how-afro-colombian-champeta-started-as-a-musical-genre-and-evolved-into-art-and-film/ In this Latinx Heritage Month, mitú shines a light on the root of Latinx joy. We dig deep into the subcultures and traditions that have shaped our communities – the reason for our song and dance. We continue to build thriving communities together through our strong roots and with the support of State Farm. ¡Tremen! […]]]>

In this Latinx Heritage Month, mitú shines a light on the root of Latinx joy. We dig deep into the subcultures and traditions that have shaped our communities – the reason for our song and dance. We continue to build thriving communities together through our strong roots and with the support of State Farm.

¡Tremen!

If your mind immediately said, ‘Bórralo, bórralo/Yarly, Yarly, Yarly;’ then, it is likely that you have heard a champeta. Specifically TikTok viral El Avioncito by GiBlack, a song that recently hit social media again via a Tweet from the Federación Colombiana de Fútbol. As one of many examples in recent memory, this trend shows that Afro-Colombian champeta continues to evolve beyond music into other forms of media.

Hailing from the Caribbean coast of Colombia, champeta is a musical genre that has proven to be truly revolutionary. According to New York educator Bryan Prado Ceron, who spoke to mitú, “La champeta is about mixing a rhythm with strong African influences such as socca, reggae, etc. The DJ scratches the records and adds random sound samples throughout the mixes that were readily available within their boards. Along with the DJ, the MC was educating the crowd. Educate them on social issues, teach them new dance moves or just how to dance on the song that was already playing.

Having become popular in the 80s, the champeta will find its place in the Colombian barrios. As a port city, Cartagena facilitated the cultural exchange that led to the creation of champeta. Given its location, it has gradually become the main selection of entertainment for people affected by social stratification. In turn, those in power would disapprove of it while those in favor of it would turn it into a shared act of resistance and positive change. Despite overwhelming rejection, champeta would continue to thrive on the fringes of pop culture throughout the 90s and break into mainstream culture in the 21st century.

One of the earliest films centered on the champeta was filmmaker Luis Silva’s 1990s short, “Los reyes criollos de la champeta”. This documentary aimed to raise awareness of the many MCs and DJs who had kept the movement alive at that time and remained a seminal work on the champeta. To this day, Silva’s piece remains a classic and is acclaimed by avid followers around the world. Years later, “Champeta Paradise” would mark another example of the burgeoning cinematic representation of this genre.

It’s been more than two decades since “Los reyes criollos de la champeta” and “Champeta Paradise” kept the champeta movement going in the 90s and 2000s, and it’s only going from strength to strength. The 2020s saw the champeta danced on the Super Bowl stage by international icon Shakira, as well as on TikTok by thousands around the world.

With the Disney+ streaming service soon to release worldwide the youth comedy-drama “Champeta, el ritmo de la Tierra” – a series that will do very well for Afro-Colombian representation on a major platform. – Cinema, music and TV fans will have no choice but to appreciate the cultural phenomena Champeta has been and continues to be.

Click HERE for more information on State Farm’s commitment to strengthening our communities with 24/7 support for individuals and families.

Do you notice any necessary corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

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Oz supporters’ attack ad on Fetterman is meant to suppress black votes https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/oz-supporters-attack-ad-on-fetterman-is-meant-to-suppress-black-votes/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 00:42:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/oz-supporters-attack-ad-on-fetterman-is-meant-to-suppress-black-votes/ Supporters of Mehmet Oz – the Republican Senate candidate backed by Donald Trump in Pennsylvania – are going after Oz’s Democratic opponent, John Fetterman, with a new round of attack ads. The new spots, part of a $500,000 ad campaign by pro-Oz group American Leadership Action, slam Fetterman for a 2013 incident in which he […]]]>

Supporters of Mehmet Oz – the Republican Senate candidate backed by Donald Trump in Pennsylvania – are going after Oz’s Democratic opponent, John Fetterman, with a new round of attack ads. The new spots, part of a $500,000 ad campaign by pro-Oz group American Leadership Action, slam Fetterman for a 2013 incident in which he pulled a gun on a black jogger and detained him afterwards. mistakenly believing he had committed a crime.

Unsurprisingly, the 30-second version of the commercial began airing on television networks with solid black audiences, such as Black Entertainment Television (BET), ESPN and Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN). There’s also a 15-second version aimed at reaching people on their social media feeds and smartphones. It’s a desperate move in a race that could be crucial to keeping Democrats in check in the Senate.

Fetterman admitted his mistake but didn’t apologize as fully as some in the black community think.

This latest GOP strategy and the incident behind it highlights two things. The first is how deep Republicans will go to suppress black voters they don’t want to win. Second, the campaign underscores the fact that white people, Democratic politicians and would-be black community allies must own up to their mistakes and do better — and be better — after they transgress.

In January 2013, when Fetterman was mayor of the Pittsburgh-area steel town of Braddock, he reportedly heard gunshots near his home and claimed to have seen a man dressed in black and wearing a face mask running down the street. street. The mayor at the time claimed the man was running to an elementary school – this was weeks after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut.

Fetterman said he chased the man in his van and held him with his 20-gauge shotgun until police arrived. This man, who was an unarmed jogger named Christopher Miyares, provided a very different account of the incident. He said Fetterman pointed the gun at his chest and he definitely knew he was black, which Fetterman denied.

Nonetheless, Miyares, now incarcerated for an unrelated offence, backs Fetterman in the Senate race. “Even with everything I’ve said, it’s inhumane to believe that a single mistake should define a man’s life,” Miyares said in a letter to the Philadelphia Inquirer last year. “I hope he becomes a senator.”

Fetterman admitted his mistake but didn’t apologize as fully as some in the black community think. For example, he could have used the incident to highlight pervasive racial attitudes, perceptions, and stereotypes in society that endanger the lives of black people. Even white progressives, like Fetterman, who fight for criminal justice reform, voting rights, and the legalization of cannabis, are not immune to so-called implicit biases and unconscious cues that associate blackness to crime and violence. And not talking anymore may be the reason why he lost some black votes in Philadelphiawhere blacks make up more than 40% of the population, in the May primary.

As a Philadelphia voter who has worked on issues affecting black people – I was the director of the Pennsylvania Legislative Black Caucus in the state legislature over a decade ago – I remember the quote of James Carville: “Pennsylvania is Philadelphia and Pittsburgh with Alabama in between.” This quote resonates with me, although it doesn’t tell the whole story.

Philadelphia is two cities in one. Although it has suffered from a long legacy of racial segregation and current social stratification based on race, education, and geography, Philadelphia is an economically booming and gentrifying city. It has also been the poorest major US city in recent years, with about a quarter of its residents – disproportionately black and other people of color – living in poverty. Despite world-class hospitals in Philadelphia, residents of color suffer health disparities due to lack of access. And even with its many quality universities, only 28% of its residents aged 25 and over have earned a bachelor’s degree; Philadelphia is one of the worst cities for college achievement.

When voters see ads such as those referring to the 2013 Fetterman incident, we have to wonder what the GOP is offering or has offered its black voters.

Nothing the Republican Party has shown indicates that it is willing to deal with these crises in any meaningful way. So when voters see ads like the ones about the 2013 Fetterman incident, we have to wonder what the GOP is offering or has offered its black voters. To be very clear, it’s fair to criticize Fetterman for what he did, but we shouldn’t be fooled into thinking the GOP really cares about what the former mayor did to an unarmed black man or that the party is dedicated to getting black voters on its side.

After all, Pennsylvania has proven to be a national leader in hate and attempted insurrection. Nearly 70 people from Pennsylvania have been charged with involvement in the January 6, 2021 attack on the US Capitol. And last year, Keystone State ranked first in the nation for spreading white supremacist propaganda such as flyers, posters and graffiti, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

Not to mention, we’ve seen how Trump foot soldiers, such as state GOP gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano — who was recently seen posing in a 2013-2014 professor photo wearing a Confederate uniform — attempted to cancel the 2020 election. Mastriano plans to push for every Pennsylvania resident to re-register to vote, a move that has been criticized as a way to disenfranchise black voters in the future.

The tactic bears a strong resemblance to the GOP and Russian social media disinformation campaign of 2016.

And take the burning question of whether or not a woman has the fundamental right to make choices about her body. Republicans in the state legislature have signaled they want to push for anti-abortion laws, and Oz and Mastriano want to make abortion illegal in Pennsylvania. It’s a move that would exacerbate health inequities for women and lead to more black women dying from pregnancy-related complications. From 2013 to 2018, data shows that black women accounted for 43% of births in Philadelphia but 73% of maternal deaths.

Indeed, Oz and his Republican supporters don’t care about black voters unless there are efforts to keep them away from the polls come November.

The tactic bears a strong resemblance to the GOP and Russian social media disinformation campaign of 2016. The effort fueled black resentment toward Hillary Clinton in the presidential election over her 1996 comments calling young black people “super predators.” “. However valid the anger over his use of the word and the evil he perpetuated, the campaign was not used to empower black people but to dissuade them from voting.

In 2016, when Bill Clinton didn’t apologize for his wife’s comments or his 1996 crime bill that favored the mass incarceration of black people, Fetterman tweeted“True progressive leadership requires the honesty and humility to admit when you’ve made mistakes and work to fix them.” He went on to say, “It’s a hard truth that America’s ‘first black president’ actually enacted very destructive policies for African Americans.”

Like Democrats as a whole, Fetterman should heed his own words. Democrats need to build trust and show results rather than doing performative politics with empty promises, like congressional Democrats dressed in kente stoles during the George Floyd protests. After the dust settled, Democrats failed to implement the criminal justice reforms demanded by their base.

But that doesn’t negate the fact that Oz is a Trump-backed candidate who would be a black nightmare and that a Republican-controlled Senate would be a disaster. If black people do not show up to vote in the general election, we could face this reality. It is possible to call out Fetterman and demand that he do the right thing for black voters, but also recognize that he is the best candidate and vote for him out of self-interest.

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Seattle teachers are the latest big-city union to strike amid nationwide shortages https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/seattle-teachers-are-the-latest-big-city-union-to-strike-amid-nationwide-shortages/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 18:07:41 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/seattle-teachers-are-the-latest-big-city-union-to-strike-amid-nationwide-shortages/ Published 2022-09-09 12:48 12:48 September 9, 2022 pm On Thursday, Tymmony Keegan stood on a picket line outside Cleveland STEM High School in Seattle, where public school teachers had gone on strike the day before over what would have been the start of the school year. His colleagues held signs reading, “Listen to educators! Fund […]]]>

On Thursday, Tymmony Keegan stood on a picket line outside Cleveland STEM High School in Seattle, where public school teachers had gone on strike the day before over what would have been the start of the school year.

His colleagues held signs reading, “Listen to educators! Fund our children’s dreams! A nurse in every school! It was her twins’ 4th birthday, a milestone they celebrated by temporarily joining the picket line. Cars and trucks honked their support for educators as they passed the closed school.

“All of us here on the picket line believe in what we’re doing, and we believe schools have the ability to be a much better place for students and staff,” said Keegan, an eight-year veteran. who teaches Black Studies in Cleveland.

The 6,000 teachers, paraprofessionals, clerical professionals, substitutes and other staff who make up the Seattle Education Association are part of a wave of teacher strikes that have taken place in districts large and small across the country this year, rekindling a movement of union activism in education that took place before the pandemic. Only now is a national teacher shortage giving workers in this female-dominated profession even more leverage to demand better wages, benefits and working conditions.

“One of the factors that determines the power of the union in bargaining negotiations is the demand for teachers,” said Bradley D. Marianno, assistant professor of educational policy and leadership and director of the Center for Research, Evaluation, and Evaluation at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. “So if districts are having trouble attracting and retaining teachers, it allows the union that represents educators to push stronger demands in their bargaining rounds.”

The National Education Association estimates that the nation is short of 300,000 teachers. Across the country, teacher morale has plummeted amid the COVID-19 pandemic and a political climate that has led to attacks on public education, but lingering concerns over salaries and class sizes have also heightened tensions, experts and educators say.

In Seattle, educators are asking their school district for a two-year annual salary increase above the state-funded 5.5% cost-of-living adjustment. Their demands also include class size caps and workload relief for school nurses as well as better support for social-emotional learning, special education and multilingual education. Seattle Public Schools serve more than 50,000 students.

And they are not the only teachers in Washington to come out during the crisis. Teachers in the Ridgefield School District near Portland went on strike Friday. Teachers in the Kent School District, 20 miles from Seattle, ended their strike on Wednesday after walking off the job in late August. Seattle, however, stands out as the second major city union to announce a strike in recent weeks, with Columbus, Ohio, educators in August briefly going on strike for the first time in nearly 50 years. In the spring, teachers in large districts like Minneapolis and Sacramento also went on strike.

The work stoppages come as surveys of educators have found they are suffering from acute stress and burnout, making them more likely to consider leaving the profession. Before the pandemic, teachers were demanding more from districts, walking out of schools across the country during the strike movement known as #RedForEd that took place during the 2018-19 school year.

In 2022, teachers are on strike as politicians drive a wedge over the curriculum while leaving students and schools without basic resources, National Education Association president Becky Pringle said in a statement to the 19th. Every student, she said, deserves an excellent public school with high-quality educators who have the time, resources and support to inspire their students.

“I am infinitely proud that our educators act on behalf of each student to ensure they have the resources they need to succeed and a school that attracts and retains the highest quality educators with professional compensation. “, said Pringle. “The #RedForEd movement, followed by the COVID-19 pandemic and now a crisis-level national teacher shortage, has made it clear that ‘back to normal’ is not enough.”

Seattle teachers last went on strike in 2015 with demands over their salaries, ratings and working hours, among other things. Seven years later, their salaries remain a sticking point. Paraprofessionals earn a starting salary of around $19 per hour, while teachers earn a starting salary of around $63,000. For Keegan, a single parent who completed his second year of school at Seattle Public Schools in the spring, it can be difficult to balance his salary and the bills related to child care and student loans. She resides in a house in Renton, Washington, which their late mother purchased before she died of Parkinson’s disease.

Supporters of striking Seattle teachers take part in a march through downtown Seattle.
Supporters of striking Seattle teachers take part in a September 2015 march in downtown Seattle.
(Phuong Le/AP)

“If it wasn’t for this, I don’t know how I would pay the rent considering what it costs,” they said. “So it’s been a huge financial burden taken away from me, thanks to my mum, but I have a roommate. It’s also something that helps me financially, and I’m grateful to have elders in my life that help me take care of my children.

Laurie Johnson, the registrar of Franklin High School in Seattle’s Mount Baker neighborhood, said she couldn’t afford to live in the community where she works. “Everyone wants the chance to own their home,” she said. “Everyone should live on a living wage. And that’s all we want. I’m not asking to get rich. I’m in the wrong business if I want to get rich.

In a statement posted on its website Thursday, Seattle Public Schools said it was continuing to negotiate with the Seattle Education Association, although it had not yet reached an agreement with the union.

“We continue to negotiate in good faith and are doing everything we can to get students back into classrooms,” the statement said. “We understand the challenges students and families face when schools are closed.”

The district did not respond to the 19th’s request for comment before publication.

Marianno said the real pay of educators has stagnated. Their salaries do not reflect the current level of inflation. A new study from the Economic Policy Institute has found that teacher salaries have remained stable since 1996 and both women and men are paying a salary penalty for choosing education as a profession. Overall, teachers earn 23.5% less than comparable college graduates, according to the study.

Economist Stephanie Seguino argues that one of the reasons educators’ salaries are lower than others who require the level of teaching expertise is that women make up the majority of people in the field. Nearly 80% of the 3 million members of the National Education Association are women.

“The fact that it’s women is what’s holding back wages,” Seguino told 19 in the spring. “And it has to do with, really, what we live in is a gender caste system. Among economists, I would call this stratification, where there is a gender hierarchy, just as there is a racial hierarchy.

Teaching requires more than just pedagogical skills, but also huge social-emotional skills, Seguino said. “In any other profession, we would reward people for their special skills,” she added. “But for women, we assume it’s natural, so it doesn’t need to be rewarded. The great tragedy is that this work is of fundamental importance for the whole economy. The education of children is one of the most important investments we make in any country. So what we’re basically doing is not reimbursing the people who are essential to the productivity of a country like the United States.

Pay is just one reason Seattle educators are on strike. Johnson said she’s also worried the district isn’t allocating the necessary resources to its special education and multilingual programs. She said her husband, who was diagnosed with dyslexia, was a special education student but received the academic help needed to graduate from Franklin High and continue his college education.

“He beat the odds because of the funding and the people who supported him,” Johnson said.

Keegan wants the district to ensure schools have good student-to-staff ratios so young people get the education they deserve. By giving educators appropriate workloads and workloads, the district can help educators better serve students, she said. “Controlling our work allows us to provide these supports in a meaningful way for students,” they added.

As Seattle public schools work to end the teachers’ strike, Marianno expects more large urban school districts to come out in the near future. Los Angeles Unified School District teachers are negotiating new contracts and have already encountered difficulties in the negotiation process, he said. Los Angeles teachers last went on strike in January 2019.

Keegan said the walkouts teachers across the country are engaging in come from districts asking too much of them for little in return.

Schools “can’t keep asking us to do more and more and expect people to want to stay in the teaching profession,” she said. “We have seen people leaving in droves in recent years in particular. In my eight years of teaching as a classroom teacher, I thought to myself, “I’m really not sure this is something I can handle year after year. But I believe in what we do.

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Financial Administrator of the Generocity Foundation – Generocity https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/financial-administrator-of-the-generocity-foundation-generocity/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 00:12:43 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/financial-administrator-of-the-generocity-foundation-generocity/ Position: Foundation Financial Administrator (part-time) Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; hybrid (downtown location, both onsite and remote) Job Description/Overview: We are looking for a part-time Financial Administrator (FA), working an average of 25 hours/week, reporting to the President, to complement our team of four. The AF will be responsible for Foundation budgeting, vendor relations, vendor contracts and […]]]>

Position: Foundation Financial Administrator (part-time)

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; hybrid (downtown location, both onsite and remote)

Job Description/Overview:

We are looking for a part-time Financial Administrator (FA), working an average of 25 hours/week, reporting to the President, to complement our team of four. The AF will be responsible for Foundation budgeting, vendor relations, vendor contracts and grant transactions, coordination of audits, financial reviews of proposals and special research projects.

The ideal candidate will have direct experience working in a financial role for a non-profit organization or private foundation, excellent computer skills, strong attention to detail (we can’t stress this enough!) and a ability to communicate clearly, in writing. and in person, with people with varying levels of financial understanding. Equally important is a demonstrated commitment to racial equity/justice, the ability to contribute to a collaborative, inclusive and learning-oriented environment within a small team, offering creative thinking skills and a caring heart . A feeling of joy is a must because, hey, social justice is hard work!

Main responsibilities:

  • Accounting, including managing vendor relationships and coordinating grant payments.
  • Manage payroll, benefits and pension transactions.
  • Maintain/track Foundation insurance policies, affinity group memberships and vendor contracts.
  • Lead the annual budgeting/expenditure guidelines planning process.
  • Work with the Investment Advisor on cash flow for grants and operations.
  • Prepare quarterly briefing notes to accompany Treasurer’s reports and perform financial analysis as required.
  • Provide administrative support and coordination to the audit team, including the audit firm, staff, the external accountant and the audit committee of the board of directors.
  • Coordinate the filing of 5500, 990-PF, and 990-T returns with federal and state entities as well as estimated quarterly excise taxes.
  • Review financial audits and/or 990 statements submitted by organizations with grant proposals.
  • Incorporate occasional special projects as needed.

Qualifications:

Education
BA or BS preferred, ideally in accounting, finance, business administration or related field or related certifications. Knowledge of GAAP for not-for-profit organizations. Any combination of education and experience that would provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities will be considered.

Live
3-5 years of related accounting/finance and operations experience, preferably in a private foundation/public charity/non-profit institution(s).

Strong technology skills, including but not limited to mid-level Microsoft Office suite (especially Excel); Adobe; QuickBooks; online payment systems; DocuSign; and database experience. Experience with grant management software (ideally Blackbaud Grantmaking) is preferred but not required. Ease of learning and integrating other job requirements with all software changes and updates.

Salary/Benefits:

The salary range is $50,000 to $55,000 (for an average of 25 hours/week) depending on qualifications, experience and strong references. The benefits package includes a 10% employer contribution to a 403(b) retirement plan, regardless of employee match, immediate vesting, long-term disability and life insurance paid at 100 %, a $5,000 contribution to a health care plan and additional funds for professional development. The vacation includes two weeks of personal leave as well as standard federal holidays. We also close the office the week of July 4e and the week between Christmas Eve and New Year’s Day to rest and recharge.

About Us

The Samuel S. Fels Fund (Fels Fund) is a private foundation whose mission is to advance social, racial, and economic justice in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The organization actively supports efforts to resist systems of oppression that affect us all, including but not limited to white supremacy, anti-immigrant bias, and economic stratification. We envision a day when all Philadelphians can live full, meaningful and dignified lives as valued members and contributors to our diverse and vibrant city. We are committed to exploring equitable ways to share power and resources with communities that are and have been historically excluded. The Fels Fund seeks to promote diversity, equity and inclusion through its grantmaking priorities, relationships with grantee partners, investment principles and portfolio management, relationships with suppliers and capacity building efforts for its staff, board and beneficiaries. The Statement of Values ​​of the Fels Fund can be found here.

Apply for this position

Send your resume (pdf format preferred) to info@samfels.org with the words “Financial Administrator” in the subject line. No phone calls, please. We strongly encourage Black, Indigenous and/or people of color, women, trans/non-binary people, LGBQ, seniors, formerly incarcerated, and people with disabilities to apply. Deadline: We are committed to responding to everyone who applies, and this may stretch our capacity, so we ask that you be patient with our response time. Priority will be given to applications received before October 17, 2022.

Apply now
Mention that you found this job on Generocity!

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Using advanced analytics to manage patient risk and deliver value-based care https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/using-advanced-analytics-to-manage-patient-risk-and-deliver-value-based-care/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/using-advanced-analytics-to-manage-patient-risk-and-deliver-value-based-care/ To improve health outcomes and reduce costs, the US healthcare system must move away from fee-for-service models and provide value-based, proactive comprehensive care (VBC). High-quality data and advanced analytics that produce actionable insights into patients’ medical and social needs are a critical part of this transition. Focus on patient outcomes In a values-based system, patient […]]]>

To improve health outcomes and reduce costs, the US healthcare system must move away from fee-for-service models and provide value-based, proactive comprehensive care (VBC). High-quality data and advanced analytics that produce actionable insights into patients’ medical and social needs are a critical part of this transition.

Focus on patient outcomes

In a values-based system, patient outcomes, patient experience and quality of care become the drivers of clinical care delivery. Costly, low-impact services such as emergency room visits for conditions treatable by primary care physicians can be avoided by improving access to primary care – annual wellness visits, screening and preventative medical procedures – and chronic care management. VBC contracts actively support the transition from unnecessary reliance on emergency services to appropriate use through incentives for preventive care and the achievement of quality goals.

Health systems fully evolving in the area of ​​GBV benefit from predictions about future patient health needs and information about early interventions that can maintain health over time. Using artificial intelligence, providers can predict patient outcomes and risk by integrating data in various areas, including demographics, social determinants of health, utilization, claims, and patient information. consumers to identify necessary interventions such as:

  • Personalized education and communication with patients
  • Improving access to preventive services
  • Chronic Disease Management
  • Automated pre-visit planning
  • Integration of ancillary services such as nutrition counseling and behavioral health
  • Referral to social services

Management of patients at risk

By using advanced analytics to drive population health management and risk stratification, healthcare systems can meet the challenges of disease burden and tight cost controls. Health systems should also leverage analytics to ensure appropriate reimbursement for the extra work required to deliver BCV.

For example, analytical tools are needed to calculate risk scores such as the hierarchical condition category score and the risk adjustment factor. Proper coding literally pays off for healthcare systems. With an understanding and documentation of patients’ total disease burden, providers not only expand their capabilities to improve health outcomes, but they also increase revenue per member per month for patients, ensuring that they receive a refund in accordance with the necessary procedures.

Addressing social drivers of health outcomes

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the health industry has become more aware of the critical link between social determinants and overall health and well-being. As cases rose at first, primary care and specialist visits declined and cancer screenings were reduced. Providers quickly recognized that disadvantaged subpopulations and people with chronic conditions needed rapid diagnosis and patient-centered treatment plans to optimize care, improve performance on quality and utilization measures and maximize reimbursement.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is considering new measures to ensure data capture on food insecurity, housing instability, transportation, and interpersonal safety to help health plans be more proactive and offer more results-based reimbursements. Advanced analytics can ingest this information and improve health plans’ readiness to take on financial BCV risk, reduce costs, manage health inequities, and improve quality of care. They represent an opportunity for healthcare organizations to respond to the imperative realized through COVID – to create more accessible, affordable and equitable healthcare that ties payment more closely to value.

About the Author

Michael Dulin, MD, PhD, Chief Medical Officer, Gray Matter Analytics. Dr. Dulin is a nationally recognized leader in the field of health information technology and the application of analytics and outcomes research to improve the delivery of care and make improve the health of the population. He is currently a professor at UNC Charlotte in the Department of Public Health Sciences where he directs the Academy for Population Health Innovation. As Medical Director of Gray Matter Analytics, Dr. Dulin drives the company’s growth and success by directing clinical activities across the organization. He leads the overall clinical strategy and design of the CoreTechs® Healthcare Analytics platform and Gray Matters analytics solutions and teaches clients how to leverage healthcare data analytics to advance their clinical outcomes, operational and financial. He began his career as an electrical and biomedical engineer and earned his doctorate in neurophysiology before becoming a primary care physician.

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