Social stratification – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 12:14:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png Social stratification – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Teaching English in India: How to Decolonize the Global Lingua Franca https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/teaching-english-in-india-how-to-decolonize-the-global-lingua-franca/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 11:55:21 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/teaching-english-in-india-how-to-decolonize-the-global-lingua-franca/ “Indian English” retains our uniqueness as a multicultural community and serves as a window to realize the impossible dreams that globalization has made possible. English, and to be precise, British English is the language of our colonizers, a colonial heritage and a lingering symbol of neo-colonialism. But as we have, in the 70 years following […]]]>

“Indian English” retains our uniqueness as a multicultural community and serves as a window to realize the impossible dreams that globalization has made possible.

English, and to be precise, British English is the language of our colonizers, a colonial heritage and a lingering symbol of neo-colonialism. But as we have, in the 70 years following Independence, carried the project to decolonize, we have also sought to globalize.

Following India’s economic liberalization in 1991, upward economic mobility was made possible by the gradual progression towards a rapidly growing free market economy. The widespread use of English as the language of instruction and assessment in educational institutions has been one of the most important catalysts for upward socio-economic mobility.

However, today we stand at an important turning point in the history of English teaching in India, as alongside decolonization, de-globalization is also sought after.

As cited by Nancy Hornberger and Viniti Vaish (2009) in the article Multilingual language policy and school language practice: globalization and teaching of English in India, Singapore and South Africa,Phillipson (1992), the sociolinguist, extends Ritzer’s term ‘McDonaldization’ or globalization to the spread of global English. He sees this as linguistic imperialism that culturally impoverishes the Third World by eroding its linguistic ecology.

However, we have to make an important distinction between decolonization and de-globalization, between being Eurocentric and pluralist-centric. It is easy to diminish the nuances and fail to discern the fact that the pursuit of the enrichment of our Indianness must not suppress the very value of inclusive pluralism which is the basis of our cultural richness.

A fundamental part of our pluralism is the cultural practice of linguistic diversity which has influenced educational policy makers to integrate the vernacular and the regional into the mainstream and the national. We must refrain from the collective amnesia which makes us ignore that the internal diversity within a language and the adaptation of the language to the needs of real-world situations are essential to the survival of a language.

The goal of the use of language is communicative intelligibility. As long as the goal of communicative intelligibility is maintained, the enterprise of decolonization must beware of adopting a simplistic approach and abandoning the global lingua franca as an integral component of education.

Instead, it is imperative to recognize the variety of ‘English’ that have developed in various geographic regions of the world and how different nations have co-opted English, the global lingua franca, to maximize the opportunities offered by the vernacularization of the world. english.

The conceptualization of the “English” can be traced back to the foundational work of Braj Kachru (1986, 1990, 1996, 2005, 2008) who questioned the marginalized status of the “English of the world”. As cited in the article by Todd Ruecker (2011) Challenge the hierarchy of native and non-native English speakers in ELT: new directions in race theory,the journal Kachru founded, English of the world, has always argued for the importance of the English in the world.

For example, the first piece by Sridhar and Sridhar (1986) questioned the use of native speaker models and the assumptions that English learners are always immersed in environments where English is the dominant language. More recently, Kachru (2005) has referred to beliefs surrounding the superiority of native speakers as “myths” that can be compared to “loaded guns” (p. 16-18).

An innovative approach that has been developed over the years in the teaching of English is the “English as a lingua franca” or “English as an international language” model for teaching in countries. postcolonial and multicultural.

Andy Kirkpatrick and Roland Sussex write in the book’s introduction English as an international language in Asia: implications for language teaching, “In the multilingual contexts of Asia, the blending of codes between English and local languages ​​becomes a natural and creative strategy and identity marker for multilingual users of English. These multilingual users of English also regularly use English as a lingua franca (ELF) when communicating with other multilinguals in the region.

On the contrary, as Kingsley Bolton points out, “since the 1980s a pluricentric and pluralist approach to English or the English languages ​​of the world has become so well established that it now constitutes a kind of orthodoxy in contemporary language studies. English and sociolinguistics. So much so, perhaps, that various linguists have begun to question or at least problematize various aspects of the English global approach to English language studies and applied linguistics.

Despite this argument, I believe that the inclusive idea of ​​various “English” should be kept in mind before formulating a policy on language teaching in India.

To enrich our Indianness, we do not need to devalue the English language. Instead, we need to recognize that a particular language does not imply a monolithic identity. A language can be co-opted by various social identities to minimize stratification and “Indian English” has done exactly that magic. We do not need to imitate and imitate British English or American English and must continually develop languages ​​as an enabling and unifying tool to broaden our perspectives and horizons.

“Indian English” retains our uniqueness as a multicultural community and serves as a window to realize the impossible dreams that globalization has made possible.

The writer is the author of two books “Indian Feminine Fury” and “Unapologetically Mad”. She is a postgraduate student in TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) at the University of St Andrews, Scotland, and studied English Literature at the University of Delhi.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not represent the position of this publication.

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Signify Health’s Home Care Transition Coordination Solution Launched in Over 50 Hospitals Across Country | Business https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/signify-healths-home-care-transition-coordination-solution-launched-in-over-50-hospitals-across-country-business/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 20:35:43 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/signify-healths-home-care-transition-coordination-solution-launched-in-over-50-hospitals-across-country-business/ DALLAS AND NEW YORK – (BUSINESS WIRE) – July 20, 2021– Signify Health, Inc. (NYSE: SGFY), a leading value-driven healthcare platform that leverages advanced analytics, technology and nationwide healthcare provider networks , has activated its Transition to Home solution in more than 50 hospitals to provide Medicare patients with the clinical and social services they […]]]>

DALLAS AND NEW YORK – (BUSINESS WIRE) – July 20, 2021–

Signify Health, Inc. (NYSE: SGFY), a leading value-driven healthcare platform that leverages advanced analytics, technology and nationwide healthcare provider networks , has activated its Transition to Home solution in more than 50 hospitals to provide Medicare patients with the clinical and social services they need during the hospital-to-home transition. The solution, designed to reduce the clinical and financial impacts of preventable inpatient readmissions and unnecessary emergency department visits, is used by some of the industry’s most visionary healthcare systems and providers, including Ardent Health Services, Beaumont Health, Cape Fear Valley Health, and Premier Santé.

Signify Health’s Transition to Home solution is designed to complement existing post-discharge care coordination strategies in hospitals, healthcare systems, clinically integrated networks (CINs) and responsible care organizations (ACOs). Through virtual and telephone coordination of clinical and social care, Signify Health uses a holistic, evidence-based clinical model that supports Medicare patients for 90 days after discharge from an acute care facility. Through this customizable and scalable model, Signify Health works with patients and their care teams to improve quality of care and outcomes, and to ensure a high-quality patient experience that extends beyond the four walls of the hospital. ‘establishment.

“As large healthcare systems and physician groups take on more risk, they seek to better address clinical and social gaps that exist outside of acute care, but which can have a significant impact on health outcomes. of their patients, ”said Kyle Armbrester. , CEO of Signify Health. “We are excited to activate our extensive patient engagement capabilities at home and around our supplier partners participating in episodes and other value-based programs. Facilitating a rapid transition to home and extending the reach of our partners beyond the hospital setting will improve the patient care experience, achieve better outcomes and improve financial performance. “

Potentially preventable hospital readmissions cost Medicare an estimated $ 17 billion a year, and hundreds of thousands of patients are affected. Barriers to post-discharge recovery are responsible for many of these readmissions and encompass a wide range of issues such as the social determinants of health gaps, multiple co-morbidities, medication mismanagement and poor adherence to the treatment plan. care.

Analysis of readmission results for 800,000 episodes of care managed by Signify Health under Medicare’s Value-Based Pooled Payment Program (BPCI-A) shows that nearly 44% of all readmissions occur over 30 days after discharge from hospital. To address the risk of readmission during this critical phase, Signify Health’s Transition to Home solution provides patients with evidence-based clinical and social care coordination services for 90 days after discharge. Services offered include risk stratification, patient education, social needs and behavioral health assessment, medication review, care plan reminders, facilitation of PCP and specialist follow-up, coordination with acute care clinicians and escalating and triage care pathways.

These services are provided by Signify Health’s interdisciplinary care team made up of clinical and social care coordinators, pharmacists, nurses and physicians, who maintain a regular cadence of contact with patients and providers to identify and respond. to individual needs and act as an extension of the patient’s care team. . The Signify Health care team uses proprietary technology and tools to coordinate care with the patient’s PCP, apply evidence-based care coordination interventions, and facilitate networked use.

By applying motivational interviewing techniques that allow for deeper conversations, Signify healthcare coordinators typically identify between two and four social needs (such as food insecurity and lack of access to transportation) per patient and are able to meet more than 50% of these needs.

“Signify Health’s evidence-based approach to our Transition to Home solution focuses on the key drivers of unnecessary readmissions,” said Marc Rothman, MD, medical director of Signify Health. “Our clinical and social care professionals are trained to meet the needs of patients regardless of their level of risk, ensuring that provider care teams can focus on the most urgent cases. Ultimately, this offering was designed to address the most important measure of success: healthier, happier patients, and empowered clinicians. “

Since the program’s pilot launch in 2021, Signify Health’s Transition to Home solution has grown rapidly and now supports patients in 10 states. Early results indicate a strong consumer interest in telephone support for post-discharge care coordination, with over 60% of affected patients engaging with the Signify Health care team and initial analyzes showing this engagement has a statistically significant effect on reducing readmission rates.

To learn more about Signify Health’s Transition to Home solution, please visit our website at https://www.signifyhealth.com/solutions-episodes-of-care-transition-to-home or contact us at info @ signifyhealth.com.

About Signify Health

Signify Health is a leading healthcare platform that leverages advanced analytics, technologies and nationwide healthcare provider networks to create and power payment programs based on value. Our mission is to transform the way care is paid and delivered so people can enjoy healthier, happier days at home. Our solutions support value-based payment programs by aligning financial incentives with results, providing tools to healthcare plans and healthcare organizations designed to assess and manage risk and identify actionable opportunities for improve patient outcomes, coordination and cost savings. Through our platform, we coordinate what we believe to be a holistic suite of clinical, social and behavioral services to meet an individual’s health needs and prevent adverse events that result in excessive costs, while moving services. to the home. For more information on how we’re bringing health home, visit us at signifyhealth.com.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/202107220005873/en/

For more information: Lynn Shepherd, lshepherd @ signifyhealth.com

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Online education: mobile apps improve your studies https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/online-education-mobile-apps-improve-your-studies/ Mon, 19 Jul 2021 13:10:26 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/online-education-mobile-apps-improve-your-studies/ Online education is the innovative answer to all the challenges of quality education. Discover the benefits of educational apps in creating a supportive learning environment for any student. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated many trends, and while few of them are positive, one certainly is – the rise of online learning. Even before the closures, […]]]>

Online education is the innovative answer to all the challenges of quality education. Discover the benefits of educational apps in creating a supportive learning environment for any student.

The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated many trends, and while few of them are positive, one certainly is – the rise of online learning. Even before the closures, the online learning industry was growing steadily and by 2019 it had reached a impressive $ 18.66 billion in investments.

The benefits of online learning abound. For example, according to the World Economic Forum, research suggests that online learning increases information retention rates. Online learning is also democratizing education, providing access to a growing pool of interested people. According to Darren Shimkus, President of Udemy, the biggest challenge most people face today is figuring out which skills will be relevant in the future.

Plenty of apps and features

Educational apps come in all shapes and varieties that you can imagine. There is not and cannot be a single, rigid classification of e-learning applications. However, there are three basic characteristics you can rate them on:

What can a student learn on this platform? Some apps and online resources offer knowledge on certain topics only, such as beekeeping lessons (Honeybeesonline, Perfectbee) or language lessons (Fluentu, Duolingo, Rosettastone). Others, like Coursera or Edx, offer several subjects to choose from. It should be noted that language learning resources are among the best represented and most in demand. They can choose to focus more on providing the best experience for learners of a particular language or to unite those who study different languages.

Not all apps aspire to be the next Duolingo; some are perfectly suited to a more specialized audience. That being said, the more well-known apps tend to get more attention, which gives them more authority. So if they offer some form of certification (as does, say, Coursera), it will be more likely to be of value to potential employers of the certificate holder. The highest authority rests with universities which have the power to award degrees to deserving learners if they choose a relevant program.

  • Characteristics and learning modes

You can learn alone or with friends, with or without an instructor. The program can offer the same content to everyone or adapt to each user. Some apps give you the choice of learning from visual aids, audio files, or videos that combine the two. It must be said that many online learning applications today are gamified, which means that the creators aspire to make the learning process a game.

Availability

Online education opens up a world of possibilities for those who were previously deprived of it. Billions of people, especially those living in poor rural areas, lack access to quality education. With e-learning, as long as a person has access to the Internet, they can begin their educational process.

Many educational mobile apps and institutions offer free learning options to disadvantaged and vulnerable groups. It improves social mobility and counteracts the problem of social stratification.

Additionally, educational apps are available 24/7, making it easier for people with unusual working hours or heavy workloads to study.

Remote access

Remote access to all study material is extremely beneficial for every student. Even when the learning process has a fixed schedule, sooner or later it will inevitably happen that someone misses their online course, whether it is due to illness or some other reason. Through online learning, they can watch class video, take tests, and review exercise materials online so they don’t fall behind.

Personalization and adaptability

Registering for an e-learning application results in the creation of a personalized account, where a learner can follow his progress. Through the personal account, students can access materials that concern them, which facilitates the management of their learning process. Adaptability is the continuation of personalization. Adaptive software can adapt to the needs and learning styles of students.

Diversido and many other e-learning mobile app developers have noticed an increase in demand for these features.

A simple example of adaptability can be found in word learning applications. If you are learning a new language and have a predetermined deck of cards with new words and their translations that you need to learn, an adaptive program will offer you cards that you have not answered correctly, until you learn. word.

Oddly enough, some tests also use such features. One example is GMAT, an exam required to be taken in most MBA programs around the world. To accurately determine a person’s level of skill and knowledge, on a scale of 200 to 800, the program constantly adapts to the exam candidate, offering a harder question after each correct answer and a longer question. easy, if the previous one has not been answered. correctly.

Almost no limits

There is virtually no limit to what you can learn online. Any knowledge can be obtained through the Internet. If we are talking about skills, only one that requires close physical interaction between humans, such as martial arts, or the acquisition of precise manual skills, such as those required for surgery, cannot be learned in a totally remote environment. .

For online education, a person’s geographic location is not a problem. Do you live in Cape Town and want to learn Urdu? While in-person lessons can be hard to find, online lessons do exist and will even allow you to communicate with native speakers.

Final thoughts

In summary, online learning has many advantages. For starters, it’s versatile and accessible to more people than regular learning. It can be accessed remotely from anywhere in the world, at any time, thus providing opportunities for people from disadvantaged backgrounds and representatives of vulnerable groups.

Online learning offers many possibilities for personalization, ranging from personalized accounts to fully adaptive programs designed to respond to the pace and learning styles of students for the best possible results.

Online education has almost no limits. When you are not limited by your physical location, you can find courses that better suit your learning needs. You have access to all the knowledge that the entire planet has to offer.

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Parties Promise Dalits Space, They Already Have It in Religion | Chandigarh News https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/parties-promise-dalits-space-they-already-have-it-in-religion-chandigarh-news/ Sun, 18 Jul 2021 23:19:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/parties-promise-dalits-space-they-already-have-it-in-religion-chandigarh-news/ AA Jalandhar: A few months before the State Assembly elections, all political parties are opening up a promising place for communities and castes. With the Jat Sikhs already assured of the domination of state politics, the BJP promises power to the Dalits, which SAD opposes to the Hindu and Dalit deputy ministers. Even with internal […]]]>

AA

Jalandhar: A few months before the State Assembly elections, all political parties are opening up a promising place for communities and castes. With the Jat Sikhs already assured of the domination of state politics, the BJP promises power to the Dalits, which SAD opposes to the Hindu and Dalit deputy ministers. Even with internal conflicts boiling over, Congress is also trying to strike a community balance. While the parties speak as if they invented social engineering in the Punjab, the fact remains that these safety valves already exist. For example, the heads of two larger and higher Sikh institutions come from the so-called lower castes. Giani Harpreet Singh, acting Jathedar of Akal Takht, the highest temporal seat of the Sikhs, is from the programmed caste (SC). Likewise, the chairman of the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak committee, Bibi Jagir Kaur, comes from a backward class (BC).
Although political discourse has created a perception that Dalits and Sikhs are two completely different entities, data analysis and observations show that not only SCs make up one-third of the total Sikh population in Punjab, but also many comrades from the so-called “lower castes” were working as granthis (scripture readers), ragis (hymn singers), preachers, and dhadis (ballad singers). Some of them have also reached the top, in terms of terms of office, as well as popularity and respect.
It took a lot of investigation to confirm Jathedar Ginai Harpreet Singh’s caste history as the usual response in SGPC circles and even those close to him in religious or community affairs was – no one ever discussed or stood up. worry.
Asked about his caste background, his background in Sikh religious affairs and his rise to the highest office, Giani Harpreet joked, “It never mattered to me or those around me. Throughout my sole identity I have been that of a Sikh and only my dedication to philosophy and the cause of Guru mattered. His father was also granthi.
“I passed the three-year course at the Guru Kashi Gurmat Institute, Talwandi Sabo, in 1997. The SGPC officials themselves called me to be appointed parcharak (preacher). I was then appointed chief granthi and ‘katha vachak’ two years later, then I was appointed Takht Damdama Sahib jathedar in May 2017, ”he said. “I have always said that the Sikh religion offers equal recognition for all,” he added.
He appointed Acting Akal Takht Jathedar in October 2018.
Bibi Jagir Kaur’s caste – Lubana, classified BC – is widely known as it rose through the ranks of political life after becoming an MP in 1997. It also has the distinction of being the first female president of the SGPC.
When asked, she said that during her uninterrupted stay in the Sikh representative body for the past 25 years, she never took into account the caste background of the granthis, ragis, preachers or other employees. “There may be several in the past and currently in service that could come from what are called lower castes or SC backgrounds. People here don’t really care or question the caste background of the granthis, hazoori ragis in Darbar Sahib or other historical gurdwaras, ”she said. Darbar Sahib is the central sanctuary of the Sikhs.
Former SGPC secretary Kulwant Singh Randhawa, who served the representative body for more than 43 years after joining it in 1956, also shared the same observations.
Other notable examples
Elder Akal Takht Jathedar Bhai Ranjit Singh is from Ramgarhia, notified as BC in Punjab. The late Giani Bhagwan Singh, who remained as the head of the granthi of Akal Takht, was also from what are called the lower castes. Former SGPC chairman Professor Kirpal Singh Badungar was also from British Columbia. Darbar Sahib Hazoori Ragi and Padma Shri Prize winner Bhai Nirmal Singh, whose death from Covid last year left the community in mourning across the world, was also of Sikh Mazhabi descent. He was trained at the Missionary College run by the SGPC in Amritsar.
Dozens of granthis, ragis are from SC, BC
Saroop Singh Kadiana, who has led a “dhadi jatha” for 31 years and also ran as the AAP candidate from the reserve headquarters in Phillaur in 2017, said neither before nor after, when ‘we knew he was of SC origin. , he encountered problems. “In fact, many granthis, ragis, dhadis and preachers are from what are called the lower castes and they serve in different gurdwaras in towns and villages. From my anecdotal knowledge, I can say that it is possible that most of them are from SC or BC backgrounds, ”he said. Responding to a question, he revealed that one member of his group were Ramdasia Sikhs (SC) and two were Jat Sikhs. “Most of the dhadi and ragi jathas are said to be people from different castes,” said Kadiana, who comes from the Sikh community of Ramdasia.
Manjit Singh Raj, a Ludhiana-based ragi who comes from the Mazhabi Sikh community, said to be the lowest on the caste ladder, says even his own jatha (group) is a mix. “I have been practicing gurbani singing for seven years and have never encountered any caste issues, although I have been in different gurdwaras across Punjab and outside. People don’t care in the first place, and even though they know it has never been a problem, ”he said.
Why SC among the Sikhs?
“In Sikhism, there is no place for caste stratification. The Sikh leader, Master Tara Singh, had certain castes included among the Sikhs in the planned list of castes with great effort, as those who had joined the Sikh fold of the “lower castes” were still largely economically disadvantaged and deserved to benefit from a reserve for economic upliftment. Granthis and ragis coming from SC backgrounds is the utmost recognition not only of their religious and social emancipation, but also of the complete reversal of caste disabilities, ”said former IAS officer and noted Sikh author Gurtej Singh .
How the Sikh SCs got the reservation
“Sikhs from the ‘lower castes’ were denied the reservation originally in the Constitution even though Akali Dal’s Sikh representatives in the Constituent Assembly had requested it. Interior Minister Sardar Patel strongly opposed the CA. After making further efforts, Master Tara Singh wrote to the President of India on April 4, 1953 on the matter. Eventually he threatened unrest in Delhi and left with a jatha from Anandpur Sahib on October 1, 1953. He and other Sikh activists were on their way when Prime Minister JL Nehru intervened and four castes – Mazhabis, Ramdasias, Kabir Panthis (Julahas) and Sikligars – have been included in the SC list for reservation, ”said Tarlochan Singh, former member of Rajya Sabha and former chairman of the National Commission for Minorities.
Mazhabi Sikh makes the biggest component
The Mazhabi Sikhs come from the “lowest rung of the caste ladder”. They share their caste origin with the ‘ati-shudra’ Balmikis. They make up the largest portion of SC Sikhs and also among all SCs with an enrollment of 25.62 lakh in the 2011 census. Additionally, 2.07 lakh (24%) among those who mentioned their caste as Balmiki / Bhangi also identified themselves as Sikhs.
Population pie 2011
Total population of Punjab | 2.77 crore
Total SC population | 88.60 lakh (31.9%)
SC Sikhs | 53.90 lakh (19.4%)
SC Hindus | 34.42 lakh (12.4%)
SC Buddhists | 27 390
Total Sikh population | 1.60 crore (57.69%)
Total Hindu population | 1.06 crore (38.49%)
Main SC communities in the Punjab and their religious identities (in lakhs) with the exception of Buddhists in the 2011 census
Total Sikh Hindu Buddhists
Mazhabi / Mazhabi Sikh 26.33 25.62 0.71 160
Balmiki / Bhangi 8.66 2.07 6.57 1,588
Ad-dharmi 10.17 0.86 9.12 18,778
Ramdasia / Ravidsaia 20.78 6.29 14.43 5,896

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I can’t let go: nuanced portrayals of flawed feminism in “10 things I hate about you”, despite its sexist plot https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/i-cant-let-go-nuanced-portrayals-of-flawed-feminism-in-10-things-i-hate-about-you-despite-its-sexist-plot/ Sun, 18 Jul 2021 02:39:49 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/i-cant-let-go-nuanced-portrayals-of-flawed-feminism-in-10-things-i-hate-about-you-despite-its-sexist-plot/ In I can’t let go we revisit the nostalgia around our favorite pop culture moments that have not aged well. For actress Julia Stiles, “10 Things I Hate About You” was a stepping stone to mainstream cinema. But she has a struggling to watch the movie today – the regressive plot scaffolding makes it cringe […]]]>

In I can’t let go we revisit the nostalgia around our favorite pop culture moments that have not aged well.


For actress Julia Stiles, “10 Things I Hate About You” was a stepping stone to mainstream cinema. But she has a struggling to watch the movie today – the regressive plot scaffolding makes it cringe a bit.

The film is derived from Shakespeare’s famous play “The Tame Shrew” – where the shrew is a gruesome portrayal of a woman and the man is tasked with “taming” her. Adapted for a Hollywood installation in 1999, as a teen comedy, the film was meant to be an upgrade, a more palatable version of the play.

And while “10 Things I Hate About You” succeeds in eliminating blatant misogyny, he doesn’t really abandon the regressive plot. Here’s how it goes: a middle school, overprotective dad with two daughters. The younger (Bianca) cannot go out until the older Kat (who is presented as a “prude”) who hates men finds a boyfriend, according to the father’s dictate. So the person interested in Bianca pay Patrick (the magnificent Heath Ledger) to woo Kat. Of course, Patrick tries to change her and Kat ends up letting her guard down.

Women onscreen bow to sexist and reductive stereotypes – the idea that women should change to please men, or feminists are inherently angry, or that conventional “girly-girls” deserve contempt. Not to mention the disturbing morality of sexuality and the acceptance of the body (the sluts’ shame was relentless), the reductive character models that locked them into clichés, and the upper-middle-class white-dominated scenario.

Adapting sexist literary works for a Hollywood audience is any improvement looks like a large improvement. Credit is due: Heath Ledger’s Patrick was far from the parody of his Shakespearean counterpart Lucentio. But language laden with sexism, prejudice and misogyny still exists. So while “10 Things I Hate About You” might be a better version of the play, the film has joined the league of other sexist cinematic representations like “Cruel Intentions” (2000) or “Never Been Kissed” (1999). .

Intent and action aside, the film has a cultural life of its own and deserves close scrutiny. To that end, here’s why I agree with the film’s imperfections. Julia Stiles (Kat) is a feminist; she is also angry. The devil’s attitude perhaps resides in her with resilience. She has a right being angry, as someone born of the injustices women face and who has decades of internalized misogyny within them.

Kat hates her sister because she’s feminine and “too girly” (the good old rhetoric “I’m not like all girls”), so Kat’s feminism isn’t perfect. But the film puts her in the spotlight without tipping the scales against her. While the ’90s feminist is still a pawn of the system, she’s still aware of the social rules in which she operates (and something she’s anxious to reject) – the friction within is hard to miss. Her feminism is flawed, but strong, something that resonates decades later.


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In the collective male consciousness, Kat is seen as a “nervous prude,” and Cameron’s attempt to pay someone to court her reinforces restrictive ideas about sex and sexuality.

But “10 Things” never gives the impression that Kat lost, when she opens up to Patrick. She can resist any regressive dynamic while still feeling love, attraction and the like. Even when she finds out about the bet, she doesn’t wallow, claiming it as a victory for herself.

Coming to the men in the film, the legendary “tamers”: the constructions that surround them are deeply problematic – betting on the choices of the woman, trying to bend her to their will, the father who wants to control his daughters.

Which does not exclude the character of Patrick. So much has been said about feminism in “10 Things,” except for Patrick’s “dreamboat” type character. Comedies for teenagers tend to eliminate issues of consent, aggression, while presenting sexual experiences as “conquests” for the man; Patrick, on the other hand, is aware of consent. There’s a scene where Kat is insanely drunk and he refuses to kiss her – he’s right.

While the film might not have the best diversity or gender-neutral language, it seems to be very aware of its flaws. A scene with the black English teacher (Mr. Morgan) shows it: he berates Kat for her problems as a rich white girl who is deaf to socio-cultural realities. Her anger is a privilege and she ignores injustice because she can. But the lack of understanding – or empathy – does not detract from the seriousness of the social stratification – “10 Things” may have called the feminist angry for her lack of intersectional thinking.

It feels like a movie of its moment – from 1999, of how feminism, high school romance, ideas about gender and social structures played out. “The jokes, the clothes and especially the music really make me feel that year, when I was in high school,” said cultural writer Alissa Wilkinson. notes in Vox. While it might be enough to salvage the film based on the nostalgia of the 1990s high school romantic comedy, it’s also worth praising the film for letting ideals and flaws coexist. Imperfections do not spoil what is Assumed to be.

Self-reflection not only criticizes Shakespeare’s cultural tropes, but also those that persisted into the ’90s – hell, even now. This is precisely why it is difficult to drop “10 things”. The movie is better but imperfect, sexist but again progressive – show a story before and of its time.

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Blog: When the virtual world is fairer: why more young people are addicted to gambling https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/blog-when-the-virtual-world-is-fairer-why-more-young-people-are-addicted-to-gambling/ Fri, 16 Jul 2021 12:26:31 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/blog-when-the-virtual-world-is-fairer-why-more-young-people-are-addicted-to-gambling/ (ThinkChina) – Tech scholar Yin Ruizhi examines the psychology of entering “the zone” when playing games and the comfort of being immersed in a more equal world. Gambling is addictive and generally has a bad influence on people, especially those who are not yet adults. Many articles today highlight the serious negative effects of gambling […]]]>

(ThinkChina) – Tech scholar Yin Ruizhi examines the psychology of entering “the zone” when playing games and the comfort of being immersed in a more equal world.

Gambling is addictive and generally has a bad influence on people, especially those who are not yet adults. Many articles today highlight the serious negative effects of gambling addiction on society, but there is little discussion of why gambling is addictive.

The addictiveness of games is based on two factors. One is related to human nature, or to what is called the “flow” or “the area”. And the second is linked to the question of equity in society.

Human behavior

Zone refers to a state of full focus and concentration when we block everything out while performing a task. When this happens, you feel like there is no time. And when the task is done, you feel energized and satisfied. Very often when we do something stimulating that we love and are good at, we easily get into the zone, such as rock climbing, swimming, playing ball games, playing games, reading, playing a game. instrument and even work.

To enter the zone, the task in question must have the unique characteristic of being just at the right level for its ability. If it’s too easy, there is no challenge and we would be bored; if it is too difficult, we will give up because there is no more hope. The games are an “arena” designed on the basis of this principle. The games are adjusted to different difficulty levels, in order to match the difficulty with the ability of the player. At the same time, the games have parameters to collect various data to quantify and evaluate performance, so that players have a clear benchmark to increase their abilities, which makes it easier for them to improve.

Such settings can keep people in the area for long periods of time, and the skills of players in the game develop naturally as they spend more time there. So, gamers usually don’t hold back the time they spend playing the game which makes it look like addicting.

Societal factors

The social factors behind gambling addiction are a byproduct of the area. First of all, we need to understand what kind of society drives young people to gambling addiction. The answer is: a society with a big income disparity and a big gap between rich and poor.

According to a Newzoo report, estimated global gaming revenue in 2020 was around $ 159.3 billion, up 9.3% from the previous year. The gaming market in Europe was worth around $ 29.6 billion, or roughly 19% of global revenue, behind North America ($ 40 billion) and the Asia-Pacific region ($ 78.4 billion). The games market in China was worth around $ 43 billion.

North America has a population of less than 600 million, while Europe has nearly 800 million, and Europe’s high-income group is comparable to that of North America. North. So why is the gaming market in Europe so much smaller than that of North America, if not China? The entire European gaming market is only around 70% of the Chinese market, which has a much smaller high-income group than Europe.

A fairer society in an imaginary world

With technological improvements, the complexity and richness of today’s games have far surpassed the Tetris block era. Since the days of World of Warcraft, many games have evolved into an independent virtual world parallel to the real physical world. As issues such as high house prices, generational poverty due to high costs of education, and social stratification worsen in the real world, those virtual worlds where participants are on par with their peers become extremely attractive. This is also the fundamental reason for an easily overlooked but crucial change in the gaming industry that has taken place since 2015.

Right now, the most popular and profitable game on the planet is Honor of Kings, released in 2015 by Tencent Games. Before this historic game hit the scene, the general profit model for games was ‘pay to win’, where people paid the gaming platform to move up to higher and harder levels faster in the game. gaming. But after 2015, the top-grossing games have all operated on the “pay for passion” principle, where users don’t get stronger in gaming just because they have money; players can only become stronger by continuing to invest time in honing their skills. Profits from the game come from everyday consumer items in the virtual world, such as outfits. The virtual game world is becoming a “fair” world, and people are willing to spend on ordinary items here because they love their character and the role they play in this virtual world.

In general, gambling addiction can cause serious social problems, but the complexity of the addiction is often overlooked. Clear criticism of games and gambling addicts without real understanding of the complex social reasons behind gambling addiction is meaningless and futile.

This story was first published in Think China.

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Cameron Smith: The Broken Lens of Critical Race Theory https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/cameron-smith-the-broken-lens-of-critical-race-theory/ Wed, 14 Jul 2021 16:07:13 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/cameron-smith-the-broken-lens-of-critical-race-theory/ This is an opinion column. Conservative parents across the country are outraged by the Critical Racial Theory (CRT) that is seeping into their children’s classrooms. The Liberals retort that the CRT is not a new idea and that it is not intended for young students. They present the opposition to the CRT as proof of […]]]>

This is an opinion column.

Conservative parents across the country are outraged by the Critical Racial Theory (CRT) that is seeping into their children’s classrooms. The Liberals retort that the CRT is not a new idea and that it is not intended for young students. They present the opposition to the CRT as proof of the “fragility of white people”. Although CRT has been around for a long time, it ties in with Marxism and many other ideas that we should systematically identify, understand and reject, whether taught in our elementary schools or not.

Let’s go beyond the idea that there is a version of history that is just the facts. We choose historical events to teach the next generation and provide a lens to visualize them. Every aspect of education is an intentional choice. Teaching that America is a land of opportunity is a goal. The view that responsibility and individual choices are important in our country is another. CRT is, at its core, another perspective on the impact of American history on our current experience.

Critical race theorists view the social and economic stratification of American society as the product of racial exploitation. CRT presents American governments and institutions as taking advantage of several socially constructed races for the benefit of one.

If looking at society through the prism of exploitation sounds familiar to you, it’s because Karl Marx popularized it as an economic theory in the mid-19th century.

Many supporters of the CRT naturally bristle at the idea of ​​being associated with Marxism. The ultimate realization of Marxist theory is full communism which still don’t fly with most Americans. We don’t like the idea of ​​a centrally controlled state where the government is all-powerful.

Yet the ideological link between the two schools of thought is undeniable. Marx viewed capitalism as the forced exploitation of workers (proletariat) by capitalists (bourgeoisie). The institution of slavery in America was, by definition, immoral capitalists who stole work on racial lines. CRT builds from there by characterizing US laws and governments as perpetuating racial exploitation.

Neither Marxism nor the CRT blames individuals who have taken advantage of their compatriots because of their economic position or their race. Instead, Marxism and the CRT attack the governing power structures themselves as the essential evil to be tackled. Where Marxism focuses on the economic practice of capitalism, the CRT views American legal institutions and paradigms as inherently racist. Both lead to the bizarre conclusion that class exploitation persists as long as institutions do. The actions and choices of specific individuals are largely irrelevant.

In 2019, Democracy now! broadcast a segment with Ibram X. Kendi, author and founding director of the Anti-Racist Research and Policy Center at American University, where he addressed topics ranging from gun violence to racism and the origins of capitalism. Kendi called capitalism and racism “Siamese twins”. According to him, “the origins of racism cannot be separated from the origins of capitalism… The life of capitalism cannot be separated from the life of racism”.

For the Marxist, there is no redemption for a capitalist society. It must finally give way to communism. No number of virtuous entrepreneurs could reverse its destructive nature. CRT suffers from the same defect. If America’s laws, institutions, and standards are irreparably racist, then no incremental positive change is enough.

Where Marx viewed capitalism as inevitably evolving into a classless communist state, critical race theorists see an opportunity to increase “fairness” in society. The Milken Institute for Public Health at George Washington University clarifies the difference between equality and equity: “Equality means that each individual or group of people receives the same resources or opportunities. Equity recognizes that each person has different circumstances and allocates the exact resources and opportunities necessary to achieve an equal result.

Both Marxism and CRT advocate a radical reorganization of American society where equity takes priority over freedom.

CRT is not equivalent to presenting an accurate account of American history. We can and should teach our past soberly and frankly. A whitewashed story is not a story at all. Teach about the international slave trade. Explain the origins of the abolitionist movement. Discuss the practical effects of empowerment for individuals in a society with few economic options. The Tulsa race slaughter, the civil rights era, and even modern developments with voting rights law can and should be discussed in classrooms in an age-appropriate manner.

The story might not be comfortable or clean, but we need to be honest about it and learn from it.

To reject CRT, Marxism or even capitalism is not to reject history. It is choosing our objective to see our past and build our future. We are free people who will not come to the same conclusions about what we want to teach our children. Our governments and our systems have mechanisms to resolve these disagreements civilly, and we should use them. America does not need a class revolution; he needs enough of us to strive for a more perfect union despite our nation’s past sins.

Smith is CEO of the Triptych Foundation, a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit. The Triptych Foundation promotes a virtuous society by investing in media and companies with social impact. He was most recently executive director of the Republican Policy Committee in the US House of Representatives. You can reach him at csmith@al.com.

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Chaco Canyon collapse: recent study challenges drought theory https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/chaco-canyon-collapse-recent-study-challenges-drought-theory/ Sat, 10 Jul 2021 21:59:52 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/chaco-canyon-collapse-recent-study-challenges-drought-theory/ In the center of the region across America, Chaco Canyon is a barren and desolate place, dotted with junipers, cacti, or the occasional solitary sage. Hundreds of ancient and mysterious structures haunt this canyon and the entire region, meticulously aligned along the paths of the Sun, Moon, and the constellation Orion. Known as the Grandes […]]]>

In the center of the region across America, Chaco Canyon is a barren and desolate place, dotted with junipers, cacti, or the occasional solitary sage. Hundreds of ancient and mysterious structures haunt this canyon and the entire region, meticulously aligned along the paths of the Sun, Moon, and the constellation Orion.

Known as the Grandes Maisons du Chaco, these structures include sunken ceremonial chambers known as kivas, cliff dwellings, watchtowers, huge facades, and long, massive “roads” that seem to get nowhere. This culture emerged around 900 AD, but around 1100 to 1200 AD, the Great Houses were abandoned. Drought is frequently cited as the cause of the collapse and migration of this mysterious culture, but now the latest research is casting doubt on these deforestation and drought assumptions and presenting a more horrific alternative.

Understanding This Complex Chacoan Building Frenzy

The Hopi, Ute, Shoshone, Navajo, and contemporary Puebloans all share some degree of ancestral history with this region. The Navajo and the Ute refer to the inhabitants of the Great Houses as the Anasazi, which means “old enemies” or “old enemies”. Contemporary Puebloans dislike the term, although some modern Navajo, Ute, and Hopi refuse to renounce its use. Conscientious experts have attempted to sidestep this awkward tension by referring to these people, and this culture, as Chacoan.

Who exactly these people were, they took an accurate survey of the landscape upon their arrival and launched a frenzy of complex construction projects. They dealt with the problems of the inhospitable land by establishing a cult that involved periodic pilgrimages and the delivery of offerings to these sacred sites.

The raw materials used to create these astro-temples were not readily available, so sandstone and wood were transported great distances. Massive woods were needed to line the roofs of the kivas. These large timbers have been collected so far away that archaeologists remain uncertain as to their origins. Small springs were used, but it appears that the locals depended on and controlled a network of offerings that flowed from the north and south. Meanwhile, archaeological evidence has only uncovered several hundred strange burials.

Certain rooms in the Grande Maison, which at first glance appear to be rooms, show no sign of habitation. These rooms often have no exit or light, and are too closed even for there to be a fire inside. Experts hypothesize that the grandeur of the building itself was the goal, and these “rooms” are in fact only walled spaces used to add size and visual imposition.

Digital reconstruction of the ancient Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico before the site was mysteriously abandoned. ( Public domain )

The Native American narrative and the obligatory mysteries of the Chaco

Today, archaeologists and anthropologists work with Native Americans who have ancestral connections to the ruins. But despite this cooperation, there remain persistent elements of tension, taboo and secrecy. Some natives of the region refuse to discuss ancient culture fully, even among themselves, and those who speak openly do so with extreme caution, gentleness, and even with a pang of heart.

They speak of people in ancient times who had great spiritual power over animals, weather, and humans. They vaguely suggest that the natural order of things may have been altered in some way. In some cases, they will politely explain that some of their traditions are not meant to be repeated over and over again (especially to Europeans), or that they have migratory traditions that they themselves do not fully understand. But virtually all traditions hold that their ancestors emerged from the underworld and, guided by their ancestral demigods, deities and spirits, made a series of epic migrations.

Speaking of things that defy understanding, there are some weird elements of Chaco archeology that should be highlighted. This ruling elite of “religious specialists” had abnormal genetic traits that were revered. In a 2016 National Geographic article, Aaron Sidder explored the eerie reality that the ruling elite of Chaco culture had six fingers and toes. “We found that six-toed people in particular were common and appeared to be associated with important ritual structures and high-ranking objects like turquoise,” Sidder summed up when discussing his team’s findings at Chaco Canyon.

There is also a macabre element to this culture, which perhaps relates to the abandonment of sites – cannibalism. In January 2000, scientists Billman, Lambert, and Banks published an article via Cambridge University Press regarding Mesa Verde, another Chacoan site in southwest Colorado. “Cut marks and percussion scars involve humans in the disarticulation and reduction of these bodies,” the article explained in its report on the discovery of cannibalism. “Evidence of heat exposure on some bone fragments and laboratory analyzes of human coprolite recovered from one of the pit houses support the interpretation that people prepared and consumed parts of the human body. ”

Distribution of the great houses of Chaco Canyon.  (Wills, et. Al. / PNAS)

Distribution of the great houses of Chaco Canyon. (Wills, et al. / PNAS)

The outdated narrative of the collapse of drought and deforestation

Regional climate change, deforestation, topsoil erosion and prolonged periods of drought are generally cited as the main factors leading to the abandonment of the Great Houses and the extinction of the Chacoan culture. Geologists have determined that there was indeed a fifty-year drought that began around 1130 AD.

It is also commonly believed that the thousands of large timber needed to cover the kivas and pit houses have been overexploited, exacerbating the acute arid conditions. This is then interpreted as an inscription on the wall regarding unsustainable land use practices. However, savvy researchers have pointed out that the popularity of such theories has appeared to align well with modern campaigns regarding our own unsustainable land use practices, suggesting a lack of objectivity.

Wills, Drake and Wetherbee recently published their findings with the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America ( PNAS). “There is no direct evidence of human impacts on local forests during the Bonito phase [the period of high construction from AD 850 to 1150], no indication that agricultural fields have been destroyed by deforestation or any other process, and, surprisingly, no conclusive information on the amount and sources of archaeological timber, ”the researchers wrote in their perspective report.

“Indeed, the people of Chaco had sources of timber and other natural resources that were certainly less expensive than those shown in the Chaco Canyon collapse models. Construction models indicate that the overall energy investment in the large houses of the Chaco began to decline dramatically at the end of the Common Era [AD] Thousands, before the onset of any documented drought, and immigrants appear to have arrived in Chaco during the drought of the 12th century.

Archaeologists come to new conclusions thanks to the analysis of the remains of the Great Houses of Chaco Canyon.  (kojihirano / Adobe Stock)

Archaeologists come to new conclusions thanks to the analysis of the remains of the Great Houses of Chaco Canyon. ( kojihirano / Adobe Stock)

Alternative Conclusions: Discovering Clues Indices at Chaco Canyon

The abandonment of the Great Chaco Houses in Chaco Canyon has left some interesting clues. For example, it is certain that the huge beams that covered the kivas were deliberately and individually removed. It might seem like a relatively easy task, but the systematic removal of all that massive timber must have been a huge labor-intensive project, roughly equivalent to some of the constructions.

It is also important to note that the entrances to the kivas have been walled up, which is strange, because once the framework is removed, the sealing of the doors hardly prevents access to the structure. Perhaps the most fascinating clue is that only some of the large kivas, where the ruling elite of cannibalistic polydactyls resided, are marked by fire damage.

Fire damage, reliance on offerings, ritualized murder, and high degree of social stratification may point to a popular Chaco revolt as the cause of the collapse. When a small group or clan of despotic rulers depends on and controls a population of common people, conflicts will inevitably erupt between the two radically divided classes.

This is especially common when the majority population becomes stressed and far outstrips their oppressors. The local tribes may have been subjected to the relentless demands of the “henchman squads”, who operated under the deception of religious obligation, this combined with a hostile environment is only a matter of time. until the exploited caste reaches a breaking point.

Imagine people at the time, not having enough food to eat, water to drink, and on top of these difficulties, being ordered to participate in construction projects while their loved ones were abducted, butchered. and devoured. It is not difficult to imagine that after generations of hardship and suffering, these oppressed classes in Chaco Canyon revolted violently against their overlords cult leaders, dismantled their sacred spaces and set fire to the great kiva, never to return.

Top image: The remains of Pueblo Bonito, the largest of the great houses in the Chaco du Chaco Canyon. Source: Victor Posnov / Adobe Stock

By Mark Andrew Carpenter

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Does the world need a Vax Global Passport? https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/does-the-world-need-a-vax-global-passport/ Thu, 08 Jul 2021 08:34:17 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/does-the-world-need-a-vax-global-passport/ Governments around the world are exploring the potential benefits of using a ‘vaccine passport’ as a way to reopen the economy by identifying and authorizing only those who are protected against COVID-19 As the consequences of the pandemic continue to hit international trade and businesses across sectors, a concerted attempt is underway to develop and […]]]>

Governments around the world are exploring the potential benefits of using a ‘vaccine passport’ as a way to reopen the economy by identifying and authorizing only those who are protected against COVID-19

As the consequences of the pandemic continue to hit international trade and businesses across sectors, a concerted attempt is underway to develop and deploy potential technologies such as digital and biometric passports. Travel lanes are slowly opening up for those vaccinated with the prospect of the “digital vaccination certificate / passport” as an integral part of international travel. A digital vaccine tracking system, the “vaccine passport” is a form of electronic certificate that provides proof of vaccination and COVID-19 test results. Yet they require international or national coordination on best practices for implementing cross-border vaccination passes.

As the world awaits herd immunity, millions of vaccinated people around the world anxiously await the business and operational plans on the vaccination horizon. Border checkpoints are rekindling vigilance around the world and countries are exploring new methodologies to revive international travel, a critical social and business component today

As COVID-19 vaccines are deployed around the world and testing becomes customary for international travel, many tech companies and healthcare organizations are collaborating to ensure access to a secure digital record of their Covid-19 vaccine status . Several companies and technology groups have developed applications or systems for smartphones allowing individuals to download the details of their COVID-19 tests and vaccinations and thus create digital credentials allowing entry into a place, a university, a workplace, hotels, public transport, tourist destinations or cross-border travel.

The World Health Organization is also working on a smart vaccination certificate, which will provide guidelines and standards for each digital vaccine passport. A number of agencies, including UNICEF, ITU and the European Commission, are contributing with WHO to this initiative. The finalized specifications and standards for digital vaccination certificates will be designed to link to national and cross-border digital systems.

The apparent technical issues and growing ethical concerns surrounding COVID infection and risk stratification based on immunological status involve various considerations. WHO has already alerted to concerns related to the ethical acceptability of immunity certification. If a standardized and widely accepted pass emerges, it will eliminate the need to carry physical documents. Giving credibility to online certification can make travel fair, safe, inclusive and convenient. Still, there are concerns and considerations and a few are listed below.

Implementation and precision issues:

  • Vaccination does not prevent viral infection, as successes indicating “negative test” results are not valid for a long time. Coronavirus negative test results should only be validated for tests performed within 72 hours of the traveler’s departure.
  • WHO cautions against rapid antigen tests performed at most airlines, which may be “less appropriate” than molecular PCR tests to allow international travel. Attention to test errors is essential.
  • The percentage of effectiveness of a particular brand of vaccine in preventing transmission is still debatable. People who are vaccinated are still able to catch and spread the disease.
  • The global vaccine supply is limited to relying solely on the vaccine passport to travel for up to a long period
  • Should be built on a platform of interoperable technologies allowing different systems to work together across country borders
  • Require fundamentally secure and tamper-proof measures throughout the verification system with strong access control and thus protect against cyber attacks
  • It is also essential to adopt the vaccine passports that are the simplest, the cheapest, the most reliable, scalable, resistant to fraud, and yet extremely precise on a scientific basis.

Security and privacy concerns:

  • Ensure protection against non-consensual identification, breach of confidentiality and abuse of data through stricter government policies on vaccination witnessing electronic systems or mobile applications
  • Secure binding of test results to biometric identifiers or a protected digital identity can be enabled to minimize fraudulent health and vaccine certificates
  • Legal and regulatory mechanisms should be in place to limit access to data to legitimate government authorities and third parties only to the extent of the intended purpose.
  • Incentives and Counterfeits: The perceived benefits of immune certificates could also result in an illicit market for counterfeit certificates. Only authorized bodies should certify approved laboratories and certificates should be issued only by legal health authorities.

Ethical and equality concerns.

  • Vaccination of the world’s population is a protracted process due to inequalities in vaccine distribution. Rich countries have gotten more doses and many poor countries have yet to receive their first vaccine. This could create a situation in which only rich countries that have obtained enough vaccines could have access to travel and low-income countries would lose the benefit of travel.
  • Potential problems could arise around the younger generation who would be the last to be vaccinated.
  • The collection, processing and storage of data must be limited to the minimum applications necessary to achieve only public health and socio-economic objectives.
  • Attention necessary for the certification of people who cannot be vaccinated for specific reasons or health problems (pregnant, breastfeeding, immunocompromised, specific drug treatment, etc.)

To know more about Efforts in Asia-Pacific for the vaccine passport Click on Here

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Kwibohora 27: Rwanda’s envoy to Belgium talks about his journey of transformation | New times https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/kwibohora-27-rwandas-envoy-to-belgium-talks-about-his-journey-of-transformation-new-times/ Mon, 05 Jul 2021 12:12:14 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/kwibohora-27-rwandas-envoy-to-belgium-talks-about-his-journey-of-transformation-new-times/ Rwandans living in Belgium and Luxembourg on Sunday July 4 converged both physically and virtually to celebrate Liberation Day, an event that was marked by learning about Rwanda’s journey of liberation and transformation. Rwandan Ambassador to Belgium Dieudonné Rugambwa Sebashongore explained that July 4, 1994 marked the end of a 100-day genocide against the Tutsi […]]]>

Rwandans living in Belgium and Luxembourg on Sunday July 4 converged both physically and virtually to celebrate Liberation Day, an event that was marked by learning about Rwanda’s journey of liberation and transformation.

Rwandan Ambassador to Belgium Dieudonné Rugambwa Sebashongore explained that July 4, 1994 marked the end of a 100-day genocide against the Tutsi which claimed more than a million victims and whose remains are still found 27 years later.

Explaining to the audience the immediate tasks of the RPF following the liberation struggle, he said;

“We had to take stock of the country, define a framework and create bodies dedicated to the implementation of the reconstruction of our nation. This framework was discussed during debates organized in the village of Urugwiro between 1998 and 1999 which prepared the ground for the new constitution, adopted by the people in 2003 ”, he declared.

In terms of governance, he said, they were faced with the challenge of restoring justice while keeping in mind the unity and reconciliation of the people.

“We have found solutions in tradition and our traditional Gacaca courts,” he said, referring to the judicial system in which nearly two million cases of genocide and related crimes have been tried.

He said that another endemic problem that the new government wanted to nip in the bud was corruption, leading to the establishment of the Ombudsman’s Office which helped regulate obstacles to economic development.

Economically, he said, the Rwanda Revenue Authority was created to improve tax administration and gradually allow the country to finance its national budget and reduce its dependence on international aid. .

In the current budget, the implementation of which began at the beginning of this month, 67% of expenditure will be mobilized at the national level.

In terms of social development, the creation of social protection interventions such as the community health insurance scheme (Mutuelle de Santé) which allows every Rwandan to receive basic health care is an important step, he said. declared.

He added that locally inspired solutions such as the Ubudehe social stratification program and the Girinka one cow per family program have also helped reduce poverty.

The government, through the Rwanda Development Board (RDB), has also prioritized establishing a favorable business and investment climate for the private sector to thrive and catalyze overall economic growth.

Other notable achievements include gender equality, which the envoy noted has surpassed initial targets, with 61% women in parliament and over 50% in Cabinet.

He added that millions of people were lifted out of poverty.

Unity and reconciliation

Senator Marie-Rose Mureshyankwano, who addressed the participants virtually, reiterated that enormous progress has been made in promoting unity and reconciliation while healing genocide survivors.

She said that the Gacaca courts were not only used to bring the perpetrators of the genocide to justice, they also facilitated the country’s path to reconciliation.

The legislator noted other initiatives like Ndi-umunyarawanda as one of the local solutions that played a major role in unifying communities severely fractured by genocide.

editor@newtimesrwanda.com

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