Social policy – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 02:25:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png Social policy – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 What defending Australia really means https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/what-defending-australia-really-means/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 01:08:15 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/what-defending-australia-really-means/ Calls for Australia to achieve complete self-sufficiency in defense ignore deliberate, pragmatic and fundamentally cost-based policy choices about the role of its armed forces over the past three decades, writes Charles Knight. Recently, foreign editor of The Australian Greg Sheridan wrote a caustic open letter to Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Defense Minister Richard Marles, […]]]>

Calls for Australia to achieve complete self-sufficiency in defense ignore deliberate, pragmatic and fundamentally cost-based policy choices about the role of its armed forces over the past three decades, writes Charles Knight.

Recently, foreign editor of The Australian Greg Sheridan wrote a caustic open letter to Prime Minister Anthony Albanese and Defense Minister Richard Marles, arguing for major defense reform.

He diagnoses serious ills, including the uncertain supply of defense materials, but the crux of his argument is “Everyone knows we can’t defend ourselves, but no one at Defense ever says so”. This is said as if it were a shocking revelation and a fundamental criticism of the Australian Department of Defence, the Australian Defense Force (ADF) and all they stand for.

But this is not at all a revolutionary position. In fact, it’s a truism. Australia has explicitly and pragmatically chosen to rely on a stronger ally for defense since Federation in 1901. This reflects the Australian public’s enduring support for the alliance and the likely understanding of dependence on United States for support such as nuclear umbrella, ammunition resupply. or personnel and platforms to defend vast coasts, seas and islands.

This support is explicit in academic analysis, whether 40 years ago in Rethinking Australia’s Defense or in recent work responding to our changing geostrategic situation, such as Australia’s defence: Towards a New Era, Australia’s American Alliance: Towards a New Era, and After American Primacy: Imagining the Future of Australian Defence.

Rather than contesting or bemoaning this lingering reality, Australian defense commentators and policy makers should recognize and engage with it and its costs and benefits. This provides a starting point to explain how a smaller, professional, well-trained and expeditionary ADF defended them and Australia’s interests in supporting the United States and its interventions. This would better position defense policymakers to debate with critics the benefits of this alliance.

It would not just be about acting to save face. This would also highlight its drawbacks. By recognizing that Australia cannot currently “defend” itself, those who rightly criticize the moral, political and strategic costs of enthusiastic support for the alliance might better understand its reasons.

Critics could be directed constructively to overcome the political problem of persuading the public to accept the massive financial and social costs of seemingly ethically superior alternatives such as armed neutrality. This approach will also highlight the serious risks Australia faces if its alliance with the United States weakens or fails.

In 2019 Hugh White of the Australian National University wrote How to defend Australia. The book is driven by its assessment that US military power is in decline.

Importantly, he points out that Australia in the past never intended to ‘defend itself’ in any absolute sense.

Even at the height of the Keating government’s strategy to implement the 1994 White Paper, Defending Australia, the assumption was that self-reliance meant only the ability to defeat small raiding forces and impose enormous costs to an invader, not complete self-sufficiency in the face of a large and determined adversary.

IIts authors – of which Hugh White was one – explicitly understood that any enemy capable of projecting an invasion force against Australia could only be defeated with the help of the United States, and this position has not changed. .

This is perhaps where the disagreement begins over what ‘defending Australia’ means – and this is where Hugh White’s book comes in. It systematically unpacks issues ranging from obligations to Papua New Guinea to failing to achieve maritime supremacy to securing sea lanes, providing a helpful framework for outlining what Australia can and cannot do.

White argues that, in descending order of priority, Australia should be able to defend the continent independently of direct attack by a major power, to deny bases in the inner arc of the islands to the north to a major Asian power independently, and to use force to support order, constitutional government and internal stability among our smaller neighbors.

In addition to this, it must be able to make at least a substantial, and perhaps even decisive or leading, military contribution to a regional coalition to resist major power intrusion into the Indonesian archipelago. , and make a meaningful contribution to the coalition in any power struggle across Asia-Pacific.

The great contribution of How to defend Australia is to identify for discussion that the first two points, the defense of the continent and the denial of bases, cannot currently be done without external support.

To make up for this shortfall, White proposes greater autonomy via a strategy of maritime denial, which aims to prevent the adversary from freely using the sea, which unsurprisingly echoes the White Paper. Its prescriptions have been strongly contested, in particular on the costs.

Massive organizational changes and similar expense are evident in other approaches that seek complete ‘autonomy’. In the 1980s David Martin championed armed neutrality for Australia, and recently Dr Albert Palazzo has taken the same approach. While these approaches do not meet White’s basics denial requirement, they could plausibly “defend the continent”.

Yesand, to deal with the deteriorating strategic situation, they must be implemented quickly, require enormous cost and effort, and perhaps most important of all, require a social license to succeed.

Indeed, has Australia ever adopted such a drastic change in policy before a war hit her?

To go somewhere, Australia needs to know where it is starting from. Perhaps the most important conversation is why the leaders never acknowledge that the ADF cannot “defend” Australia, but it is important to note that they were never asked to do so – after all, it’s a much clearer position to start an increasingly urgent public conversation.

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DSWD and UNICEF to provide unconditional cash assistance to 22,000 typhoon-vulnerable families in Catanduanes, N. Samar – Manila Bulletin https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dswd-and-unicef-to-provide-unconditional-cash-assistance-to-22000-typhoon-vulnerable-families-in-catanduanes-n-samar-manila-bulletin/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 01:37:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dswd-and-unicef-to-provide-unconditional-cash-assistance-to-22000-typhoon-vulnerable-families-in-catanduanes-n-samar-manila-bulletin/ Sealing the DSWD-UNICEF partnership on the provision of unconditional cash transfers under the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund for Advance Action for Foreseeable Risks are (left to right) DSWD Under-Secretary Felicisimo C. Budiongan, UNICEF Deputy Representatives for Programs Behzad Noubary, Landbank Marilou L. Villafranca, Senior Vice President, and UNICEF Social Policy Officer. Anjanette Saguisag. […]]]>
Sealing the DSWD-UNICEF partnership on the provision of unconditional cash transfers under the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund for Advance Action for Foreseeable Risks are (left to right) DSWD Under-Secretary Felicisimo C. Budiongan, UNICEF Deputy Representatives for Programs Behzad Noubary, Landbank Marilou L. Villafranca, Senior Vice President, and UNICEF Social Policy Officer. Anjanette Saguisag. (DSWD)

On June 14, the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) agreed to provide multipurpose and unconditional cash transfers to some 22,000 families in towns vulnerable to the typhoon. from Catanduanes and northern Samar.

Under the United Nations Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) for Anticipatory Action (AA) for foreseeable risks, an unconditional cash supplement will be provided to approximately 22,000 beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino (4Ps) program ), including 42,239 children, in the municipalities of Baras, Bato, San Andres and Virac in the province of Catanduanes, and the municipalities of Catarman, Catubig, Gamay, Mondragon and San Roque in northern Samar.

Assistance will be provided three days before the arrival of a category 4 typhoon, in accordance with the principles of anticipatory action.

Each family will receive 1,000 pesos per family, calculated as 30% of the children’s estimated minimum expenditure basket for nutrition, education, water, sanitation and hygiene, and child protection services .

Cash assistance will be provided to 4P beneficiaries through the Land Bank of the Philippines, the government’s depository bank.

In addition to complementary cash assistance, UNICEF will also pilot the provision of anticipatory multi-purpose cash transfers using existing national social protection systems to mitigate the impact of disasters and generate evidence to help shape the DSWD policies that strengthen national social protection. systems for future humanitarian and disaster response.

DSWD said the partnership is the product of the Philippine UN Humanitarian Country Team’s development of a fit-for-purpose framework framed by existing operational coordination mechanisms and response plans, and based on lessons learned and good practices from past typhoon preparedness and responses.

UNICEF Deputy Representative in the Philippines, Behzad Noubary, stressed the importance and urgency of partnership.

By providing support before a disaster strikes, CERF AA seeks to mitigate and, to some extent, prevent the impact of typhoons on people’s homes and livelihoods, while building on government mandatory preventative evacuation procedures that save lives.

“This is the first time that we will test the concept of anticipatory action through a shock-responsive social protection model. Thanks to this intervention, the communities most at risk will have better financial resources to bounce back from a typhoon. Traditional disaster response, when complemented with anticipatory actions, can significantly reduce the impact of disasters and enable faster recovery,” said Noubary.

DSWD Secretary Rolando Joselito Bautista, in a statement read by Undersecretary Felicisimo Budiongan, said: “This anticipatory action pilot project is a good start to test the provision of multipurpose anticipatory cash transfers using the existing national government social protection systems, in particular through the provision of top-up to beneficiaries of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino programme.

“In addition, this pilot project can generate evidence to improve policies for strengthening social protection systems within the department. Again, congratulations to all of you who participated in the benchmarking of anticipatory action in government systems,” said Bautista.

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Portman and Shaheen take part in a discussion hosted by Dartmouth on Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/portman-and-shaheen-take-part-in-a-discussion-hosted-by-dartmouth-on-russias-unprovoked-invasion-of-ukraine/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 23:16:32 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/portman-and-shaheen-take-part-in-a-discussion-hosted-by-dartmouth-on-russias-unprovoked-invasion-of-ukraine/ June 17, 2022 | Press Releases HANNOVER, NH – Today, U.S. Senators Rob Portman (R-OH), Co-Chair of the Ukrainian Senate Caucus, member of the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee and Dartmouth College alumnus, and Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), a senior Senate Foreign Relations Committee (SFRC) official, chair of the SFRC’s Subcommittee on Europe and Regional Security Cooperation […]]]>

June 17, 2022

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Press Releases

HANNOVER, NH – Today, U.S. Senators Rob Portman (R-OH), Co-Chair of the Ukrainian Senate Caucus, member of the Senate Foreign Affairs Committee and Dartmouth College alumnus, and Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), a senior Senate Foreign Relations Committee (SFRC) official, chair of the SFRC’s Subcommittee on Europe and Regional Security Cooperation and a member of Ukraine’s bipartisan caucus, participated in a discussion hosted by Dartmouth on the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The event, titled “Defending Ukraine: A Conversation with Senators Rob Portman and Jeanne Shaheenwas moderated by Professor Jason Barabas, who is director of the Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences at Dartmouth College, and moderated by Victoria Holt, director of the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding.

“I was honored to be back at my alma mater today and thank Dartmouth for hosting Senator Shaheen and I as we discussed President Putin’s wanton invasion of Ukraine. Throughout my tenure in the Senate, I have made it a priority to work across the aisle and find common ground with my colleagues from both parties, because I believe that is the best way to get things done for the American people. The Ukraine issue is just one more example where there is broad bipartisan support in the Senate and House to back the Ukrainian people in their fight for freedom from a brutal regime that wants to take control of their country. The United States must continue to stand on the side of freedom over tyranny and democracy and self-determination over authoritarianism and conquest,” said Portman.

“I appreciated that Dartmouth hosted Senator Portman and myself for a discussion today on the full-scale consequences of Putin’s bloody new invasion of Ukraine. Senator Portman has been a staunch partner of mine in the Senate, and together we harnessed the bipartisan momentum to fight Russian aggression and help Ukraine in its fight for survival. Ukrainians have shown remarkable resolve in the face of the brutal atrocities committed by Russian forces, and they deserve all available support to defend their people and their land,” said Shaheen. “This war in Ukraine is not just about Ukraine. It’s about the United States, Europe, and the survival of democracies around the world. We must face this pivotal moment in history with unwavering determination and ensure that democracy and independence prevail over authoritarianism.

Portman and Shaheen led bipartisan action in the Senate in favor of Ukraine in response to Vladimir Putin’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, which threatens the stability and security of Eastern Europe and NATO allies. In January, Portman and Shaheen led a bipartisan delegation to Ukraine, where they met with President Zelenskyy and members of his administration to discuss support efforts ahead of Russia’s unprovoked invasion. In February, Portman and Shaheen successfully conducted a bipartisan resolution reaffirming its support for Ukraine in a context of increased Russian aggression.

You can watch the entire discussion here.

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A professor will lead a forum on peace https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-professor-will-lead-a-forum-on-peace/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 18:02:28 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-professor-will-lead-a-forum-on-peace/ A FORUM is being organized on Monday June 20 by Let’s Talk Peace Ballarat and Compassionate Ballarat with the aim of informing people about the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Entitled Australia’s Role in Peacemaking: Insights from a Global Expert, the session will be led by Professor John Langmore at Federation University’s […]]]>

A FORUM is being organized on Monday June 20 by Let’s Talk Peace Ballarat and Compassionate Ballarat with the aim of informing people about the UN Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons.

Entitled Australia’s Role in Peacemaking: Insights from a Global Expert, the session will be led by Professor John Langmore at Federation University’s Brewery Tech Park Theatre.

He said the conference will focus on two key issues.

“Australia hasn’t signed this treaty yet, so I’m going to talk about why it’s so important that they do,” he said.

“The aim is to draw attention to diplomacy, negotiation and mediation as means of resolving conflicts rather than thinking that any conflict will automatically lead to violence.

“My second theme will cover the need for a better balance between the elements of foreign policy.”

A Q&A will follow the discussion, with fellow Fed Uni, Dr. Lynne Reeder, as MC.

Professor Langmore was enlisted by Let’s Talk Peace Ballarat co-host Madonna Quixley, who said his expertise in global issues made him the prime candidate to deliver the speech.

“John is certainly qualified. He was the director of the UN’s social policy and development division and he helped launch the Peacebuilding Initiative campaign that led to this,” she said.

“He is doing a lot of the groundwork to pave the way for this movement in Australia and has been instrumental in getting things started again at Melbourne United with his peace efforts.”

Professor Langmore will also use the platform to update attendees on a new development at one of Melbourne’s institutions.

“Another key topic of the day is to let people know about the peacebuilding center I am establishing at the University of Melbourne,” he said.

“And it’s just important that this information is available to everyone and I’m impressed that these groups exist in Ballarat which gives me the opportunity to talk to people. It is a universal message.

The forum will take place from 12 p.m. and is open to all.

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Florida First-Gen Teen Gets All Ivy League Colleges https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/florida-first-gen-teen-gets-all-ivy-league-colleges/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 00:45:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/florida-first-gen-teen-gets-all-ivy-league-colleges/ A teenager from Florida, who is a first-generation Nigerian-American, has a wide variety of Ivy League schools to choose from – all of them. Ashley Adirika, a debate champion who hopes to help reduce income inequality, has traveled to Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Penn, Princeton and Yale. “The tears just started to flow. Like […]]]>

A teenager from Florida, who is a first-generation Nigerian-American, has a wide variety of Ivy League schools to choose from – all of them.

Ashley Adirika, a debate champion who hopes to help reduce income inequality, has traveled to Brown, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Penn, Princeton and Yale.

“The tears just started to flow. Like they were starting to flow,” she told ABC News of her reaction to finding out.

“My siblings and I were really excited, like screaming, jumping around. It was crazy.”

The budding scholar, who went to high school at Miami Beach Senior High School, was also accepted to Stanford, Vanderbilt and Emory.

“I just decided to shoot each one and see if it would land – and I didn’t know I would be accepted into all of them,” the 17-year-old student told CNN.

Ashley ended up choosing to study at Harvard.
Instagram / Ashley Adirika

“I remember crying a lot and being extremely surprised.”

Ashley ended up choosing Harvard, which only accepted a record 3.19% of applications for the Class of 2026.

“Before the college application process, Yale was actually my first choice. But when I did more research on what I want to do specifically, which is explorations in politics and social policy and things of that nature, Harvard just had a better program,” Ashley said. , adding that she wanted to study how policies can improve income disparities. .

Ashley has always dreamed of attending an Ivy League school.
Ashley has always dreamed of attending an Ivy League school.
Instagram / Ashley Adirika

She will begin her studies in the Ivy League in the fall and plans to go to law school after completing her undergraduate degree.

“I’m really passionate about politics and using politics to empower communities. And so in the short term, for me, it feels like becoming a lawyer,” she said.

“But in the long term, I want to use this as a platform to do political work.”

Adirika was recruited into her school’s debate team when she was in eighth grade.

“Everyone knew Ashley because of her intelligence. She had test results through the roof,” said Bess Rodriguez, a seventh grade English teacher who recruited her.

“When we were going to the debates, the other kids, when they saw her walk into the room, they were like, ‘Oh no, we have to debate Ashley. You know, she just got a reputation like that.

“I just decided to shoot each one and see if they land,” Ashley said.
PA

She also started a local organization, Our Story Our Worth, which provides mentorship to young girls of color.

Unsurprisingly, Ashley was student council president and also spoke at her high school’s graduation ceremony.

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Boris Johnson latest: Prime Minister’s Right to Buy housing plan slammed as ‘dangerous gimmick’ ahead of today’s speech https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/boris-johnson-latest-prime-ministers-right-to-buy-housing-plan-slammed-as-dangerous-gimmick-ahead-of-todays-speech/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 10:07:29 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/boris-johnson-latest-prime-ministers-right-to-buy-housing-plan-slammed-as-dangerous-gimmick-ahead-of-todays-speech/ Boris Johnson says vote of no confidence ‘decisive’ despite massive Tory rebellion The government’s right to buy plan has been slammed as “dangerous stuff”, a housing charity Shelter has warned. Group chief executive Polly Neate said: ‘The Prime Minister’s accommodation plans are confusing, unachievable and dangerous. Developing reckless plans to expand the right to buy […]]]>

Boris Johnson says vote of no confidence ‘decisive’ despite massive Tory rebellion

The government’s right to buy plan has been slammed as “dangerous stuff”, a housing charity Shelter has warned.

Group chief executive Polly Neate said: ‘The Prime Minister’s accommodation plans are confusing, unachievable and dangerous. Developing reckless plans to expand the right to buy will further endanger our rapidly shrinking supply of social housing.

She added that the government’s promise to replace sold social houses with the right to buy “has failed”.

“The government needs to stop wasting time on the failed policies of the past and start building more of the safe social housing that this country really needs.”

Boris Johnson is due to announce the policy in Blackpool today which will allow people to use their benefits to access the property ladder as part of a series of announcements aimed at easing the housing crisis.

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Government housing plan is ‘a dangerous gimmick’, says Shelter boss

Housing charities Shelter have also weighed in on the government’s new homeownership policy.

Polly Neate, chief executive of Shelter, said: ‘The Prime Minister’s housing plans are confusing, unachievable and dangerous. Developing reckless plans to expand the right to buy will further endanger our rapidly shrinking supply of social housing.

“For decades, the promise to replace every social housing unit sold through Right to Buy has failed. If these plans go ahead, we will remain stuck in the same destructive cycle of selling and destroying thousands more social housing units than are built each year.

“The math doesn’t add up: why try to sell the few truly affordable homes that are left – at great expense – when homelessness is on the rise and more than a million households are stuck on the waiting list . The government needs to stop wasting time on the failed policies of the past and start building more of the safe social housing that this country really needs.

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 11:00 a.m.

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Gove promises ‘instant’ social housing replacement

Upgrading Secretary Michael Gove said new social housing would be produced “instantly” to replace homes bought by low-income people under the government’s latest housing plans.

Asked on ITV’s Good Morning Britain how quickly new social housing would replace those purchased under the scheme, Mr Gove said: ‘Instantly’.

He added: “Overall, we want to be in a position where we increase social housing, increase the number of units available for ownership and ensure that in the social housing stock, as people move from renting to the property so that we also replace those numbers.”

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 10:42 am

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Lisa Nandy said Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer did not address the confidence motion during Prime Minister’s Questions (PMQ) on Wednesday because Boris Johnson “does well enough to sabotage himself”.

Asked if there should be a Labor leadership race, the shadow leveling secretary told Sky News: “No, absolutely not.

“Yesterday Keir Starmer was talking about the issues that matter to the people of the country.

“The Prime Minister is doing a pretty good job of sabotaging himself and his own reputation, and this feud will continue to play out within the Conservative Party.

“It is a tragedy for the country when we need a government that is focused on the issues that matter to most people – the rising cost of living, growing waiting lists for treatment of cancer – these are things that keep families up at night.

“And Keir is absolutely right to use our platform as the Official Opposition to raise these issues with the government and to set out plans that we would take to address them, in the hope that the government will address them now – but if they won’t we will fight for them in the next general election and put them into practice as a Labor government.

(PENNSYLVANIA)

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 10:33 am

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ICYMI: Priti Patel hasn’t met me once in 14 months and canceled meetings, says ‘frustrated’ border chief

The Government Borders Inspector has expressed ‘frustration’ that he has not been able to meet Home Secretary Priti Patel once since his appointment more than 14 months ago.

David Neal – appointed Independent Chief Borders and Immigration Inspector last March – told MPs he was “disappointed” that five or six meetings had been cancelled.

“I haven’t met the home secretary yet,” he told the home affairs select committee. “I’ve asked to speak to him several times, and pre-arranged meetings have been canceled maybe five or six times now.”

It comes as the Interior Ministry’s Rwanda deportation plan faces a legal challenge in emergency proceedings launched in the High Court on Wednesday after the government plans to send migrants to this East African country as early as next week.

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 10:18 a.m.

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Watch: Michael Gove says it was a ‘mistake’ to say Boris Johnson wouldn’t be a competent PM

Michael Gove says it was a ‘mistake’ to say Boris Johnson wouldn’t be a competent PM

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 10:02 a.m.

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NEW: The cost of filling an average car with petrol hits £100 for the first time

The average cost of a full tank of petrol for a typical 55-litre family car has topped £100 for the first time, according to figures from data firm Experian Catalist.

The record comes as households across the country grapple with the cost of living crisis caused by rising inflation, soaring energy bills and rising fuel costs.

Leveling Secretary Michael Gove warned on Thursday that suppliers feared they would not pass on fuel tax cuts to consumers.

Speaking on ITV’s Good Morning Britain, he said: ‘There are concerns that some retailers in some forecourts are not passing on this reduction.

“We know there is a government watchdog – the Competition and Markets Authority – which ensures that people behave in a way that is properly competitive, that they are not conspiring against the consumer.

It comes as Boris Johnson faces pressure to cut taxes to help families.

(PA wire)

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 9:47 a.m.

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There are “some concerns” that suppliers may not pass on the reduction in fuel taxes to consumers, Secretary Michael Gove said.

Speaking on ITV Hello Brittanyhe said: “There are concerns that some retailers on some forecourts are not passing on this reduction.

“We know there is a government watchdog – the Competition and Markets Authority – which ensures that people behave in a way that is properly competitive, that they are not conspiring against the consumer.

“So we are vigilant in this regard, and the Chancellor took action earlier this year because we want to make sure that at a very difficult time – energy and oil prices rise due to the war in Ukraine – let us do all we can help you.

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 9:37 a.m.

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Large sums of money will be needed for the homeownership scheme, admits Gove

Michael Gove admitted that large sums of money would be needed, the upgrading secretary said “we want to be able to have the resources to fund a program like this”.

The Minister for Leveling Up has put in place plans for the lowest paid workers to be able to use housing allowances to buy their homes, and an extension of the right to buy for tenants of housing associations.

According The temperaturethe government wants tenants to have the option of buying properties from housing associations at discounts of up to 70% – although this is likely to be limited to a pilot project and without additional government funding.

But Mr Gove rejected the figure – and admitted there would be a cap on the number of housing association tenants who will be able to benefit from the right to buy extension.

He confirmed that there were no new funds committed to the program, saying Sky News“It will come from the global plot, from the global envelope of public expenditure. We expect that we will cap the number of people who can benefit from it at first, and then it will increase over time. »

Asked about the reduction, Mr Gove replied AML“It will depend on how long you’ve been in the house. I don’t think we’ll be offering 70% discounts for the right to buy from our housing association… We’re not proposing to offer discounts on this scale .

Mr Gove has promised the government will commit to replacing council housing sold “as is” – but labor and housing charities have pointed to the huge cost of building new homes being sold at a cut price.

He also claimed on ITV Hello Brittany that social housing would be produced “instantly” to replace housing purchased by low-income people.

He added: ‘We want to be in a position where we are increasing social housing… and making sure that in the social housing stock people are moving from renting to owning so that we replace those numbers as well.’

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 9:22 a.m.

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Labour’s Lisa Nandy continues to weigh in on the government’s housing policy, saying it will make the housing crisis worse after saying the plans were unworkable.

She added that Labor would crack down on unfair rental charges.

The shadow leveling secretary told Sky News: ‘You could speed up action to crack down on unfair rental charges, that’s something we’re proposing today ahead of the housing debate that Michael Gove and I will have later in Parliament.

“We should take more steps to increase the supply of affordable housing.

“At the end of the day, this is the only way to really solve the housing crisis for most people.

“The measures the government is announcing today will not begin to do that for most people, and in fact some of them will make the housing supply crisis even worse.

“One of the positive things that Michael Gove has done is to make funds available to recommission brownfield sites which would open up land to allow properties to be built.”

(Getty Images)

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 9:05 a.m.

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Watch: Gove says government will crack down on companies that ‘unfairly take advantage’ of drivers

Gove says government will crack down on companies that ‘unfairly take advantage’ of drivers

Thomas KingleyJune 9, 2022 8:50 a.m.

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Data to drive the design and monitoring of social programs https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/data-to-drive-the-design-and-monitoring-of-social-programs/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 09:36:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/data-to-drive-the-design-and-monitoring-of-social-programs/ In a decisive move to merge digital reform and the use of data to design and evaluate programs, newly selected National Data Commissioner Gayle Milnes and her office have been brought into the Department of Finance. The Digital Transformation Agency was also moved from the Prime Minister’s Department, consolidating control of the $10 billion annual […]]]>

In a decisive move to merge digital reform and the use of data to design and evaluate programs, newly selected National Data Commissioner Gayle Milnes and her office have been brought into the Department of Finance. The Digital Transformation Agency was also moved from the Prime Minister’s Department, consolidating control of the $10 billion annual investment in digital transformation to the Department of Finance.

Legislation allowing data sharing between departments was passed the week before Parliament prorogued and will now be administered by Ms Milnes, under the wing of the Department of Finance.

Finance Minister Katy Gallagher has also been put in charge of the public sector and implementing the digital and data reforms identified in the Thodey review of the Australian civil service.

Finance also oversees program reporting and evaluation and consolidation should see a major increase in the use of data to better manage and focus programs on mitigating the causes of social disadvantage, rather than just the symptoms.

Early attention should focus on the national disability insurance scheme, where poor data collection masks the cause of the sharp rise in the number of people receiving support. It is also unclear what functional improvements are being generated while the program is not generating the expected employment benefits.

“The availability of data in unprecedented quantities – formal and informal, structured and unstructured, expert and experiential – combined with sophisticated analytical tools is already redefining the ‘conditions of engagement’ for social policy and the search for what works” , said a digital transformation expert. Martin Stewart Weeks.

Mr Stewart-Weeks runs a new venture, Australia Cares, with the University of Sydney’s Social Policy Lab. “Data, and its creative and intelligent use, will be the currency for renovating and reimagining the design and delivery of social policies and programs over the next 10 years. And this coincides with, and will help motivate, the deeper process of reform and renewal across the public sector itself.

But he cautioned against a purely data-driven approach. “Data encompasses the knowledge that comes from those who live with the experience of the conditions that social policy seeks to change,” he said.

“A narrow technocratic view of data and analytics as balm for human complexity has never worked. Social policy must be as much about people and places as well-calculated numbers,” Mr Stewart-Weeks said. .

Professor Davis is also a strong proponent of place-based approaches and identifying the real causes of disadvantage and early investment to reduce the human toll and overall fiscal cost to government. This approach requires the use of large integrated datasets to identify key patterns and drivers and a willingness from governments to invest in the costliest cohorts. Typically, 50% of social program clients generate 50% of budget costs.

Professor Davis’ appointment has been widely welcomed.

“I just think Glyn is a really exceptional leader,” said ANU Vice-Chancellor and Nobel Laureate Brian Schmidt. “I consider him probably the best university leader Australia has ever had, period. I don’t say that lightly. That’s my assessment, which has translated into outstanding leadership.

“He’s a unique person, he’s a unicorn. Someone who understands the theoretical basis of how government works, someone who has actually practiced it at the state level and has run an incredibly difficult organization for many years at the University of Melbourne.

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Natalia Kusendova defended mental health services and French language rights, but not the downtown SLR loop https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/natalia-kusendova-defended-mental-health-services-and-french-language-rights-but-not-the-downtown-slr-loop/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 18:34:01 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/natalia-kusendova-defended-mental-health-services-and-french-language-rights-but-not-the-downtown-slr-loop/ Natalia Kusendova has worn many hats over the past four years, that of a Mississauga Center representative, that of a registered nurse and that of someone who is fluent in French and who defends the rights of speakers of the language. The PC incumbent has served her term with issues she knows well, such as […]]]>

Natalia Kusendova has worn many hats over the past four years, that of a Mississauga Center representative, that of a registered nurse and that of someone who is fluent in French and who defends the rights of speakers of the language.

The PC incumbent has served her term with issues she knows well, such as mental health care, lack of hospital capacity, growing substance abuse issues and representation for the many diverse constituents she speaks for. In four years, Kusendova has risen to the House 412 times, mentioning her constituency 48 times. She spoke French 120 times and was the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Francophone Affairs.

She was a member of the Standing Committee on Social Policy (which she later chaired), the Standing Committee on Justice Policy, and served as Vice Chair of the Standing Committee on General Government after serving as a member there.

As the voice of Mississauga representatives, Kusendova has demonstrated a deep understanding of the issues plaguing her community. She stood up for the first time at Queen’s Park on July 18, 2018 to introduce herself.

Kusendova speaks English, French, Polish, Czech and Slovak and immigrated to Canada when she was young. Her constituency is dominated by residents of South Asian, Chinese and Arab descent, and throughout her four years she has championed diversity and the benefits of pluralism.

That summer, speaking of the fatal Danforth shooting in Toronto, she asked the attorney general what the government was doing to end violent crime.

On August 7, 2018, she stood up in support of Bill 4, the Cap and Trade Cancellation Act.

“During my campaign, I spoke with thousands of residents of Mississauga Center and the most common concern I heard from people is that life was harder under the Liberals; that prices had risen considerably, such as gasoline and electricity; that people had to choose between heating and eating; that thousands of manufacturing jobs had left Ontario,” Kusendova said inside Queen’s Park.

The issue of affordability is one that Kusendova repeatedly raised, but was not the main focus.

In late August 2018, she again addressed the House in French, this time asking how the government intends to protect children and Ontarians from legalized cannabis. She was particularly concerned with preventing legal users of marijuana from driving under the influence of drugs.

During her four years, Kusendova used French in much of her comments and questions in the House. She was appointed Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Francophone Affairs in November 2020.

In November 2018, Kusendova brought up the police, a common topic for her. She said residents of Mississauga Center feared officers were being investigated after administering naloxone to a person who later died. Kusendova wanted information about the Police Services Act and how it deals with such situations.

As a strong advocate for people with addictions and mental health issues, she then successfully introduced a bill that helps police respond to calls involving a drug overdose.

On November 28, 2018, Kusendova stood up to close the gap between French language funding in Ontario compared to New Brunswick and Manitoba. According to her, the province provides only $2.78 per person for services in French, but New Brunswick and Manitoba allocate respectively $7.31 and $35.71 per person.

“We ask the federal government to treat Franco-Ontarians on an equal footing,” said Kusendova.

A month later, when discussions around Bill 108, the More Homes, More Choice Act (2019) were discussed, Kusendova participated entirely in French.

“We will encourage the industry to challenge issues of affordability, size of rental units and type of housing,” she said in the spring of 2019.

On the same day, she stood up in support of Bill 107, the Getting Ontario Moving Act, 2019, which enforces more rules of the road, such as fines for passing a school bus with its sign on. ‘stop.

That same spring, Kusendova led the debate on her own bill, Bill 105, the Mandatory Police Training Act (2019). It requires that all police officers, special constables and First Nations constables be trained in the administration of naloxone to help deal with the overdose crisis.

“Mr. President, we know that knowledge is power. With Bill 105, we are empowering all police departments to be trained in the administration of naloxone and save lives,” she said. “Some 60% of opioid overdoses happen in the home, and the police are often the first to arrive on the scene, which is why it is absolutely essential that we move forward with this bill. The alternative is simply unacceptable.

Kusendova has repeatedly stood up at Queen’s Park to address the mental health issues of Ontarians and those in her riding. On November 26, 2019, she stood up in support of Bill 116, the Foundations for the Promotion and Protection of Mental Health and Addictions Services Act, 2019.

“The simple truth is that we cannot address the complex issue of mental health services without addressing addictions services, and vice versa,” said the MPP for Mississauga Center. “Ontarians need and deserve to have access to an integrated and connected system, one that understands that these complex problems require holistic solutions.

Natalia Kusendova (center) knocks on the door with her team.

(Twitter)

At the start of 2020, Kusendova again focused on Franco-Ontarian issues and began the early process of passing her second and final bill before the end of her term.

“Ontario’s Francophone community holds an important place in the past, present and future of our province,” said the MPP. “The contributions of Francophones here in Ontario culturally, economically and in our communities across the provinces are invaluable and historic, dating back 400 years.

Kusendova voted in favor of her PC government’s program, but was also keen to support other parties’ motions and bills that aligned with her core positions. In September 2020, Kusendova introduced Motion 87, a bill that recognizes the unique struggles of black communities with mental health. This was written by the Ontario NDP.

In March 2021, she focused on combating human trafficking and helping the government pass legislation to strengthen other laws. She stood to offer her thoughts and support for Bill 251, the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act (2021).

It amended various laws to focus on streamlining anti-trafficking efforts. It focuses on the government’s response and the province’s duty to engage stakeholders and protect residents from the growing crime of human trafficking. It also strengthens support for children’s aid societies and police forces to better protect young people from becoming victims. It ensures greater protection for survivors of human trafficking and takes into account the unique circumstances that Indigenous communities face.

She brought up Bill 251 again in late May 2021.

“Human trafficking poses a serious threat to the safety of our children; it’s as simple as that,” she said on May 31 last year. “So to suggest that this legislation, with such broad support from children’s aid societies, community human trafficking advocates, our law enforcement and survivors themselves, can be summed up as confusing sex work with human trafficking not only jeopardizes the safety of our children but also diminishes the horrors experienced by its survivors.

In November and December, she supported Bill 37, the Providing More Care, Protecting the Elderly and Building More Beds Act of 2021 and ended her four years by talking about long-term care. duration and the problems that afflict the elderly twice more before the elections.

While Kusendova has worked hard to defend health care, confront human trafficking, the elderly, growing diversity and French issues, the MPP for Mississauga Center did not mention the light transportation system on rail (LRT) of Hurontario during his tenure and did not address issues related to green spaces. and future planning in his constituency, issues that were raised by many constituents.

A desire to reinstall the SLR’s downtown loop in his constituency, which his party canceled, was ignored by the area’s MPP.

Before seeking re-election, a lawsuit against Kusendova was filed by Grant Gorchynski alleging she owes him $30,500 in unpaid loans.

According to Kusendova, the money was provided as a gift to help pay off her student loans and also for incidental expenses that arose throughout the relationship.

Evidence filed with the court contradicts her claim that she did not ask for the money. The evidence also clearly indicates that she should not have accepted it because she knew that the plaintiff was trying to influence her on the issue of a stop along the SLR line.

In an earlier statement to The Pointer, Kusendova said, “I’m looking forward to my day in court.”


E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @taasha__15


COVID-19 affects all Canadians. At a time when everyone needs vital public information, The Pointer has removed our paywall on all pandemic-related stories and those of public interest to ensure that every resident of Brampton and Mississauga has access to facts. For those who can, we encourage you to consider a subscription. This will help us report on important public issues that the community needs to know more than ever. You can sign up for a 30-day free trial HERE. Thereafter, The Pointer will charge $10 per month and you can cancel at any time directly on the website. Thanks

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New director of science, research and evidence will help lead the National Institute for Health and Care Research https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/new-director-of-science-research-and-evidence-will-help-lead-the-national-institute-for-health-and-care-research/ Mon, 30 May 2022 23:08:18 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/new-director-of-science-research-and-evidence-will-help-lead-the-national-institute-for-health-and-care-research/ She has extensive experience and interest in the inclusion of vulnerable and marginalized people in research NIHR will continue to support research to improve the nation’s health and wealth Dr Gail Marzetti has been appointed as the new Director of Science, Research and Evidence (SRE) at the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC). She […]]]>
  • She has extensive experience and interest in the inclusion of vulnerable and marginalized people in research
  • NIHR will continue to support research to improve the nation’s health and wealth

Dr Gail Marzetti has been appointed as the new Director of Science, Research and Evidence (SRE) at the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC). She will take over the role previously held by Dr. Louise Wood.

Helping to lead the NIHR and shape research in the areas of health and social care, Dr. Gail Marzetti will work under the direction of Professor Lucy Chappell, Chief Scientific Advisor to DHSC and Chief Executive Officer of NIHR. She brings with her a wealth of relevant experience with a background in research funding and a track record in including vulnerable and marginalized people.

NIHR aims to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Their research helps discover new treatments, improve diagnostics, advance medical technologies and strengthen health and care services.

Health research has been fundamental to fighting Covid and the NIHR was an integral part of that. They co-funded and supported the research behind the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine as well as dexamethasone, the first effective treatment for Covid.

Over the past 10 years, NIHR researchers have reported more than 6,500 cases where their research has influenced health and care policy or impacted practice and guidelines.

Innovation Minister Lord Kamall said:

Health and care research is key to transforming our health service and ensuring the NHS is able to deliver world-class care.

He has been vital in our fight against Covid and in saving thousands of lives – whether through the rapid creation of vaccines or the identification of life-saving treatments like dexamethasone.

I would like to thank and pay tribute to Dr. Louise Wood for her incredible work and leadership. I know Dr Gail Marzetti will build on Dr Woods’ contribution, working alongside Professor Lucy Chappell to ensure the UK remains a world leader in diverse and groundbreaking research.

Professor Lucy Chappell, Director General of the NIHR and Chief Science Advisor to the DHSC, said:

This is an exciting new chapter for the NIHR.

Louise will be sorely missed, but I am confident that Dr. Marzetti brings with her a wealth of experience with a background in research funding and an interest in underserved communities. She will be well-positioned to help achieve the strategic goals of the NIHR, focusing on improving care and outcomes for patients and the public, and addressing inequities in health and care.

Dr. Gail Marzetti, new director of science, research and evidence, said: > I am delighted to join the leadership of the NIHR and to work again in the field of research and evidence. > > Many of the NIHR’s strategic priorities relate to inclusion and health inequities, topics close to my heart, and I am delighted to bring my experience to both the NIHR’s national work and its work in low- and middle-income countries. > > I look forward to collaborating with colleagues in health and care research to help the NIHR fulfill its vital mission.

Dr. Marzetti is a senior civil servant with 25 years of experience in various policy areas. She joined DHSC in March 2020 and is currently Director of Refugees and Head of International Workforce. Prior to that, she worked for the Department for International Development (DfID) for over 20 years. This included six years on the team that created DfID’s Research and Evidence Division, putting evidence at the heart of policies and programmes. Most recently, she was head of DfID Myanmar, leading the UK response to the Rohingya crisis, and before that, head of DfID Nepal.

Dr Louise Wood has been with DHSC since 2005 and has been instrumental alongside Dame Sally Davies and Sir Chris Whitty. Louise has co-led the organization with great integrity and passion, having watched it grow since its inception.

Dr. Louise Wood is leaving DHSC in June 2022 and Dr. Gail Marzetti will take over in July.

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Youth unemployment in Mississauga—Malton a key issue for backbencher Deepak Anand https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/youth-unemployment-in-mississauga-malton-a-key-issue-for-backbencher-deepak-anand/ Sat, 28 May 2022 16:30:57 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/youth-unemployment-in-mississauga-malton-a-key-issue-for-backbencher-deepak-anand/ As a first-time politician, Deepak Anand struck a balance between standing up for his Malton constituents and staying true to his PC party’s platform, even when the two considerations clashed with each other. As an MLA, he stood inside Queen’s Park to speak a total of 327 times, 73 of which mentioned his unique constituency. […]]]>

As a first-time politician, Deepak Anand struck a balance between standing up for his Malton constituents and staying true to his PC party’s platform, even when the two considerations clashed with each other.

As an MLA, he stood inside Queen’s Park to speak a total of 327 times, 73 of which mentioned his unique constituency. The vast majority of Mississauga—Malton residents live just north of Pearson International Airport, which not only creates a physical barrier between the community and the rest of Mississauga, but often cuts Malton off from the rest of the city socially and politically. The riding has become a vibrant and diverse region, but its isolation poses unique challenges.

Anand is seeking re-election on June 2 and the PC candidate, who has not offered voters an individual platform to set his priorities for Malton, will instead have to be judged by voters on the basis of his four years of experience .

Bill 231, the Protecting Ontarians by Improving Gas Station Safety to Prevent Gas and Dash Act, 2020, is one piece of legislation Anand is working on. It has yet to be passed by the Social Policy Standing Committee, but could become law soon after the start of the next legislative session after the June election.

When the House was dissolved, Anand was Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Labour, Training and Skills Development, an area of ​​governance he linked closely to the constituency on several occasions. He has served as a member of the Standing Committee on Government Agencies, Chair of the Standing Committee on Social Policy (after serving as Vice-Chair and Member), and Chair of the Standing Committee on Regulations and Private Bills.

His first major speech in the Legislative Assembly came on July 25, 2018 when he spoke about youth unemployment, an issue plaguing many of his constituents.

“In my riding of Mississauga—Malton, the youth unemployment rate is about 25%, and 28% of young people in Malton feel left out and don’t participate in extracurricular activities. Both of these numbers are above the city average,” Anand said.

Very early on, he mentioned these statistics to illustrate the impact of unemployment on his constituency. After high-profile incidents in Malton involving gang-related activity and other daily examples of violent crime involving young people, Anand expressed concern about the plight facing many young people in his constituency; Mississauga—Malton has the largest non-adult population in Mississauga, a statistic he often mentioned inside Queen’s Park.

Anand has focused his efforts on connecting young people with further training and employment opportunities, particularly for the skilled trades which employ a large portion of residents in the constituency.

“I am making this motion to solve this problem in my constituency, and I hope we can solve the problem in the rest of the constituencies as well. This motion aims to address the miscommunication between young people and employment opportunities,” he said at Queen’s Park on August 9, 2018. “There is huge potential to reduce the youth unemployment rate by connecting simply young people to current community employment resources. I’m here to ask, let’s close that gap.

Unlike many of his PC colleagues, Anand broke ranks a few times when he boldly called on his own party to do more for his constituents.

“To be honest, the main flaw of youth unemployment is kind of with us,” he said.

Anand has two children and has drawn on his experience as a father to address the need for better educational pathways to address youth unemployment.

He spoke inside the legislature about science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM)-based opportunities and prioritized commitments by local Mississauga—Malton businesses to enable lifelong learning of employees.

He also advocated for Bill 68, Ontario’s Comprehensive Policing Act (2019). The bill has impacted the public’s ability to hold policing oversight bodies accountable and has drawn criticism from many members of black communities in Ontario who have suffered from policing and disproportionate targeting through carding and use of force (Peel statistics show that police use both practices on black residents at about three times the rate compared to the general population). Anand expressed concern on behalf of his constituents, but ultimately backed the controversial bill, a common tactic of his, which saw the MLA’s first term generally toeing party lines, even when he did not serve the residents of Malton well.

“Mr. Speaker, trust and confidence are the two important characteristics of effective policing policy, and the people of Ontario must have confidence in the police to keep our communities safe,” he said. he said, but he did next to nothing to ensure that the “trust and confidence” of the community would inform the results of the legislation.

Anand also spoke about Interim Place and the local organization’s efforts to protect women and girls from violence. It was a common concern for many in his constituency, but, again, he failed to connect words with deeds.

Anand mentioned events, organizations and businesses in his riding, such as SodaStream and its investment in a local manufacturing plant that created 28 jobs for residents of Mississauga—Malton.

Deepak Anand is seeking re-election on June 2 with the Progressive Conservatives. Anand’s biggest competitor is the Ontario New Democratic Party candidate.

(Twitter)

In March 2019, he stood up in support of Bill 48, the Safe and Supported Classrooms Act (2019), which further protected students from abuse at school. The bill requires educators guilty of any act of sexual assault to relinquish their teaching certificates and diplomas.

Anand has often spoken out about violence against women and youth violence, advocating for safer communities, but when one of the worst mass shootings happened in his own constituency in September 2019, he didn’t. not said a word inside the legislature. He remained silent on the need for gun control and offered no solution to address community concerns about the complete lack of police presence in Malton, following the recent closure of a community station. The incident left an innocent 17-year-old bystander, Johnathan Davis, dead and five others injured as more than 130 bullets were fired in broad daylight into the grounds of an apartment complex in Malton, in this which was deemed a youth gang incident.

Davis’ horrific murder in the community left residents in shock.

It wasn’t until February 18, 2020, five months after the mass shooting, that the MPP for Mississauga—Malton publicly acknowledged the incident at Queen’s Park. In a brief statement, he asked Solicitor General Sylvia Jones what the province was doing to address gang and gun violence.

In the fall of 2019, Anand rose to speak about the continuing issues of systemic anti-Black racism and discrimination within the Peel District School Board.

“When I hear about allegations of racism against a community, just the thought that someone has been the victim of racism really discourages and discourages me,” he said on November 28 of the same year. . “Recent concerns raised by the community regarding allegations of anti-Black racism on the board and lack of buy-in in governance, leadership and human resources are very concerning.”

Anand supported then-Education Minister Stephen Lecce’s “swift” action to appoint two independent reviewers to review the board (Lecce ultimately oversaw the appointment of a supervisor to take over governance of the board). PDSB, and the head of education on the board was immediately fired).

When COVID-19 arrived in Ontario, the riding of Anand was the hardest hit area in Mississauga. Infection rates have increased and devastated small businesses and manufacturing companies. He backed legislation early on to expand the government’s use of the state of emergency, continuing to keep drastic pandemic measures in place, but later when the need for more sickness paid was raised, Anand turned his back on the workers and residents he had claimed. support, stick to the CP’s assertion that the government was doing enough.

He acknowledged his constituency was in dire straits with rising case rates because people couldn’t get paid time off and were choosing between a job over having no food or rent.

“I have spoken to countless workers and residents who were so grateful for this program and for the government’s support,” he said Nov. 23, 2021. “I’m sure they haven’t forgotten that, and they wouldn’t have had it without that program,” he said, referring to supports that were largely federally funded, refusing to demand more paid sick days.

The three-day paid sick leave that Ontario eventually implemented was criticized by worker advocates who said it wasn’t even enough time to rid the body of the virus. Anand argued twice during the term for the minimum paid sick leave, instead of the 10 days workers were asking for, saying essential workers would benefit from the PC policy, which was only passed after more a year of overwhelming impacts of the pandemic on essential workers and their families.


E-mail: [email protected]

Twitter: @taasha__15


COVID-19 affects all Canadians. At a time when everyone needs vital public information, The Pointer has removed our paywall on all pandemic-related stories and those of public interest to ensure that every resident of Brampton and Mississauga has access to facts. For those who can, we encourage you to consider a subscription. This will help us report on important public issues that the community needs to know more than ever. You can sign up for a 30-day free trial HERE. Thereafter, The Pointer will charge $10 per month and you can cancel at any time directly on the website. Thanks

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