Social behaviour – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:34:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png Social behaviour – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Two teenagers found guilty of Howth Junction incident where girl kicked under Dart https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/two-teenagers-found-guilty-of-howth-junction-incident-where-girl-kicked-under-dart/ Tue, 17 May 2022 17:34:29 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/two-teenagers-found-guilty-of-howth-junction-incident-where-girl-kicked-under-dart/ Two Dublin youngsters have been found guilty of an ‘intimidating’ violent disorder incident which saw a teenage girl being knocked head-first under a Dart train. CTV footage has emerged of a 17-year-old girl at Howth Junction station falling between the platform and a stationary train on April 1 last year. She was helped by her […]]]>

Two Dublin youngsters have been found guilty of an ‘intimidating’ violent disorder incident which saw a teenage girl being knocked head-first under a Dart train.

CTV footage has emerged of a 17-year-old girl at Howth Junction station falling between the platform and a stationary train on April 1 last year. She was helped by her friends and staff.

Investigating Gardai obtained directives from the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) and charged three 17-year-olds with violent disorder. One had an additional charge of assault causing harm to the girl; his case was severed and returned to the Circuit Court for trial.

Judge Paul Kelly found the other two boys had peripheral roles and he accepted jurisdiction to keep their cases in Dublin Children’s Court.

They pleaded not guilty and the case went to a full hearing.

The prosecution had video footage from the station’s CCTV system, a security guard’s body camera and evidence from a second teenage girl who interacted with the group.

The court heard that Gardai identified the couple using confidential public information.

Judge Kelly was told that security guards removed a group of around 10 young people from a train due to complaints of anti-social behaviour. However, they were still on the platform when some girls came and tried to catch the train.

One of the 17-year-old boys swung his foot at a girl from her bike, making contact with her head.

In evidence, she described him as “intimidating”, and she said, “one of them lunged at me”.

It happened shortly before a related incident in which a second teenage girl was knocked head-first off the platform under the stationary train.

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Howth Junction DART Station

An OCS security officer alerted the train driver and brought this girl back to the platform.

Defense attorney Michael Byrne sought dismissal on the grounds of a lack of evidence that they used or threatened to use violence that would cause a person to fear for their safety or the safety of others.

However, state attorney Mairead White argued there was evidence to support the charge, which established that the youths acted together and that it was a “joint enterprise.” “.

Judge Kelly found there was a clear threat of violence. Additionally, he said the footage showed sudden movements, an attempt to “body check”, several members of the group gesturing and one of the boys made physical contact with the witness as she attempted to get to the train.

He noted testimony from a security guard that the group was “intimidating people”.

Video evidence showed them hurriedly fleeing the station.

The court heard Gardai searched the homes of the two boys and recovered clothes.

Garda Kevin O’Boyle said the incident attracted media attention. As a result, “a lot of information has come to the confidential Garda information line” from people who are “reluctant to make statements”.

One of the boys interviewed by Gardai identified himself in the video evidence holding an electric bicycle. When Gardai asked him why he left after the girl fell off the platform, he replied, “I felt bad for not helping her; I was in shock.”

“In situations like this, you just walk away. You don’t get involved,” he added.

Neither of the two youths testified during the hearing. They cannot be named because they are minors.

Judge Kelly noted that they had no previous criminal convictions and he adjourned their sentencing for the preparation of probation reports. The case resumes in June.

The boys, accompanied to the hearing by family members, were ordered to abide by the conditions of their release on bail.

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Nigerian arrested in K’taka for unruly behavior https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/nigerian-arrested-in-ktaka-for-unruly-behavior/ Mon, 16 May 2022 05:22:02 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/nigerian-arrested-in-ktaka-for-unruly-behavior/ Residence ” General ” Crime ” Nigerian arrested in K’taka for unruly behavior Posted By: Gopi May 16, 2022 Bangalore, May 16 (SocialNews.XYZ) Karnataka Police have arrested a Nigerian national, who was wandering in a semi-undressed state here, police said on Monday. The person arrested has been identified as James (33), a resident of Hennur […]]]>

Bangalore, May 16 (SocialNews.XYZ) Karnataka Police have arrested a Nigerian national, who was wandering in a semi-undressed state here, police said on Monday.

The person arrested has been identified as James (33), a resident of Hennur Cross in Bangalore. Sampigehalli Police arrested him and carried out further investigation.


According to the police, the accused was found wandering near Shivaram Karanth Layout park in an almost undressed state, which embarrassed women, children and people.

Angered by the stranger’s behavior, residents called the police. When Sampigehalli Police arrived at the scene and inquired about him, he assaulted the officers.

Later, the police took him into custody and admitted him to the hospital because he had wounds on his body. Constable Srinivasmurthy filed a complaint against him.

Police said the accused appeared to have mental issues and was not cooperating with the investigation.

Source: IANS

Nigerian arrested in K'taka for unruly behavior

About Gopi

Gopi Adusumilli is a programmer. He is editor of SocialNews.XYZ and president of AGK Fire Inc.

He enjoys designing websites, developing mobile apps and publishing news articles from various authenticated news sources.

As for writing, he enjoys writing about current world politics and Indian movies. His future plans include developing SocialNews.XYZ into a news website that has no bias or judgment towards any.

He can be reached at gopi@socialnews.xyz

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Eviction from public housing leaves mother and son homeless in ‘heartless’ trend in Northern Territories https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/eviction-from-public-housing-leaves-mother-and-son-homeless-in-heartless-trend-in-northern-territories/ Fri, 13 May 2022 21:35:11 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/eviction-from-public-housing-leaves-mother-and-son-homeless-in-heartless-trend-in-northern-territories/ In the dark of night, on a damp March evening, Cherylene Campbell opened the rickety front door of her dream home to security guards and received a callback. Key points: A mother of two teenagers was given two weeks to vacate public accommodation following allegations of anti-social behavior Tenants usually receive at least 60 days […]]]>

In the dark of night, on a damp March evening, Cherylene Campbell opened the rickety front door of her dream home to security guards and received a callback.

She was due in Housing Court the next morning to defend herself against numerous allegations of anti-social behavior.

Within minutes, Ms Campbell and her then 14-year-old son had two weeks to leave and find a new home in a pocket of Australia where people remain on a waiting list for public accommodation until a decade.

“We tried to get a place in Darwin, so Taylen could stay in school. We tried all the hostels but they were all full. Then, at the last minute, we took what we could and went. went to Katherine,” Ms Campbell said.

“We just took clothes, my phone and my chair. That’s all we could take.

The Northern Territory government did not respond to questions from the ABC about the whereabouts of Ms Campbell’s assets.

Ten years of waiting for home

Behind a high chain-link fence in a northern suburb of Darwin, the yellow walls of the dilapidated government-owned house were beginning to peel. But for Ms. Campbell and her two teenage sons, the house was a dream come true.

They had waited 10 years for the disabled-accessible three-bedroom house, moving between crisis accommodation centers, public houses and hostels.

“We finally felt like we could get our lives back on track. We wouldn’t be homeless, but I think I bewitched myself.”

Over the course of a tumultuous few months – from September 2021 to March 2022 – while residing in the home, Ms Campbell said she lost both her sister and her unborn baby, suffered a miscarriage diaper at six months.

She said she was in the middle of an argument with her ex-partner and was still getting used to using a wheelchair after her leg was amputated.

To make matters worse, a neighbor was filing a series of complaints with the NT Government’s Families and Housing Department and the police showed up on her doorstep.

Cherylene Campbell and Taylen, 15, worry about sleeping rough if they don’t find affordable housing soon.(ABC KatherineRoxanne Fitzgerald)

“She complained about late night TV, or boys playing video games… she said I brought a lot of attention to my house, she complained about my visitors, my family and my friends. friends who came to help me clean the house or fix the garden because I can’t,” she said.

“We couldn’t even barbecue without her complaining.

‘Heartless and compassionate’ evictions on the rise

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Rowdy Innisfail youngsters caught after wild park ride https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/rowdy-innisfail-youngsters-caught-after-wild-park-ride/ Wed, 11 May 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/rowdy-innisfail-youngsters-caught-after-wild-park-ride/ An SUV is said to have driven on the grass of Innisfail Centennial Park next to the parking lot while other young people rode on running boards INNISFAIL – Cameras at Centennial Park identified an SUV driver who was driving cheekily across the grass and then into the parking lot with cheering friends riding on […]]]>

An SUV is said to have driven on the grass of Innisfail Centennial Park next to the parking lot while other young people rode on running boards

INNISFAIL – Cameras at Centennial Park identified an SUV driver who was driving cheekily across the grass and then into the parking lot with cheering friends riding on the running boards of the vehicle.

The April 26 incident is the latest of several concerning incidents of antisocial behavior that have been observed and reported at Centennial Park since last February.

On May 3, Gary Leith, director of the city’s fire and protection services, said one individual from a group of six youths involved in the ride had been identified and “appropriate action” had been taken. .

“Through an investigation we were able to identify the registered owner and driver and potentially charge (the driver). I cannot discuss whether any charges have been laid until they are in court,” Leith said, adding that the six people involved in the walk in the park are young offenders and the case is closed. dealt with by peace officers from his department. “It’s currently under investigation. Our law enforcement officers can enforce the provincial highway safety law.

the Albertan obtained video of the incident, but does not post it or screenshots, as all participating defendants are believed to be minors and their identities are protected by the Youth Criminal Justice Act of the federal government.

Leith said his department considers Centennial Park a “high priority area” for local law enforcement.

“It’s been several years,” he said, adding that there are several types of enforcement actions underway, including bike patrols, as well as speed and traffic checks.

“We have installed cameras in this area and those cameras, certainly in this case and in other cases, have led to the identification of individuals who are doing no good and led to enforcement action against them. “, did he declare. “They provide a useful tool, so if citizens see activity taking place there that they believe violates our regulations or provincial laws, they can call us and let us know that activity is taking place.”

Regarding future enforcement and monitoring at Centennial Park, Leith said the city will use a multidisciplinary approach.

“Obviously we will continue to develop these plans in conjunction with law enforcement, the community, the council and the police committee on how we can make improvements to the events that we occasionally see,” said Leith, adding that there is no problem with “99%”. of all community interactions in the park. “But obviously there are times when they’re not good and this is an example of that, and it’s been dealt with effectively.”

In 2019, the city council gave the go-ahead for the administration to spend $8,000 on video security cameras to monitor any potential antisocial behavior. The board and administration have grappled with the issue of park safety since a delegation presentation more than a year earlier offered solutions to curb anti-social behavior, including litter issues.

Com. Jason Heistad has been demanding action to have the park policed ​​and put in place better behavior controls since making an impassioned appeal to the council on February 14.

“I’m passionate because it’s our (advisory) job. When we get complaints or it’s been going on for a while, and it’s just not in the last two months. It’s been going on for a few years,” Heistad said on May 5.

Heistad told the Albertan “Many” citizens told him that it was time to have a discussion about the problems and the solutions needed for the park.

“And making sure it’s a safe place for everyone to come and go to the dog park and walk around Lake Napoleon,” said Heistad, who walks to Centennial Park every morning. “We have to work with our regulations (department) and our local RCMP detachment to make sure it’s a safe place. And littering, loitering and being abusive to people who can tell young people to slow down because they’re speeding and being reckless there is not tolerated. Period.”

Heistad said one action the council can take is to increase the fines for littering in the new updated Community Standards Bylaw, which could be approved by the council this week. He also wants increased signage at the park, as well as at Dodd’s Lake.

The proposed updated Community Standards rule calls for a fine of $150 for a first offense of littering, with a hit of $250 for a second offense within the year. The third and subsequent offenses in the year go up to $500.

“We need to have a structure in place for residents and visitors who come to our city and use these wide open spaces,” Heistad said. “If you communicate effectively with our community, through our police committee and our bylaws, people will be happy to go to the park and feel safe.

“Frankly, I am fed up, disappointed with individuals who do not treat the region in a respectful manner.”

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Resident ‘delighted’ after nightmarish neighbor clears away and she can finally sleep at night https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/resident-delighted-after-nightmarish-neighbor-clears-away-and-she-can-finally-sleep-at-night/ Tue, 10 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/resident-delighted-after-nightmarish-neighbor-clears-away-and-she-can-finally-sleep-at-night/ A resident who lived on the same street as a nightmarish neighbor said she could finally sleep at night now that they had been kicked out. Last week, a tenant was forced out of her home in Boswell Street, central Middlesbrough, after the house closed for the second time. Between April 4 and April 27, […]]]>

A resident who lived on the same street as a nightmarish neighbor said she could finally sleep at night now that they had been kicked out.

Last week, a tenant was forced out of her home in Boswell Street, central Middlesbrough, after the house closed for the second time. Between April 4 and April 27, a court heard there were 59 reports of drug dealing and antisocial behavior linked to the address.

Neighbors on the street complained of queues of people waiting for drugs, foul language, street fights and loud music at late night parties. A local resident, who wishes to remain anonymous, previously said she felt like a prisoner in her own home.

Read more: Eerie glimpse inside abandoned Middlesbrough SLAM nightclub where time stood still

When asked how she felt now that the tenant had been moved, she said: ‘I was delighted she was moved, although I would have preferred to see her named and shamed because she was really a nightmare to live on the street. “However, she added that she expected the neighbor to go and repeat the same behavior elsewhere.

The tenant, who had already moved out in December but returned once the closing order was lifted, has previously threatened to ‘f**king terrorize’ anyone who mentions her and at one point refused to leave the property. However, being granted a closure order left him with no choice but to pack his bags and move on.

The landlord has also applied for a possession order which allows them to terminate the tenancy, which means she cannot return. The resident said the street has returned to a more peaceful state since she left.

She added: “The street is now completely calm, 24 hours after it was moved away, there were no more homeless people or drug addicts coming to buy on the street and we can now have family visits. It’s also nice not having to worry about leaving the house and being able to sleep at night.

“I was happy that the council’s anti-social team and the mayor helped out.”

However, she criticized local councilors saying there had been a lack of communication from them and she had not seen them on the street.

In response, Central Ward Labor councilors Matt Storey, Zafar Uddin and Linda Lewis issued the following statement: “We have been contacted by a particular resident about this property as being an issue. We worked with the police, anti-social teams and community safety officers for some time to get action taken and we kept the affected resident informed throughout the process.

“We are happy that the local populations no longer have to worry about this scourge for their community. We are regularly on the move in service and are always available for residents to contact us by phone, email or Facebook @centralmatters whenever they need us.

Mayor Andy Preston and Cleveland police both welcomed the home’s closure. Mr Preston said: ‘I am really delighted this step has been taken and I hope the good people of Boswell Street can get back to normal life without having to live on constant nerves because of what was going on in this home.

“I would like to commend the council staff, police and neighbors who have all helped settle this second order. It’s infuriating that the wife was able to move in again, but hopefully this latest order means everything is settled for good.

Chief Inspector Darren Birkett of the Middlesbrough Borough Police Team, said anyone suffering from anti-social behavior or crime should contact the force on 101. He added: ‘We will always seek to act as far as possible. of the possible where people make the lives of others a misery. At this address, we have twice obtained closure orders and would like to thank the local community for their help and support in providing information.”

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Britain’s street of horrors avoided by taxi drivers where ‘someone’s leg was cut off’ https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/britains-street-of-horrors-avoided-by-taxi-drivers-where-someones-leg-was-cut-off/ Sun, 08 May 2022 10:58:15 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/britains-street-of-horrors-avoided-by-taxi-drivers-where-someones-leg-was-cut-off/ Young people used to throw rocks at delivery drivers and passing cars in Manchester’s Cicero Street, with one person even having their leg cut off in the area. Video loading Video unavailable The video will start automatically soon8Cancel play now Manchester: Just Eat Delivery driver attacked for his phone Trouble is returning to a ‘lawless’ […]]]>

Young people used to throw rocks at delivery drivers and passing cars in Manchester’s Cicero Street, with one person even having their leg cut off in the area.

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Manchester: Just Eat Delivery driver attacked for his phone

Trouble is returning to a ‘lawless’ British street that taxi drivers were once too scared to visit, a resident has claimed.

The gangs used to ‘riot’ in Manchester’s Cicero Street, with youths throwing rocks at passing delivery drivers and cars.

Shocking footage from a Just Eat rider’s helmet camera showed the moment a group of youngsters snatched his bike and his phone.

Someone even had their leg cut off in the neighborhood, a resident told the Manchester Evening News.

Although some locals insist behavior has improved in recent years, resident Doris Isoken, 48, says she still feels unsafe.

She added: “I’m scared. Kids gather, they almost broke my car window. They wouldn’t let me pass, they blocked the road and when I tried to pass they said no.







Cicero Street was once a hotbed of crime and the problems are apparently starting again
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“They poured cash on my car, I had to lock the doors. They always put their bikes on the road. It happened last month. It’s not good for the other kids, they might learn lessons from.

“Before they stopped and now it’s coming back. The problems were really big and now it’s coming back.”

Anti-social behavior was rampant on Cicero Street in 2018 when a takeaway delivery man was assaulted in broad daylight. The shocking incident was captured on the worker’s helmet video camera.

The victim could be heard screaming for help as the youths punched and kicked him from behind before stealing his phone and bike. The vicious attack was just part of a wave of violence and vandalism that plagued the area at the time.







Trainers hanging from a telephone line in Cicero Street
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A current resident, who did not wish to be named, says there is still a high level of crime and anti-social behavior on the street.

“Someone had their leg cut off here a few years ago,” says the 18-year-old. “Two days ago a kid was fighting with a grown woman, they were on the hood of a car.

“It’s pretty quiet now; it’s not nearly as bad as before. Before, it was crazy. I lived here for about six years. Obviously the neighborhood sucks, but that’s what it is.

Hashmat Mohmmadzai, owner of corner store Zak’s Local on Cicero Street, only took over the store six months ago. He says the business has changed hands several times in a short time due to issues with the region.

“There are problems all the time, like people breaking into cars at night. It happens a lot – and people breaking into houses. They are mostly children and teenagers,” a- he told the Manchester Evening News.







A boarded up pub in a nearby street in Moston, Manchester
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“We don’t really have any problems in the store, I’m trying to keep it under control.

“I’ve been here for six months and a lot of shop owners have changed in a short time because of trouble – kids stealing things and annoying them. Threatening them financially or personally.

“I don’t let them go over their limit. It stresses me out – it’s very stressful. There are things happening outside the store and I’m afraid of being held responsible for them. They’re buying something from here , then go out and create problems.”

Resident Aaron, 29, moved to Cicero Street in August 2019. He felt anxious about moving to the area after reading stories online, but has had no issues since arriving in the street.







Moston Lane still experiences high levels of crime
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“I know the previous year was bad,” he added. “After we moved here I had no problems, I got to know a few people on this road. There are families and a few elderly people.

“All the people who were terrorizing the streets have either moved out or been pushed aside. Nobody seems to be causing any trouble here anymore. I’m happy because I have kids.”

Taxi drivers previously told the Manchester Evening News they fear parts of north Manchester have become “lawless”, naming Cicero Street as one of four roads in Moston which are “particularly bad”.

Some drivers had rocks thrown at their cars and doors kicked in. Other weary shopkeepers believed the behavior scared off customers and forced employees to quit their jobs.

But resident Brian Haughton, who has lived on Cicero Street for more than 14 years, says the neighborhood is now a “friendly” place to live. “It’s quiet here now because they’re all done for this,” the 65-year-old added.

“It’s good. I’ve lived here for 14 years and I haven’t had any problems. You have a child here after school, but it’s a friendly place, I know a lot of people.







Vandals sprayed ‘420’ on a wall in Cicero Street
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Another resident, who did not wish to give his name, also believes that life on the streets has changed radically.

“Since September of last year, that has changed,” he says.

“This area used to be very dangerous. It’s very quiet, as you can see for yourself.”

But on nearby Moston Lane, some shop owners and staff still experience high crime rates today.

A worker, who did not wish to give his name, told the MEN: “I was stabbed around the corner from my house a few years ago and a few weeks ago there was a car chase just across the road.

“We were supposed to have a sign on the door saying no knives, we shouldn’t have to but we do and that’s the sad truth.”

Alex Rostas, who owns a convenience store, says he is afraid to leave his home for fear of being assaulted. “We don’t have CCTV cameras and a lot of people come and damage the cars.

“They come here and steal stuff,” the 41-year-old added.

“You are afraid to go out in case someone hits you.”

Councilor Pat Karney, cllr of Harpurhey in the City of Manchester, believes Cicero Street and surrounding areas could benefit from a residents’ association.

He told the Manchester Evening News: “There are still very big problems but the area has a strong sense of community. We believe that a local residents’ association would be a real asset. We’ll see if we can create one. »

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“A policeman, a mental health nurse…” Principal says wishlist would help solve problems at his school https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-policeman-a-mental-health-nurse-principal-says-wishlist-would-help-solve-problems-at-his-school/ Fri, 06 May 2022 06:30:27 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/a-policeman-a-mental-health-nurse-principal-says-wishlist-would-help-solve-problems-at-his-school/ A principal has shared his wish list of solutions to the huge problems facing schools after the pandemic. Martin Hulland, head of Cardiff West Community High School, said schools needed support to help education and children recover from Covid disruption. The social, mental health and economic problems caused by Covid and the closures are spreading […]]]>

A principal has shared his wish list of solutions to the huge problems facing schools after the pandemic. Martin Hulland, head of Cardiff West Community High School, said schools needed support to help education and children recover from Covid disruption.

The social, mental health and economic problems caused by Covid and the closures are spreading through schools and risk damaging the future chances of young people, he warned. The effect of high student absenteeism, increased mental health issues, deprivation and anti-social behavior has been described by school leaders since the first lockdown in 2020.

Mr Hulland’s school catchment area includes some of the most deprived areas of Wales. Communities like hers have been hit harder than others during the pandemic and in lockdown, her staff have delivered food and work to children’s doorsteps. Here’s what school leaders are saying about the effects of the pandemic

Mr Hulland said urgent action was needed to get children back to school and support them. he said he supported the Welsh Government’s announcement this week that fines should be reimposed on parents and guardians who fail to send their children to school. But he fears it will take years to bring attendance back across Wales to pre-pandemic levels and is worried about what this means for the future and the life chances of children and young people.

Children eligible for free school meals across Wales are now more than seven percentage points more likely to miss school than their better-off peers. Attendance at Cardiff West Community High, where two out of three pupils are entitled to free school meals, is hovering around 80 per cent, Mr Hulland said. That’s well below the 91% before the pandemic and 10% below the national average now – although in line with similar schools. Like most schools and most of society, Cardiff West Community High is also facing growing mental health issues, some of them very serious.

Mr Hulland points out that all schools face similar issues to varying degrees and said they need professional, on-site help to deal with some of these issues. Mental health issues in children served by its staff include suicidal thoughts, self-harm, school phobia and isolation.

The Headmaster’s Wish List

If money weren’t an issue, Mr. Hulland would like his school to have:

  • A mental health nurse on site
  • A social worker on site
  • A policeman on the spot
  • More family engagement staff
  • He said having these professionals in the school to work directly with children and their families and liaise with other services such as the Child and Adult Mental Health Service (CAMHS) would help. Although teachers do more than teach, they are not trained mental health or social work professionals.

Mr Hulland believes services like this in schools would help education resume in the event of a pandemic, address[pupilabsenceandsocialandhealthproblemsmadeworsebylockdownsandCovid[pupilabsenceandsocialandhealthproblemsmadeworsebylockdownsandCovid[l’absenced’élèvesetlesproblèmessociauxetdesantéaggravésparlesfermeturesetCovid[pupilabsenceandsocialandhealthproblemsmadeworsebylockdownsandCovid

“It’s easy to see how some of the mental health issues can be linked to deprivation. It is estimated that 25-30% of students experience or have experienced mental health issues. It’s a crisis on every level,” he said.

“Attendance is a huge problem. This is the biggest challenge for schools today. If you’re trying to manage attendance, it gets to the heart of social issues like mental health, housing, and deprivation.



Cardiff West Community High School

Mr Hulland said protection credentials have started to drop since schools reopened after the second lockdown, but schools are still worried about where children are, what they are doing and how well they are safe when they are not at school. Anti-social behavior beyond school gates has also increased in many parts of Wales since the start of the pandemic and is seeping into schools, he warned.

He said he was “proud” of the work of parents, pupils and staff, but more support is needed.

“A number of parents would like additional support. It’s about increasing contact with the community, inviting parents and getting them to talk to us. Some families are struggling. Low attendance is the result of deep-rooted social issues that require additional resources that schools cannot manage on their own. It’s a time of change and everyone is struggling.

“I would say to parents who don’t send their children: schools are safe places. We have worked hard to move forward and want students and support families. It is very important that students come to school every day.

Welcoming the Welsh Government’s ‘community schools’ plan, Mr Hulland said schools must be given the funds needed to tackle all the huge problems made worse by the pandemic and to encourage children and their families to see education as part of the solution.

Thousands of children miss school across Wales

The latest school attendance data from the Welsh Government released on May 4 shows:

  • Between April 25 and April 29, more than 65,000 school sessions were missed by children for permitted and unauthorized reasons, including illness and holidays.
  • On average, 90.8% of all students attended school in the first week of the April 25-29 term, compared to 87.1% at the end of the last term.
  • Attendance is lowest in key exam years. More than one in four pupils in A level 13 are not present and more than one in 10 GCSE year 11 are absent.
  • On April 29 alone, 81.5% of children eligible for free school meals were in school, compared to 88.9% of their more affluent classmates. On the same day, nearly 18,000 students were absent in total, including 1,142 (1.2%) primary students and 1,614 (3.5%) secondary students absent for known reasons related to Covid. The most common reason for absence is illness and not Covid.
  • Since September 2021, 271 children in Wales have missed 40 or more days of school for known Covid-related reasons and 31,591 for any other reason.
  • A total of 88,326 (18%) of children have missed between five and a half and 10 days of school since September for known Covid-related reasons.

Average school attendance across Wales by age group 25-29 April

  • Reception 92.6
  • Year 1 93.1
  • Year 2 93.4
  • Year 3 93.2
  • Year 4 93.3
  • Year 5 93.1
  • Year 6 93.0
  • Year 7 91.6
  • Year 8 90.3
  • Year 9 89.1
  • Year 10 88.8
  • Year 11 87.1
  • Year 12 83.3
  • Year 13 73.6

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Renfrewshire: Wardens get new powers to curb anti-social behavior https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/renfrewshire-wardens-get-new-powers-to-curb-anti-social-behavior/ Wed, 04 May 2022 08:26:15 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/renfrewshire-wardens-get-new-powers-to-curb-anti-social-behavior/ Renfrewshire Council officers will examine how the powers of Community Guardians can be strengthened to help tackle anti-social behaviour. This follows the passage of a motion put forward by Independent Councilor Andy Doig who urged the local authority to build on a recently published strategy on the subject by considering further scrutiny. Councilor Doig, who […]]]>

Renfrewshire Council officers will examine how the powers of Community Guardians can be strengthened to help tackle anti-social behaviour.

This follows the passage of a motion put forward by Independent Councilor Andy Doig who urged the local authority to build on a recently published strategy on the subject by considering further scrutiny.

Councilor Doig, who represents Johnstone North, Kilbarchan, Howwood and Lochwinnoch, spoke of ‘heartbreaking stories’ of bullying and harassment that have ravaged local communities.

He said downtown Johnstone is a particular hotspot for anti-social behavior.

The council agreed to consider “best practice” from other local authorities on this front before reporting to the communities, housing and planning board.

“There are two ways to deal with antisocial behavior,” Councilor Doig said. “We can deal with it procedurally – and the council’s procedures, compared to other councils in Scotland, are very good. They have been praised by other councils for their collaborative approach.

“It’s a way of approaching the problem. We also need to do more to address it on the front lines, where it really happens, in our communities, in our villages, in our programs, in our city centers.

“I have heard harrowing stories. Over the past five years I have heard appalling stories of anti-social behavior not exclusively but primarily in parts of downtown Johnstone.

“People have developed mental health issues due to the impact of low level bullying, harassment and continuous noise. We need to manage this better. »

Councilor Doig made it clear he wanted the role of community guardians ‘to remain within the scope of council’, but added: ‘I think we need to consider giving them more powers to work with the police.

“I think it’s important because we have to tackle it on the pitch.

“We have to be able to send our goalkeepers into situations where they make a difference.”

Councilor Cathy McEwan said sharing best practice with other local authorities also provides an opportunity to showcase the “good work” of Renfrewshire Council.

She added: “If we can add more to this by looking at other best practices, there’s absolutely no reason why we shouldn’t.”

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Three children arrested after throwing objects at a ‘Trojan bus’ full of police https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/three-children-arrested-after-throwing-objects-at-a-trojan-bus-full-of-police/ Mon, 02 May 2022 15:37:06 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/three-children-arrested-after-throwing-objects-at-a-trojan-bus-full-of-police/ Read more Read more “We will not back down on this,” promises the head of the Leeds Civic Trust as David Oluwale pl… Last night, officers from the local Bradford East Neighborhood Police carried out a Trojan Bus operation with First Bus in the Ravenscliffe area. Three youths were arrested by officers for throwing objects […]]]>

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“We will not back down on this,” promises the head of the Leeds Civic Trust as David Oluwale pl…

Last night, officers from the local Bradford East Neighborhood Police carried out a Trojan Bus operation with First Bus in the Ravenscliffe area.

Three youths were arrested by officers for throwing objects at buses, police confirmed.

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Three youths have been arrested by police after throwing objects at a ‘Trojan bus’ full of officers.

The three minors were taken home and given antisocial behavior warnings.

Inspector Paul Riley of the Bradford East Borough Police Team said: “It’s great work from my team, and it’s great to see we’re seeing positive results in this area.

“Trojan’s bus patrols are very effective for us as they can reassure residents and catch those committing anti-social behavior offences.

“I hope this sends a clear message to young people involved in anti-social behavior that it will not be tolerated, and we will deal with those who break the law.

‘We will continue to call on local residents to report any incidents of anti-social behavior to us, by calling 101 or using the contact options at www.westyorkshire.police.uk/contactus’

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Effective implementation of corporal punishment laws highlighted https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/effective-implementation-of-corporal-punishment-laws-highlighted/ Sun, 01 May 2022 00:52:24 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/effective-implementation-of-corporal-punishment-laws-highlighted/ Islamabad: Be careful hitting children provokes their aggressive and anti-social behavior, experts on Saturday stressed the need for effective enforcement of laws against corporal punishment of minors at home and at school. On an international day to end corporal punishment, they also urged the government to fulfill its commitment to take the necessary administrative, social […]]]>

Islamabad: Be careful hitting children provokes their aggressive and anti-social behavior, experts on Saturday stressed the need for effective enforcement of laws against corporal punishment of minors at home and at school.

On an international day to end corporal punishment, they also urged the government to fulfill its commitment to take the necessary administrative, social and educational measures to protect children from physical and mental violence, abuse and exploitation. .

The event was organized by the United World Development Organization (UGOOD) and the Pakistan National Action Coordinating Group against Violence against Children in collaboration with the Hashoo Foundation, the National Commission for children’s rights and the Ministry of Human Rights to the national press. Club here at what they said raise their voices for the elimination of corporal punishment. NACG Pakistan coordinator Mehwish Kayani told participants that corporal punishment was intended to cause physical pain to people, especially minors, at home and in schools, with the most common methods being spanking and the paddle.

She said prisoners and slaves were also subjected to this physical punishment. “Many countries have banned this heinous practice, but Pakistan is among 69 countries trying to eradicate it from educational institutions,” she said.

Ms Mehwish Kayani said that in addition to spanking, slapping, pinching, pulling, twisting and hitting with an object, forcing a child to consume unpleasant substances such as soap, hot sauce or chilli is also a form of corporal punishment.

She said many parents use corporal punishment to teach children acceptable behaviors, especially how to make good choices and exercise self-control, without realizing that corporal punishment leads to increased aggression. , antisocial behavior, physical injuries and mental health problems among minors.

“This day [International Day to End Corporal Punishment] is an opportunity for us to show our support for all child victims of corporal punishment and calls for better protection of children as holders of human rights. The government has pledged to end violence against children by 2030, but corporal punishment continues to ruin the lives of billions of children. We know what works and we have eight years to end corporal punishment,” she said.

Mr Ali Haider from Askariya School said that the children had constantly expressed the urgent need to end all kinds of violence against them. He said some people have argued that it’s okay to slap a child or a cane or two when they’re misbehaving, but that’s not okay, just like it’s not okay to do this to an adult. “Think about it… Let’s end corporal punishment together. When a child receives physical punishment, society tells them – and an entire generation – that violence is a valid way to solve a problem,” he said.

Syed Abdul Ahad Gilani of the Future World School said corporal punishment is the most common form of violence against children, with about four in five children worldwide between the ages of 2 and 14 being subjected to it each year at home ( corporal punishment and/or psychological aggression).

He said research had found strong evidence linking violent punishment to multiple harmful impacts on the child and society, including significant economic costs. “Corporal punishment violates children’s right to respect for their human dignity and physical integrity, as well as their rights to health, development, education and freedom from torture and other cruel treatment or punishment, inhuman or degrading.” Mr. Ahad Gilani said that the government was committed to ending violence against children in Sustainable Development Goal 16.2, so serious actions were needed without delay to translate this commitment into reality.

Hania Shafique, of Froebel’s International School, said the widespread social acceptance of corporal punishment meant that some degree of violence in child-rearing was normalized, entrenching children’s lower status in society and opening the door to other forms of violence and abuse. “As the smallest and most vulnerable members of society, children deserve more, not less, protection from harm,” she said. Tajdar Hashmi, a child member of the NCRC, called for the necessary changes or repeal of the laws to ensure that none of them are interpreted as providing a defense against corporal punishment.

He said that corporal punishment of children should be prohibited in all its forms and manifestations and in all settings, from alternative care facilities and day care centers to schools and correctional facilities, and that all judicial corporal punishment should prohibited, including under Shariah and traditional legal systems. Faryal Javed, a child member of the NCRC, said the Federal Directorate of Education, which regulates public sector schools and colleges in Islamabad, has warned teachers against mandatory retirement and even dismissal for corporal punishment.

She said that Pakistan had ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) and that the government was bound by it to take appropriate legislative, administrative, social and educational measures to protect children against physical and mental violence, injury and abuse, neglect, and neglect, abuse and exploitation. Urging provincial governments to pass legislation on corporal punishment and its effective enforcement, she also called for teachers trained in positive discipline methods.

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